Woman of the Year

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2015 Woman of the Year finalist: Supriya Davis

The Swarthmore swimmer learned she was awarded a Fulbright Scholarship shortly before graduating in May with degrees in chemistry and computer science. So, in August, she used the scholarship to move to India where she will spend nine months researching tuberculosis, hoping to find a simple, fast and non-invasive way to diagnose this global disease.

NCAA names top 30 honorees for Woman of the Year Award

Thirty women have been recognized by the NCAA Woman of the Year selection committee as the top 30 honorees for the 2015 Woman of the Year Award.

Celebrating the 2015 Woman of the Year Top 30 Honorees

Meet the 2015 NCAA Woman of the Year top 30 honorees who exemplify excellence in academics, athletics, community service and leadership.

2011 NCAA Woman of the Year

 

Laura Barito is the 2011 NCAA Woman of the Year

October 16, 2011

Laura Barito -  2011 NCAA Woman of the Year

Laura Barito, a 22-time All-American in swimming and track, two-time NCAA national champion and mechanical engineering graduate of Stevens Institute of Technology, is the 2011 NCAA Woman of the Year.

Barito, a native of Arkadelphia, Ark., accepted the prestigious NCAA honor at the 21st annual NCAA Woman of the Year awards program Sunday evening in Indianapolis. The award honors female student-athletes who have distinguished themselves throughout their collegiate careers in academic achievement, athletic excellence, community service and leadership.

“It definitely puts together everything that I’ve been striving to do for, not even the last four years, but my entire life,” said Barito, who was enveloped in a bear hug by parents Barbara and Tom Barito after her name was announced as the 2011 honoree. “I never really expected to be recognized for the stuff that I’ve done…it always just seemed like it made sense, this was what I am supposed to be doing.

“I think it’s a really neat thing the NCAA is doing recognizing these (women) for what they’re doing.”

Barito earned NCAA titles in swimming (50-yard freestyle) and track (400-meter hurdles) at Stevens Institute, a Division III school in Hoboken, N.J. She said jokingly that “swim meets and track meets never made me this nervous” as she gave a short speech after accepting the NCAA Woman of the Year award.

The eight-time Empire 8 conference record holder in swimming was named Conference Athlete of the Week six times in the sport. She also earned Conference Athlete of the Week three times in track, was a four-time Empire 8 champion in track and was the hurdle/sprint team captain. Additionally, she competed in cross country and earned all-conference honors in that sport. She was a nutrition representative and service leader for both the track and swimming teams. Selected twice as Stevens Athlete of the Year, Barito was also named Empire 8 Swimmer of the Year during her career.

“Not a lot of people expected a lot out of me,” Barito said. “I came from a small town in Arkansas, so it was kind of me just going out on a limb expecting I could do something with my college experience in athletics. I think if you have a gift or you have a talent, go for it and don’t let anyone tell you that you can’t do it. Because not a lot of people were telling me I could.”

In her community service work, Barito volunteered as a server at a local homeless shelter and tutored underprivileged school children. At her church, she was a member of the worship band, a greeter and a member of the college ministry team. On campus, she was a freshman orientation leader, a mentor for incoming freshmen, and a member of Stevens Institute’s Student-Athlete Advisory Committee.

The mathematics enthusiast appeared on Stevens Institute’s President’s List from 2007 to 2011 and was named a College Swimming Coaches Association of America Scholar All-American from 2008 to 2011. CoSIDA/Capital One named Barito to the Academic All-America First Team and the Empire 8 named her a Senior Scholar winner. She was also a member of the Tau Beta Pi Engineering Honor Society and Pi Tau Sigma Mechanical Engineering Honor Society.

“Academics definitely came first with me and I was looking for an engineering program with a swim team I could swim for and make a difference,” Barito said. “Division III athletes are really unique, I think, because they’re doing it for the love of the game…It was just a great experience overall.”

Barito is currently in graduate school at the University of Delaware, pursuing a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering and bio-mechanics. Though she is only in her first year of research, Barito is working on projects that involve the knees, including knee replacements and knee implants. She is also in training for the U.S. Swimming nationals in December.

“Being a student-athlete definitely taught me even more discipline and hard work than I learned even just getting to college through high school and it’s definitely carried with me now,” she said. “I’m still in school, I’m still training, I’m still an athlete, so not much has changed…It’s allowed me to do a lot of things I never thought that I could do.”

Program host Lisa Salters, an ESPN reporter and former Penn State basketball student-athlete, called Barito and the other finalists honored Sunday “amazing and awe-inspiring.”

The NCAA Committee on Women’s Athletics selected Barito as this year’s NCAA Woman of the Year. A committee of representatives from NCAA schools and conferences selected the nine finalists from a group of 30 honorees. Those individuals were identified from a pool of 142 conference nominees. A record 471 nominations by NCAA-member colleges and universities were initially received this summer.

To be eligible for the award, a female student-athlete must have completed intercollegiate eligibility in her primary sport by the end of the 2011 spring season, graduated no later than the end of the summer 2011 term and achieved a minimum cumulative grade-point average of 2.5. Barito is the ninth swimming student-athlete to be named NCAA Woman of the Year since the program began in 1991. Last year’s NCAA Woman of the Year was Justine Schluntz, a former swimmer from the University of Arizona.

 

NCAA chooses nine finalists for 2011 Woman of the Year

The NCAA has selected nine outstanding women as finalists for the 2011 Woman of the Year award, which will be presented Oct. 16 in Indianapolis.

The nine finalists, along with the other honorees who made the Top 30, will be invited to Indianapolis for the Woman of the Year festivities.  The award weekend will include a community service project that gives honorees the opportunity to interact with young girls in the city of Indianapolis and serve as role models for them.  The NCAA will also host a reception in their honor.

The NCAA’s Woman of the Year Award, now in its 21st year, honors female student-athletes who have distinguished themselves throughout their collegiate careers in academic achievement, athletic excellence, community service and leadership.   Every NCAA member institution is encouraged to honor its top graduating female student-athlete by submitting her name for consideration.  Each conference assesses the eligibility of its members’ nominees and selects at least one student-athlete to represent the conference.    

To be eligible for the award, a female student-athlete must have completed  eligibility in her primary sport by the end of the 2011 spring season, graduated no later than the end of the summer 2011 term and achieved a minimum cumulative grade-point average of 2.5.  The NCAA Committee on Women’s Athletics selects the national winner from the nine finalists.    

Last year’s NCAA Woman of the Year was Justine Schluntz, a 2010 Rhodes Scholar, swimmer and mechanical engineering major, from the University of Arizona.  

Following are biographies of this year’s Woman of the Year finalists:

 

Division I

Danielle Blair, University of Alabama at Birmingham
Conference USA
Marketing, Management and Industrial Distribution
Soccer
Hometown:  Toronto, Ontario Canada

Excerpt from personal statement:  “As a collegiate athlete, I aspire to apply the skills I have developed through sports – strategizing, organizing and coordinating - to the community in a meaningful way; being competitive in my sport and extending this drive to the development of innovative community learning programs.”

As the founder and organizer of Blazer Buddies Mentoring Program, Blair visited elementary schools with other student-athletes to educate children about healthy lifestyles through athletics.   Blair also served on the university’s Student-Athlete Advisory Committee as the chair of the community service and public relations committees.  The soccer team captain also was involved in many community service projects.

A triple major in marketing, management and industrial distribution, Blair achieved a near-perfect GPA, graduated summa cum laude and earned Presidential Honors for her academic achievements nearly every  semester  She was also named UAB’s Most Outstanding Student for both industrial distribution and management.

Additionally, Blair received the Conference USA Academic Medal of Honor and was on the conference’s Academic Commissioner’s Honor Roll. She was inducted into Sigma Delta, Beta Chapter Industrial Distribution Honor Society, Beta Gamma Sigma International Honor Society and Chi Alpha Sigma National College Athlete Honor Society.

A member of the Trinidad & Tobago national soccer team, Blair was UAB’s Most Valuable Player and received the UAB Coach’s Award in 2009. Blair was named a UAB Student-Athlete of the Week multiple times.

 

Annie Chandler, University of Arizona
Pacific-12 Conference
Journalism
Swimming
Hometown:  San Antonio, Texas

Excerpt from personal statement: “Honoring your team can be pouring your heart into practice, striving for academic excellence, leading with integrity, or joyfully serving your community. The ability to contribute is an honor. Community service can open an athlete’s eyes to a world beyond sport – a world incomprehensibly grateful for your contributions.”

She’s an NCAA Division I swimming national champion and record holder in the 100-meter breaststroke, but Chandler’s excellence extends well outside the pool.   A Top 12 finalist for the University of Arizona’s Outstanding Senior Awards, Chandler excelled in the classroom, graduating cum laude with a bachelor’s degree in journalism.  She also served as managing editor of the Tombstone Epitaph, the school’s biweekly newspaper in 2010, and earned First-Team Academic All-American honors by ESPN the Magazine the same year.

A supporter of her community, Chandler has dedicated countless hours to service, visiting with hospital patients, working with underprivileged children and volunteering at numerous swimming clinics to spread her love of the sport.

Chandler was a leader in athletics as well, serving as team captain of Arizona’s swimming and diving team, and helping freshmen transition into their lives as student-athletes as a Peer Athletic Leader.

In addition to her individual national championship in the 100-yard breaststroke, Chandler won six additional national championships in medley relays during her four-year tenure at Arizona.   The 18-time All-American also competed internationally in 2008 and 2010 when she was a member of the U.S. Women’s National Team.

 

Grace Johnson, University of Georgia
Southeastern Conference
Health Promotion & Education
Gymnastics
Hometown:  Aiken, S.C.

Excerpt from personal statement:   “My life-long interest is to serve in underprivileged communities, specifically through missions and non-profit work.   Initially, I thought becoming a medical doctor would best prepare me to fulfill my calling; however, it was my work in the community that led me to realize the cost-effectiveness and great need for preventative medicine and education.”

Johnson knows the true meaning of being a champion, helping the Gym Dogs to three NCAA national championship team titles during her collegiate tenure.   She also earned numerous individual accolades, including the NCAA balance beam title in 2008 and five All-America honors.  

Selected to the ESPN the Magazine Academic All-America First Team in 2010, Johnson was also a member of the National Gymnastics Coaches Association All-Scholastic Team from 2007 to 2010. She was named to the University of Georgia Athletics Director’s Honor Roll four consecutive years and earned the highest GPA on the gymnastics team in 2008 and 2009.  In her field of study, she earned a UGA College of Public Health honor student recognition in 2009 and 2010.  She earned the UGA Ramsey Scholarship for Athletic and Academic Excellence, which recognizes the top 10 UGA student-athletes who have the highest GPAs.   

In the community, Johnson taught gymnastics to Special Olympics athletes; was a Bible study leader; collected canned food for a local food bank; and was an intern at Mercy Health Center.   She also served as a student member of the UGA Athletic Association Board of Directions, a mentor for freshmen student-athletes and a member of the university’s Student-Athlete Advisory Committee.

 

Division II

Victoria Hansen, West Liberty University
West Virginia Intercollegiate Athletic Conference
Mathematics Education
Basketball
Hometown:  McKean, Pa.

Excerpt from personal statement: “My experiences and opportunities as a high-profile student-athlete in the West Liberty community have transformed my life. Simply put, I’m not the same quiet little girl who came to this campus with the singular goal of developing my basketball skills. Four years later, I have found my ‘voice’ and grown into an outgoing and confident young woman who is ready to guide future generations as my teachers and coaches have guided me.”

A mathematics education major, Hansen took the lead in the classroom throughout college.   Finishing her degree with a 4.0 GPA, she was the 2010-11 Capital One/CoSIDA College Division Academic All-American of the Year and the 2009-10 NCAA Division II Conference Commissioners Association Atlantic Region Scholar-Athlete of the Year.

Hansen dedicated significant time serving the West Liberty community, volunteering as a mathematics tutor and as an after-school counselor for inner-city youth.   Her passion for children shone as she volunteered countless hours to West Liberty-led service days that created physical activity opportunities for youth, including those with physical challenges.   She also supported her fellow West Liberty student-athletes, volunteering as a sports information student assistant, leading the stat crew for all volleyball matches.

On the court, Hansen was a three-time team captain from 2008 to 2011 and was the 2010-11 Daktronics NCAA Division II Atlantic Region Player of the Year.  She is No. 2 on the West Virginia Conference’s all-time leading scoring list with 2,300 career points and was the nation’s third-leading scorer in back-to- back years during her sophomore and junior seasons.

 

Hewenfei Elwen Li, Brigham Young University, Hawaii
Pacific West Conference
Biology Pre-Professional and Exercise Sport Science
Tennis
Hometown:  Chengdu, Sichuan P.R. China

Excerpt from personal statement:  “Professors from many disciplines and a coach helped me to understand that success is judged not by what others see, but by how one feels.  I have been privileged that those same professors and the coach cared enough about me as a person to push me outside the lab and the gym.  Because of this, I placed myself in situations where I could serve, where I could learn from others and where I could understand how others think and feel.”  

At Brigham Young-Hawaii, Li had a major presence on the tennis court, in the classroom and in the community.   She earned Pacific West Conference All-Academic honors three consecutive years (2009-11) and was the Pacific West Women’s Tennis Scholar of the Year four years in a row.   She was named to the Dean’s List nearly every semester and graduated magna cum laude.

Li was ranked as high as second nationally in singles and earned top honors in doubles competition her freshman and senior seasons.   She helped her team to second place at the NCAA Division II Women’s Tennis Championships in 2008 and 2010 and a third-place team finish in 2009.  Additionally, she was named the Pacific West Conference Player of the Year and the conference tournament MVP in 2010.   From 2007 to 2011, her record in singles was 105-3 and her record in doubles was 106-4.

Li was a member her school’s Student-Athlete Advisory Committee, a volunteer teacher for community junior tennis groups and a volunteer who conducted seminars for elementary students on health and wellness.    She also helped build playgrounds for student housing facilities and helped the BYU-Hawaii Student Association with soccer field renovations.  

As a leader, Li was named vice president of her school’s pre-med club.  She was also a volunteer counselor with the National Alliance on Mental Illness, responding to calls on mental illness issues. 

 

Kelsey Ward, Drury University
Great Lakes Valley Conference
Chemistry and Biology
Swimming
Hometown:  St. Charles, Mo.

Excerpt from personal statement:   “My passion to be a doctor began when I was very young, and that passion has only grown over the years.    My sophomore year of college, my best friend was diagnosed with cancer, and then a second teammate was diagnosed with a brain tumor.   These two experiences validated in me how people’s lives are put back together through the dedication of doctors.”   

Ward earned numerous academic honors while at Drury, including being named to the Dean’s List every semester.  Named Outstanding Freshman in Chemistry, she continued to earn accolades and was named a College Swimming Coaches Association of America Scholar All-American her freshman, sophomore, junior and senior years.   She was a two-time nominee for the prestigious NCAA Elite 88 honor and was a finalist for the NCAA Walter Byers Award.   She also earned an NCAA postgraduate scholarship and now is studying medicine in Colorado.

Ward, a team captain, helped Drury to three NCAA Division II national championships during her four years.   She also finished in the top 10 at the national championships her senior year in the 50-, 100-, and 200-freestyle events.   She set national records in swimming and was a member of several relay teams that had top finishes.   

Giving back to the community, she helped organize Drury’s annual blood drive; volunteered with Habitat for Humanity; was a meet timer for the Special Olympics; and organized a volunteer walk initiative for a Leukemia and Lymphoma Society “Light the Night” event.   She was treasurer for the Pre-Health Professions Club; a member of Drury’s Student-Athlete Advisory Committee; a member of the American Chemical Society; and a member of the Tri Beta Honor Society.

 

Division III

Laura Barito, Stevens Institute of Technology
Empire 8 Conference
Mechanical Engineering
Swimming, Track and Cross Country
Hometown:  Arkadelphia, Ark.

Excerpt from personal statement:  “Someone believed in me four years ago. They believed in me as a student, at a challenging school with a rigorous curriculum. They believed in me as an athlete and gave me resources to grow from an un-recruited swimmer to a National Champion. I leave with a prestigious degree in mechanical engineering and proof that the underdog can surpass expectations.”

A 22-time All-American in swimming and track, Barito is a national champion in swimming (50-yard freestyle) and track (400-meter hurdles) – Stevens’ first national championships.  The eight-time Empire 8 record holder for numerous swimming events was named conference Athlete of the Week nine times during her career.  Barito was the hurdle/sprint team captain for track, as well as nutrition representative and service leader for the track and swimming teams.  Selected twice as Stevens Athlete of the Year, she was also the Empire 8 Swimmer of the Year.

Barito served on the school’s Student-Athlete Advisory Committee, volunteered as a server at a local homeless shelter and tutored underprivileged school children.  At her church, she was a member of the worship band, a greeter and a member of the college ministry team.

The mathematics enthusiast appeared on the President’s List from 2007 to 2011 and was named a NCAA Scholar All-American from 2008 to 2011. CoSIDA/ESPN the Magazine named Barito to the Academic All-America First Team and the Empire 8 named her a Senior Scholar winner.  Barito, a Stevens Honors Scholar, was also a member of the Tau Beta Pi Engineering Honor Society and Pi Tau Sigma Mechanical Engineering Honor Society.

 

Michaela Calnan, Bowdoin College
New England Small College Athletic Conferenc
Neuroscience
Field Hockey and Ice Hockey
Hometown:  Melrose, Mass.

Excerpt from personal statement:  “Throughout my college career I have been presented with extraordinary opportunities and I have been able to follow my passions to the fullest on the field, in the classroom and in my community. While following my passions, I have created a unique identity for myself on campus – I am not just another athlete, scientist, or volunteer. Instead, I think of myself as a well-rounded woman and a contributing member of my community.”
 

A Sarah and James Bowdoin Scholar, Calnan was named to the New England Small College Athletic Conference All-Academic Team for ice hockey and field hockey multiple times. The neuroscience major was named a National Field Hockey Coaches Association Academic-All American each of her four years at Bowdoin and graduated with honors.

While attending Bowdoin, Calnan served as a McKeen Fellow for Community Engagement for the Center for Common Good from 2009 to 2011. She was the treasurer of Circle K, a community service and leadership program, and she served as a group leader for a middle school mentoring program.  Calnan also participated in a book drive for Ghana and worked a sports station at a Girls and Women in Sports Day event.   She was a member of a committee that organized workshops to help underclassmen gain or refine skills to help them succeed in college, and she was a facilitator for a group that encouraged discussions with women’s athletic teams about sexual assaults and violence.

Calnan led her team to three NCAA Division III field hockey national titles.  As ice hockey team captain, she also received the Seventh Player Award in 2010 and the Christopher Charles Watras Memorial Women’s Ice Hockey Trophy in 2010 and 2011. Calnan was named to the NESCAC All-Sportsmanship Team for ice hockey in 2011 and to the NFCHA Second Team All-Region squad in 2010.  In addition, Calnan received an Unsung Hero award for field hockey in 2010.

 

Hayley Emerick, Trinity University (Texas)
Southern Collegiate Athletic Conference
Business Administration with a concentration in Marketing
Diving
Hometown: Portland, Texas

Excerpt from personal statement: “My academic experience taught me hard work, perseverance, and determination while my athletic experience taught me to set my goals high and to create a plan for reaching them step-by-step.  It has given me patience and the ability to plan well into the future, and I have realized that rigorous preparation, though tough, eventually pays off.”

A six-time All-American, Emerick achieved academic and athletic excellence while a member of Trinity University’s diving team, serving as its captain for the 2010-11 season.  She competed in the NCAA Division III Swimming and Diving Championships all four of her years on the team, winning the three-meter diving title in 2010 and placing second in the three-meter and one-meter events in 2011.  She was also an outstanding member of the community, serving the San Antonio and Corpus Christi areas in a variety of capacities, including work for the YWCA, YMCA and Habitat for Humanity.

The summer before her senior year, Emerick spent five weeks in Costa Rica with the Cross Cultural Solutions Volunteer Abroad program.  She worked on marketing development for a small business in the country, while volunteering at a local orphanage and teaching English at a local university.

She excelled in the classroom as a member of Alpha Lambda Delta honor society and the National Society of Collegiate Scholars, and was a founding member of the Delta Sigma Pi business fraternity on Trinity’s campus.  She was a 2009-10 ESPN the Magazine Academic All-American and is the recipient of an NCAA Postgraduate Scholarship.

 

NCAA announces Top 30 for Woman of the Year

August 23, 2011

Thirty women, 10 from each NCAA membership division, have been selected as the top 30 honorees for the Woman of the Year award. 

Now in its 21st year, the Woman of the Year Award honors female student-athletes who have distinguished themselves throughout their collegiate careers in academic achievement, athletics excellence, community service and leadership.   

To be eligible for the award, a student-athlete must have completed intercollegiate eligibility in her primary sport by the end of the 2011 spring season, graduated no later than the end of the summer 2011 term and achieved a minimum cumulative grade-point average of 2.5. Last year’s winner, Justine Schluntz, was an NCAA swimming champion and 2010 Rhodes Scholar from the University of Arizona.

Sharon Beverly, NCAA Woman of the Year selection chair and director of athletics and physical education at Vassar College, described the award as one of the most prestigious honors presented to a female student-athlete each year.  

“This award catapults the recipient into the next phase of her life and paves the way for a successful future in any chosen profession,” Beverly said. “When you consider the academic and athletic accomplishments of each of the candidates for this award and the ways they have given back to society, the Woman of the Year honorees are the top echelon of NCAA role models.”  

The top 30 honorees were nominated by conference and independent members and represent multiple sports. Three finalists will be chosen from each division to form the nine finalists for the Woman of the Year award.

The national winner will be chosen by the NCAA Committee on Women’s Athletics and will be announced in an Oct. 16 ceremony in Indianapolis.

The top 30 honorees are:

Name Division Conference Institution Sport(s)
Barito, Laura III Empire 8 Stevens Institute of Technology Cross Country, Swimming, Outdoor Track
Blair, Danielle I Conference USA University of Alabama at Birmingham Soccer
Calnan, Michaela III New England Small College Athletic Conference Bowdoin College Field Hockey, Ice hockey
Carlson, Whitney I The Summit League North Dakota State University Indoor and Outdoor Track
Carr, Catherine II Central Atlantic Collegiate Conference Holy Family University Basketball
Chandler, Annie I Pacific-10 Conference University of Arizona Swimming
Da Silva, Diane III North Eastern Athletic Conference College of Saint Elizabeth Basketball, Soccer and Lacrosse
Egenolf, Audra I Conference USA Southern Methodist University Swimming
Emerick, Hayley III Southern Collegiate Athletic Conference Trinity University (Texas) Diving
Evans, Molly III University Athletic Association Carnegie Mellon University Swimming
Frahm, Kristina I Mid-Eastern Athletic Conf. University of Maryland, Eastern Shore Bowling
Gagne, Shannon II Northeast-10 Conference University of New Haven Indoor and Outdoor Track
Gale, Stormi II South Atlantic Conference Wingate University Volleyball
Hammond, Courtney I The Ivy League Dartmouth College Skiing
Hansen, Victoria II West Virginia Intercollegiate Athletic Conference West Liberty University Basketball
Horn, Nicole II Independent Henderson State University Swimming
Johnson, Grace I Southeastern Conference University of Georgia Gymnastics
Kelly, Colleen III New England Women's & Men's Athletic Conference Babson College Field Hockey
Li, Hewenfei Elwen II Pacific West Conference Brigham Young University, Hawaii Tennis
McCord, Marcia III Empire 8 Ithaca College Indoor and Outdoor Track
Moore, Maya I Big East Conference University of Connecticut Basketball
Müller-Wehlau, Alida II Peach Belt Conference Armstrong Atlantic State University Tennis
Murphy, Samantha II Pacific West Conference Grand Canyon University Basketball
Navarre, Katalin III North Coast Athletic Conference Denison University Cross Country, Indoor and Outdoor Track
Peloquin, Maria III Wisconsin Intercollegiate Athletic Conference University of Wisconsin, Eau Claire Cross Country and Indoor Track
Phillips, Kelly I Atlantic Coast Conference Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University Indoor and Outdoor Track
Pocza, Barbara II Sunshine State Conference Barry University Tennis
Stephens, Sarah III Capital Athletic Conference Inc. Frostburg State University Tennis and Volleyball
Tomlin, Renee I Big East Conference Georgetown University Cross Country, Indoor and Outdoor Track
Ward, Kelsey II Great Lakes Valley Conference Drury University Swimming

 

NCAA announces Woman of the Year conference honorees for 2011

August 4, 2011

More than 140 NCAA female student-athletes representing multiple sports across Divisions I, II and III have been selected as 2011 Woman of the Year nominees by their athletic conferences and by independent institutions.

The Woman of the Year Award, now in its 21st year, honors female student-athletes who have distinguished themselves throughout their collegiate careers in academic achievement, athletic excellence, community service and leadership.   2010 Woman of the Year Justine Schluntz was an NCAA swimming champion and 2010 Rhodes Scholar from the University of Arizona.  

Nomination submissions for the prestigious NCAA Woman of the Year program continue to grow, with a record 471 nominations received for this year’s program, an increase of 19 over last year.   Every NCAA member institution is encouraged to honor its top graduating female student-athlete by submitting her name for consideration.  Each conference assesses the eligibility of its members’ nominees and selects at least one student-athlete to represent the conference.   To be eligible for the award, a female student-athlete must have completed intercollegiate eligibility in her primary sport by the end of the 2011 spring season, graduated no later than the end of the summer 2011 term and achieved a minimum cumulative grade-point average of 2.5.

With the 142 conference nominees selected, a committee composed of representatives from NCAA member schools and athletic conferences will select 10 nominees from each of the three divisions to compose the Top 30 nominees, who will be announced in late August.  The selection committee will then narrow the Top 30 to three finalists from each division to form the Top Nine, which will be announced in early September.  From the Top Nine finalists, the NCAA Committee on Women’s Athletics will select the national winner.   The 2011 NCAA Woman of the Year will be announced during the Woman of the Year dinner in Indianapolis on Sunday, October 16.

 

Record number nominated for NCAA Woman of the Year

June 23, 2011

A record 471 college and university nominees were received for the 21st annual NCAA Woman of the Year award that will be presented in October.

The award honors senior female student-athletes who have distinguished themselves throughout their collegiate careers in the areas of academic achievement, athletics excellence, service and leadership.

Every NCAA member institution is encouraged to honor its top graduating female student-athlete by submitting their name for consideration. Nominations are received from all three divisions.

Conferences assess each nominee’s eligibility and select one woman to represent their conference. Those names are then sent to the Woman of the Year selection committee, which is tasked with choosing the top 10 honorees in each division.

From among those 30 candidates, the selection committee will determine the top three in each division. Finally, members of the NCAA Committee on Women’s Athletics will vote from among the top nine finalists to determine the 2011 NCAA Woman of the Year.

To be eligible for the award, a female student-athlete must have completed intercollegiate eligibility in her primary sport by the end of the 2011 spring season, graduated no later than the end of the summer 2011 term and achieved a minimum cumulative grade-point average of 2.5.

The top 10 honorees per division will be announced in August, followed by the top three honorees by division in September. The top 30 honorees and the nine finalists from Divisions I, II and III will be honored and the 2010 NCAA Woman of the Year winner will be announced at the annual ceremony in Indianapolis on Oct. 16.

 

 

2010 NCAA Woman of the Year

 

Justine Schluntz is the 2010 NCAA Woman of the Year

2010 NCAA Woman of the Year, Justine Schluntz

Justine Schluntz, a former swimming student-athlete at the University of Arizona, past-NCAA champion and 2010 Rhodes Scholar, is the 2010 NCAA Woman of the Year.

Schluntz accepted the award – among the most prestigious the NCAA bestows – during the 20th annual NCAA Woman of the Year event Sunday, October 17, at the Indiana Convention Center. The award honors female student-athletes who have completed their eligibility, demonstrated academic and athletics excellence while demonstrating extraordinary community service and leadership.

Schluntz majored in mechanical engineering at Arizona and graduated summa cum laude.

“Studying engineering as a female generated many challenges, but by working through these, I learned to persevere in the face of adversity in any setting,” she said in her personal statement on her nomination form.

A committee of representatives from NCAA schools and conferences selected nine finalists from a pool of 30 selected honorees. Those individuals were identified from an initial pool of 131 conference and independent honorees representing all three NCAA divisions and multiple sports.

The NCAA Committee on Women’s Athletics selected Schluntz as the national winner.

A native of Albuquerque, Schluntz is the fourth student-athlete from the University of Arizona and seventh swimming student-athlete to be named NCAA Woman of the Year. She represents the Pac-10 Conference.

After suffering a season-ending injury her freshman year, Schluntz began to mentor younger athletes and get involved in community service. She volunteered for Big Brothers/Big Sisters for two years, taught swim lessons to children and volunteered with Casa de los Ninos, an organization that seeks to prevent child abuse and neglect by offering services that promote child safety and family stability, in which she spent time with children and helped distribute Christmas gifts.

Schluntz, a 2010 Rhodes Scholar, will study at Oxford University and specifically research the viability of harnessing tidal energy from the oceans to use as a renewable resource. She was a finalist for the NCAA Walter Byers Postgraduate Scholarship and the NCAA Postgraduate Scholarship. The University of Arizona presented Schluntz with the Robie Medal at commencement, which is given to a student who exhibits “promise for the future.”

Schluntz was an NCAA National Champion for the 200- and 400-meter medley relay two consecutive years and was named to the Pac-10 First Team All-Academic Swim Team for three consecutive years. A 16-time NCAA All-American, she helped Arizona win the 2008 Division I women’s team championship.

In addition to being named Athletics Academic Champion and Distinguished Scholar, she was named the Athletics Valedictorian at Arizona.

Last year’s NCAA Woman of the Year was Lacey Nymeyer, also a former swimming student-athlete and teammate of Schluntz at Arizona.

 

Nine finalists are trying to succeed 2009 honoree Lacey Nymeyer as the NCAA Woman of the Year.

September 30, 2010

The NCAA has selected nine finalists for the 2010 Woman of the Year award.

The Woman of the Year award honors female student-athletes who have distinguished themselves throughout their collegiate career in the areas of academic achievement, athletics excellence, community service and leadership.

A committee of representatives from NCAA schools and conferences selected the top nine finalists from a pool of 30 honorees. Those individuals were identified from an initial pool of 452 conference and independent honorees representing all three NCAA divisions and multiple sports.

The NCAA Committee on Women's Athletics will select the national winner. The recipient of the 20th annual award will be announced during the 2010 NCAA Woman of the Year awards event, to be held Oct. 17 in the Indiana Convention Center's 500 Ballroom. 

Woman of the Year finalists include:

Division I

 

Lisa Koll, Iowa State University

Conference: Big 12 Conference
Major: Biology
Sports: Cross Country, Indoor and Outdoor Track and Field
Excerpt from personal statement: “I have learned there is no substitute for passion or teamwork and that being a part of something greater than one’s self is unsurpassed in its ability to generate connections between people.”
Koll, a cross country and indoor and outdoor track and field student-athlete, was the first woman to win four straight Big 12 Conference titles in the same event (10,000 from 2007-2010). Koll is the all-time women's collegiate record holder in the 10,000 meters (31:18:07), and the fifth person to win the national title in both the 5,000 and 10,000 meters, the same year, a record that hadn't been touched since 1998.
Koll graduated summa cum laude with a bachelor's degree in biology. While a student at Iowa State, she was ranked in the highest two percent in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences during her sophomore, junior and senior years.
A seven-time Big 12 First-Team Academic All-Conference recipient, Koll was named the Women's Division I Outdoor Track Scholar-Athlete of the Year in 2008. She served three years as team captain and regularly participates in motivational and outreach presentations for youth.

Brittany Rogers, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa 
Conference: Southeastern Conference
Major: Elementary Education
Sport: Softball
Excerpt from personal statement: “It would be inaccurate to claim I am the person I am today purely by my own exertion, for I am simply a piece of the puzzle, a representation of the incredible mentors I encountered in my lifetime.”
A four-time all-SEC First Team member, Rogers was named the 2006 SEC Freshman of the Year and selected for the SEC All-Tournament Team. In addition, Rogers was selected to the SEC All-Defensive Team for two consecutive years and was a top- 25 finalist for the USA Softball Player of the Year. Her team made appearances in the 2008 and 2009 Women's College World Series and she was named to the 2009 Women's College World Series All-Tournament Team. She was also named a National Fastpitch Coaches Association First Team All-American in 2008.
Rogers' community service involvement includes three years of coordinating the Alabama softball team's Project Angel Tree, and the Halloween Extravaganza for local children. Rogers also remains active in the community by speaking to young softball players and youth at various elementary schools.
Rogers, a recipient of the Arthur Ashe Sports Scholar award, and an NCAA Postgraduate Scholarship, has appeared on the University of Alabama's President's List and Dean's List multiple times. An elementary education major, she was a member of the campus Student-Athlete Advisory Committee for three years and served as the organization's president for 2008-09.

Justine Schluntz, University of Arizona
Conference:
Pacific-10 Conference
Major: Mechanical Engineering
Sport: Swimming and Diving
Excerpt from personal statement: “Studying engineering as a female generated many challenges, but by working through these, I learned to persevere in the face of adversity in any setting.”
After suffering a season-ending injury her freshman year, Justine Schluntz began to mentor younger athletes and get involved in the community around her. Justine has volunteered for Big Brothers/Big Sisters for two years, taught swim lessons to children and volunteered with Casa de los Ninos, in which she spent time with children and helped distribute Christmas gifts.
Schluntz, a 2010 Rhodes Scholar, will research the viability of harnessing tidal energy from the oceans to use as a renewable resource at Oxford University. She was a finalist for the Walter Byers Postgraduate Scholarship and the NCAA Postgraduate Scholarship. The University of Arizona presented Schluntz with the Robie Medal at commencement, which is given to a student who exhibits “promise for the future.”
Schluntz was an NCAA National Champion for the 200- and 400-meter medley relay two consecutive years and was named to the Pac-10 First Team All-Academic Swim Team for three consecutive years. A 16-time NCAA all-American, she helped Arizona win the 2008 Division I women's team championship.
In addition to being named Athletics Academic Champion and Distinguished Scholar, she was named the Athletics Valedictorian at the University of Arizona and graduated summa cum laude.

Division II

Lyndsay McBride, University of Indianapolis
Conference:
Great Lakes Valley Conference
Major: Graphic Design
Sport: Golf
Excerpt from personal statement: “If you would have told me my freshman year that I would become a national champion and an All-American, start a non-profit organization or go to Africa, I would have laughed. I have learned how much you can accomplish just by taking all the little steps to get where you want to be, inch by inch.”
McBride is the co-founder of Inches International which is an effort to raise money for scholarships to support schools and hospitals in Liberia and Sierra Leone. The idea to create the nonprofit was conceived after McBride and a classmate traveled to Liberia to assist in the building of a school.
Chosen as the Freshman Art Student of the Year, McBride has used her artwork to raise $34,000 for the Elkhart Women's Care Center. McBride was selected to the GLVC Academic All-Conference Team, and to the University of Indianapolis dean's list her freshman, sophomore, junior and senior years.
McBride, a recipient of the H. Merrill Underwood Art Department Scholarship, was 2009 NCAA Division II women?s golf national champion and the 2010 GLVC Women's Golfer of the Year. She was a member of the campus Student-Athlete Advisory Committee, serving as the women?s golf student-athlete representative.

Mary Slinger, Concordia University, St. Paul 
Conference:
Northern Sun Intercollegiate League
Major: Biology
Sport: Volleyball
Excerpt from personal statement: “Trust humanity—I believe trust to be the most important transferrable quality that I gained via sports. I leave many aspects of my life up to faith and believe to be better because of it.”
Slinger owns the title for the most all-time digs in Concordia's history, finishing her career with 2,349 digs. A member of the Concordia volleyball team that was NCAA Division II champion in 2007, 2008 and 2009, Slinger was a 2009 American Volleyball Coaches Association First Team All-American and voted NSIL Libero of the Year three times.
She participated in two service trips – one to Guatemala and the other to Nicaragua. Slinger was a member of the Tetra Delta Science Club for four years during which she served stints as vice president and president.
A recipient of an NSIC Myles Brand All-Academic with Distinction Award, Slinger also received the Willis R. Kelly Scholar Athlete award which is provided to the NSIC top female student-athlete. A dean's list student, Slinger was a President's Scholarship recipient 2006-10 and a 2009 First Team Academic All-American.

Natalja Stanski, Grand Valley State University
Conference:
Great Lakes Intercollegiate Athletic Conference 
Major: Biomedical Science
Sport: Soccer
Excerpt from personal statement: “Throughout my four years in college, I have been privileged enough to enjoy numerous experiences that have greatly shaped the person I am today. As an athlete in particular, I learned a lot about my ability to persevere, as my struggles with injuries allowed me to test the limits of my fortitude.”
A 2009 NCAA Elite 88 Award recipient, Stanski was a Metropolitan Hospital Child Life volunteer, tutored other student-athletes in math and science at the Student Support Center, was a member of Athetes Who Care, and was named to the Grand Valley State dean's list all four years.
Stanski received the GLIAC Commissioner's Award in 2008 and 2009 and was the Becky Wilson Award Winner for Academic Excellence (soccer) in 2008 and 2009. She was named 2009 ESPN the Magazine Scholar Athlete of the Year (First Team Academic All-American). In addition, Stanski was named to the 2007, 2008 and 2009 GLIAC All-Academic Team.
A defender and team captain, Stanski was a member of Grand Valley State's 2009 NCAA Division II national championship team.

Division III

Hannah Baker, Wartburg College
Conference:
Iowa Intercollegiate Athletic Conference 
Major: Biology 
Sports: Indoor and Outdoor Track and Field
Excerpt from personal statement: “…I have had the privilege of working alongside individuals with varying backgrounds and beliefs. This opportunity has shown me the value of diversity and challenge of utilizing various leadership styles toward a common goal.”
A three-year member of the conference Student-Athlete Advisory Committee who served as president in 2009-10, Baker received an NCAA Student-Athlete Leadership Award for co-leading, designing and organizing Kids' Day 'n Knight Multi-Sport Clinic.
Chosen as the Class of 2010 graduation speaker at Wartburg, Baker was a three-year team captain, represented her school at the NCAA Regional Leadership Conference and received an NCAA Postgraduate Scholarship.
She was a four-time national champion in the 4x400 meters, claiming the 2007, 2008 and 2009 outdoor championships and 2009 indoor championship in that event. Baker was named to the CoSIDA/ESPN the Magazine Academic All-American First Team in 2009.

Melissa Mackley, Gustavus Adolphus College
Conference:
Minnesota Intercollegiate Athletic Conference 
Major: Biology
Sport: Ice Hockey
Excerpt from personal statement: “Becoming an active student leader has propelled me to discover my passions. I have developed a sense of creativity and innovation, skills that I have used to aid others in finding their passions.”
A Habitat for Humanity volunteer and four-year member of Tri-Beta Biological Honor Society, Mackley is a recipient of the NCAA Postgraduate Scholarship and made the Gustavus Adolphus dean's list every semester.
A member of Gustavus Adolphus' 2010 Division III women's ice hockey semifinals team (third-place game), Mackley was a two-time team captain, was named to the CoSIDA/ESPN the Magazine Academic All-America First Team, and is a four-time MIAC conference champion. She was named to the All-Conference First Team in 2008-09 and 2009-10, was selected to the MIAC All-Rookie Team in 2006-07, and was awarded MIAC Player of the Week honors twice in 2008-09 and once in 2009-10.
The Gustavus Adolphus Student-Athlete of the Month for January 2009 and February 2010, Mackley was named to the American Hockey Coaches Association All-America First Team in 2008-09 and 2009-10 and received her team's Most Valuable Player Award in 2008-09 and 2009-10.

Ruth Westby, Emory University 
Conference:
University Athletic Association
Major: Environmental Science/Political Science
Sport: Swimming and Diving
Excerpt from personal statement: “The opportunity for a balanced experience at Emory appealed to me. I worked unconditionally in the pool but actually spent most of my time in the library, and while my teammates became my family, I loved meeting people who were dedicated in other ways.”
A five-time NCAA champion in the 50-meter freestyle in 2008, 200- and 800-meter freestyle relays in 2009, and 200- and 400-meter freestyle relays in 2010, Westby was also named a seven-time all-American in 2010 and was the most decorated swimmer in school history with 27 All-American certificates out of 28 possible events.
Westby was named to the dean's list four times and was twice selected a team captain. She received an NCAA Postgraduate Scholarship and volunteered for the Special Olympics. She was also a 100 Senior honoree, awarded by the Emory Alumni Association for up to 100 students in the senior class for being excellent models of citizenship and leadership.
Among her other activities, she mentored incoming freshmen at Emory, participated in fund-raising for the Court-Appointed Special Advocate Association and Cystic Fibrosis, served on a committee for Relay for Life, took part in the Emory Ethics Department's Summer Servant Leadership program and studied community conservancies during a month-long trip to Africa.

 

2009 NCAA Woman of the Year

 

Arizona's Nymeyer named Woman of the Year

By Leilana McKindra, The NCAA News, October 19, 2009

Lacey Nymeyer - 2009 NCAA Woman of the Year

Former Arizona swimming standout and Olympic silver medalist Lacey Nymeyer has been chosen as the 2009 NCAA Woman of the Year.

Nymeyer accepted the award – among the NCAA’s most prestigious honors – during the 19th annual NCAA Woman of the Year event Sunday night in Indianapolis. The award honors female student-athletes who have completed their eligibility, demonstrated academic and athletics excellence, and engaged in community service and leadership opportunities.

In accepting the award, Nymeyer congratulated the other honorees and thanked her parents, coach and the university. She also thanked the NCAA for providing an opportunity to acknowledge women not only as athletes, but as people.

Nymeyer called the Woman of the Award a culmination of all she’s done and accomplished so far.

“This award is the accumulation of everything,” she said. “It’s not just athletics, academics or my community. It’s everything. It portrays me as a person. This is who I am and this is what I do. To be able to be spotlighted for the balanced lifestyle I’ve worked so hard to put together, I think that’s what makes it so grand. It spotlights me as a person. That’s why it’s so special.”

A committee of representatives from NCAA schools and conferences selected nine finalists – three form each division – from a pool of 30 honorees. Those individuals were identified from an initial pool of 132 conference and independent nominees from all three NCAA divisions and multiple sports. The NCAA Committee on Women’s Athletics chose Nymeyer as the national winner. 

Nymeyer, from Tucson, is the third Arizona student-athlete and sixth swimming student-athlete to be named NCAA Woman of the Year. She represents the Pacific-10 Conference.

Since graduating from Arizona, Nymeyer has continued to train and compete and is eyeing a second Olympic berth in 2012 in London. In the meantime, beyond substitute teaching and leading swimming clinics, Nymeyer spends much of her time with public speaking, particularly to youth groups. She said it keeps her motivated in the pool.

“When you’re in college you swim for a purpose, and for the pride and tradition of your school, but when you’re done with that and you’re only swimming for yourself, it’s hard to be motivated at times,” she said. “When I can go and talk to kids and try to inspire them to their dreams, it’s tenfold on me. It inspires me. I see their excitement and it excites me.”

After she retires from swimming, Nymeyer aspires to enter teaching full-time. Whenever that day comes, Nymeyer said she will rely on the powerful experience of having been an NCAA student-athlete.

“I can honestly say in the last five years – through hard times, through good times – I have no regrets about any of the decisions I’ve made: going to the University of Arizona, making sacrifices for my sport, dedicating myself to my studies,” she said.

“I feel like I have been offered so many opportunities by being a student-athlete that have really influenced the way I perceived the world and where I want my path to go in the future. Being a student-athlete, you see that there’s so much more to life out there and it gives you hope and excitement for the future.”

Nymeyer helped lead Arizona to the 2008 NCAA Division I women’s swimming and diving national championship and captured a silver medal in the 400-meter freestyle relay at the 2008 Olympic Games in Beijing. A two-time Pac-10 swimmer of the year and 26-time all-American, Nymeyer also owns individual NCAA national titles in the 100-yard freestyle and 200-yard freestyle.

The physical education major was a first-team all-Pac-10 pick and a four-time University of Arizona Academic Champion. Away from the pool, she visited Haven House for Women and Casa De Los Ninos House for Children as part of team service projects. In addition to teaching swimming lessons to 5- to 9-year-olds, Nymeyer spoke at middle schools and youth sports banquets.

 

Q&A with Lacey Nymeyer

Would you have picked yourself as the NCAA Woman of the Year?

No. After meeting the girls and spending yesterday and today with them, I was blown away by the type of character they have and what amazing women are in this country. By getting to know them, I was really humbled by how much they’ve accomplished. It’s just a great honor, and I think this award really does represent all women very well, and especially these women.

The Woman of the Year award is designed to elevate female student-athlete nationally. Does it achieves this goal?

For sure. I think as women, especially in today’s society, there are definitely some hard stereotypes, especially with female athletics. I love how this award really does spotlight women not just as athletes or not just as a pretty face, but there is substance behind us and there is a purpose that we have here. Being a woman, you serve a greater cause in the community and you can have just a phenomenal impact on people’s lives. I think this award definitely spotlights that.

What’s the best advice you would share with other current and aspiring female student-athletes?

My coach always talks about things you should put your energy into. There are two aspects he talks about that we are in complete control of at all times: our effort and our focus. It doesn’t matter if it’s your effort and focus toward school, it doesn’t matter if it’s your effort and focus toward athletics or what you’re doing in the community, that’s what you’re in control of at all times. Especially growing up, being a teenager, in today’s world there are so many times when you don’t feel in control, you feel like you’re being acted upon. But to realize that I was always in control of those two things – they are mine and no one could take those away. That was the best advice.

Who are your role models?

Obviously my parents. They were great supports to me and examples to me of how to live a life that is not just for the quick pleasures or instant gratification or satisfaction, but really working hard toward the bigger goal and having a long-term dream. Also, my coach, Frank Bush, for what he has done not only for the program at the University of Arizona, but in my life, and how he has really taken an extra effort to help develop me as a person and not just as a swimmer.

What’s the best part about being an NCAA student-athlete?

The best part of being an NCAA student-athlete is competing for your college. Especially in the sport of swimming, where it is so individual, the opportunity you can have to swim for a greater cause, a bigger purpose, and to share that joy with a team, is very special. Also being a student-athlete puts sports in perspective. So many times, sports gets this skewed portrayal of winning and losing and what your stats are. You can get lost in it. When you compete in college and you watch college athletics, you know that those athletes, yes, they care about athletics, but they are being held accountable in the classroom, too. They are being held to higher expectations than just the normal athletes. They have other goals and purposes and it’s a whole human transformation that can happen through those four years, not just athletically.

 

NCAA names Woman of the Year semifinalists

The NCAA News, August 20, 2009

The NCAA has selected the top 30 honorees for the 2009 NCAA Woman of the Year award that will be presented in October.

The NCAA Woman of the Year Award honors senior women student-athletes who have excelled in the areas of academic achievement, athletics, service and leadership.

A committee composed of representatives from NCAA member schools and conferences selected the top 30 honorees – 10 from each division – from a pool of 132 conference nominees, which included seven student-athletes from independent institutions, representing all three NCAA divisions and multiple sports.

The top 30 will be trimmed to nine finalists – three from each division – next month and the NCAA Committee on Women’s Athletics will select the national winner from that pool of finalists. The recipient of the 19th annual award will be announced during the 2009 NCAA Woman of the Year awards dinner on October 18 in Indianapolis.

The 2008 NCAA Woman of the Year was Tennessee women’s basketball standout Nkolika Anosike.

2009 NCAA Woman of the Year finalists:

Division 1
Conference Name Institution Sport(s)
ACC Amanda Blumenherst Duke Golf
Big East Jennifer Kleinhans Connecticut Field hockey
Big Ten Ladia Albertson-Junkans Minnesota Cross country, indoor and outdoor track and field
Big 12 Loren Groves Kansas State Indoor and outdoor track and field
Big 12 Yolanda Odenyo Oklahoma State Soccer
Conference USA Eleanor Waite Rice Cross country, indoor and outdoor track and field
Pac-10 Lacey Nymeyer Arizona Swimming
SEC Ashleigh Clare-Kearney LSU Gymnastics
Summit Laura Hermanson North Dakota State Soccer, cross country, indoor and outdoor track and field
West Coast   Julie Rubenstein Pepperdine Volleyball

 

Division II
Conference Name Institution Sport(s)
California Collegiate Jasimen Bailey   Cal State Stanislaus Indoor and outdoor track and field
California Collegiate Meghan  Haas Cal State San Bernardino Volleyball
GLIAC Kathleen Tafler Grand Valley State Soccer
Great Northwest Ashley Puga Northwest Nazarene Cross country, indoor and outdoor track and field
Heartland Kelsey Yeatts St. Edward’s Soccer
Independent Amie Boles Texas Woman's Gymnastics
Lone Star Emily Brister West Texas A&M Basketball
MIAA Venessa Lee Pittsburg State Cross country, indoor and outdoor track and field
Northeast-10 Kailey Egbert Saint Rose Soccer
South Atlantic Anna Atkinson Wingate Basketball

 

Division III
Conference Name Institution Sport(s)
Centennial Caitlin Mullarkey Swarthmore Basketball, soccer, indoor and outdoor track
IIAC Kelsey Steffens Wartburg Indoor and outdoor track, volleyball
Liberty League Emily Love Vassar Swimming
Midwest Tanesha Hughes Monmouth (Illinois) Basketball, volleyball, indoor and outdoor track
MIAC Katherine Theisen St. Thomas (Minnesota) Cross country, indoor and outdoor track
NESCAC Elise Tropiano Amherst Cross country, indoor and outdoor track
North Coast Tracy Menzel Kenyon Swimming
SCIAC Rebecca Willis Redlands Soccer
SUNYAC Julia Hopson Fredonia State Indoor and outdoor track
UAA Dani Huffman Emory Volleyball

 

NCAA announces Woman of the Year conference winners

The NCAA News, July 30, 2009

More than 100 NCAA student-athletes have earned Woman of the Year recognition from their conferences and will vie for the 2009 NCAA Woman of the Year award that will be presented this fall.

The NCAA Woman of the Year Award honors senior women student-athletes who have excelled in the areas of academic achievement, athletics, service and leadership.

The 132 conference nominees represent all three NCAA divisions and multiple sports. In addition, seven student-athletes from independent institutions also will be considered for the national award.

A committee composed of representatives from NCAA member schools and conferences will select the top 30 – 10 from each division – from the conference and independent nominees. From the top 30 honorees, nine finalists – three from each division – will be chosen. The NCAA Committee on Women’s Athletics will select the national winner from the pool of nine finalists and announce the recipient during the 2009 Woman of the Year dinner on October 18 in Indianapolis.

Tennessee women’s basketball standout Nkolika Anosike was the 2008 NCAA Woman of the Year.

 

2008 NCAA Woman of the Year

 

Tennessee’s Anosike selected as NCAA Woman of the Year

The NCAA News, October 20, 2008

2008 NCAA Woman of the Year - Nkolika Anosike

Nkolika “Nicky” Anosike, a self-described role player for the two-time defending NCAA champion Tennessee Lady Vols basketball team, was named the 2008 NCAA Woman of the Year at the October 19 awards banquet in Indianapolis.

Anosike’s mother, Ngozi Anosike, and Tennessee head coach Pat Summitt accepted the award on Nicky’s behalf. She plays professionally in Israel and was unable to attend the ceremony.

Anosike, a versatile post player for the Lady Vols who was part of the school’s most heralded recruiting class in 2004 that included Candace Parker and Alexis Hornbuckle, finished her UT career with more than 1,000 points and 800 rebounds. She also was one of just four Lady Vols (joining Parker, Chamique Holdsclaw and Tamika Catchings) to amass more than 600 points, 500 rebounds, 100 blocks, 100 steals and 125 assists during her four years.

Anosike said the award was the best honor she has received, simply because it represents the balance being a student-athlete requires. “The award is about being well-rounded, both academically and athletically,” she said in a videotaped message. “It’s something that is a testament to my life and to the dedication my mom showed when I was growing up.”

Ngozi Anosike raised eight children on her own, coming to the United States from Nigeria with just a sixth-grade education. The family lived on welfare and public assistance for several years, but Ngozi has gone on to earn a college degree, become a registered nurse and move the family out of the projects.

In accepting the award on her daughter’s behalf, Ngozi had a message for any young girl who doubts whether she can achieve. “If I can do it, so can you,” she said. Then, after staring at the award and recognizing her daughter’s accomplishments, she said, “Today, happiness is mine.”

Summit called Anosike “the most focused student-athlete I’ve had, and as most of you know, I’ve been at this for a while now.”

She recalled visiting the Anosike family and listening to Nicky review the schools other than Tennessee she was considering when her mother said, “No, no, no … you will play for coach Summitt.”

Summitt called Anosike’s mother “an awesome role model” and noted that all the Woman of the Year honorees are “special to society for the impact they will have on others.”

Anosike completed a triple major in political science, legal studies and sociology in four years in Knoxville while winning two national titles, one Southeastern Conference regular-season title and three SEC tournament championships during her Lady Vols career.

Beyond helping Tennessee women’s basketball put its indelible stamp on NCAA history, Anosike believes the program has made a significant contribution to advancing women’s sports.

“We are probably the most televised women’s basketball team in the nation and probably in the history of women’s sports, which is huge for growing the game and the awareness of women’s sports overall,” she said when informed of being a finalist.

Anosike isn’t done making her own mark. She has been accepted into the Teach For America program, a national corps of recent college graduates who commit two years to teaching in urban and rural public schools, as a way of furthering her passion for leadership and desire to make a difference. Though she has deferred entering the program while she continues her professional basketball career (she played for the WNBA’s Minnesota Lynx in 2008), Anosike in the meantime plans to use her stature as an athlete to advocate for children living in poverty.

As Anosike embraces her new role as the latest recipient of one of the NCAA’s most prestigious awards, she encouraged aspiring athletes, and particularly young women, to never doubt themselves.

“There are going to be people who tell you that you can’t do it, but if you work hard and set goals for yourself – and strive to achieve those goals – then just like me, you can make it to a school like the University of Tennessee,” she said.

The annual Woman of the Year award, now in its 18th year, recognizes outstanding female student-athletes who have excelled in academics, athletics, leadership and service. A committee composed of representatives from NCAA member schools and conferences selected the top 30 – 10 from each division – from 130 conference and independent nominees. From the 30 honorees, nine finalists – three from each division – were chosen. The NCAA Committee on Women’s Athletics selected Anosike from the nine finalists.

The top 30 honorees were at the banquet, including the following eight finalists.

 

Nine finalists selected for 18th NCAA Woman of the Year

The NCAA News, October 1, 2008

The NCAA has named the nine finalists for the 18th annual NCAA Woman of the Year award.

This year’s top nine honorees are:

  • Susan Ackermann, Salisbury (lacrosse), Capital Athletic Conference
  • Nkolika Anosike, Tennessee (basketball),Southeastern Conference
  • Jennifer Artichuk, Delta State (swimming and diving), Independent
  • Shanti Freitas, Smith (swimming and diving), New England Women’s and Men’s Athletic Conference
  • Arianna Lambie, Stanford (cross country, track and field), Pacific-10 Conference
  • Samantha Mitchell, Mount Olive (volleyball, track and field), Conference Carolinas
  • Lindsey Ozimek, Charlotte (soccer), Atlantic 10 Conference
  • Sarah Schettle, Wisconsin-Oshkosh (track and field, cross country, swimming), Wisconsin Intercollegiate Athletic Conference
  • Heather Walker, Georgian Court (volleyball, softball), Central Atlantic Collegiate Conference

The award recognizes accomplished NCAA female student-athletes who have excelled in athletics, academics, service and leadership. The NCAA Committee on Women’s Athletics will name a national winner from among the top nine finalists at the annual awards dinner October 19 in Indianapolis.

Whitney Myers, a former swimming student-athlete at Arizona, was the 2007 Woman of the Year.

Following are some of the achievements of this year’s finalists:

 

Susan Ackermann, Salisbury, lacrosse

Academic achievements: Graduated in May 2008 with a 3.91 GPA; majored in exercise science with minors in marketing management and business administration. Capital Athletic Conference Women’s Scholar Athlete of the Year, 2008. Salisbury Female Scholar Athlete of the Year, 2008. Intercollegiate Women's Lacrosse Coaches Association (IWLCA) Division III Scholar Athlete of the Year, 2008. ESPN The Magazine Women’s At-large Academic all-American of the Year, 2008.

Athletics achievements: All-time leader in career goals and assists at Salisbury. IWLCA, Inside Lacrosse and womenslacrosse.com first-team all-American. Two-time conference player of the year. Winner of the Maryland Association of College Directors of Athletics postgraduate scholarship. Inside Lacrosse Athlete of the Year.

Service and leadership: Campus Student-Athlete Advisory Committee, 2005-08. Soccer and basketball manager, 2005-08. Senior Games volunteer, 2006-08. Vice president of national leadership honor society Omicron Delta Kappa, 2007-08.

Excerpt from personal statement: “Competing in athletics at the college level has prepared me with great time management, leadership and teamwork skills. I learned to stay poised under the pressure of simultaneously preparing for tests, presentations, practices and games. My leadership abilities flourished in college in being a two-time team captain as well as holding officer positions in academic groups.

 

Nkolika Anosike, Tennessee, basketball

Academic achievements: Graduated in May 2008 with a triple major in political science, legal studies and sociology. SEC Academic Honor Roll, 2005-08. ESPN The Magazine Academic All-American second-team, 2007-08. Boyd McWhorter Postgraduate Scholarship winner for Tennessee, 2008.

Athletics achievements: Two-time NCAA Women’s Final Four all-tournament team selection. Member of one SEC regular-season and three SEC tournament championship teams. Twice led the Lady Vols in blocked shots. Member of the two USA U19 Women’s Basketball World Championship teams and the 2007 USA Pan-American team. Drafted into the WNBA by the Minnesota Lynx.

Service and leadership: Team captain, 2007-08. Campus Student-Athlete Advisory Committee, 2007-08. Volunteer for the East Tennessee Children’s Hospital, elementary school career day, Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure and Lady Vol Fund Run.

Excerpt from personal statement: “Leadership through example makes a difference. I have had opportunities to learn this lesson, most recently as I helped lead the Lady Vols basketball team to its eighth national championship. I was not the superstar; I did the unglamorous work that wins games and brings success in life. Some of our most effective leaders are not in the spotlight but lead by example through hard work and dedication. This assertion reflects who I am and what I hope to become.”

 

Jennifer Artichuk, Delta State, swimming and diving

Academic achievements: Graduated in May 2008 with a 3.87 GPA; majored in accounting. Three-time College Swim Coaches Association academic all-American. Three-time New South Intercollegiate Swim Conference (NSISC) academic all-conference selection. Recipient of the Reynolds-Chiz Scholarship in Accountancy, 2007-08.

Athletics achievements: Delta State Charles S. Kerg Senior Athlete of the Year, 2008. Four-time all-NSISC pick. Holds the NSISC record in the 200-meter butterfly and the school record in the 100-meter and 200-meter butterfly. Three-time first-team all-American. Team captain, 2006-08. Two-time NSISC champion.

Service and leadership: Student-Athlete Advisory Committee, 2006-08. President of the Student Accountant Board of Administrators and the Business Students Advisory Committee. Youth mentor for the Cleveland (Mississippi) Youth Mentor program, 2005-08. Covenant Presbyterian Church Nursery Worker, 2005-08. Participated in the Delta Aquatic Club Mentor program.

Excerpt from personal statement: “Being a student-athlete taught me discipline, time management and built my character. It is not easy being in the pool four hours a day, in class all day, working at night, and still finding time to get my homework done. Knowing that I had to be successful in these endeavors to reach my goals kept me going and kept me strong.”

 

Shanti Freitas, Smith, swimming and diving

Academic achievements: Sociology major with minors in education and child study who graduated in May 2008. Three-time academic all-American. NEWMAC academic all-conference selection, 2006 and 2008. Dean’s List, 2005-06. Seven Sisters Scholar-Athlete Award, 2008.

Athletics achievements: Three-time Seven Sisters diving champion. Three-time all-American diver. First-team all-NEWMAC selection. NCAA Leadership Conference participant, 2005. Rookie of the Year, Sophomore Athlete of the Year and Senior Athlete of the Year at Smith. Team captain, 2007-08.

Service and leadership: Associate director of Best Buddies program. Student mentor at an after-school program. Campus Student-Athlete Advisory Committee, 2005-06. Volunteered at La Case de la Mujer, a domestic violence project in Ecuador, while studying abroad. Served as an outreach intern for Engaging Latino Families in Education, 2007.

Excerpt from personal statement: “Having to constantly divide my time carefully between academics, athletics and extracurricular activities, I have learned that staying organized is essential to being able to manage my time well and accomplish all that I need and want to do. However, more than good habits and life skills in time management, the most important lessons I have learned from being a student-athlete come from interactions with my classmates, teammates, and coaches.”

 

Arianna Lambie, Stanford , cross country/track and field

Academic achievements: Graduated in May 2008; majored in Earth Systems. Three-time first-team academic all-American. CoSIDA University Division all-American Track and Field and Cross Country Athlete of the Year. Recipient of the Al Masters Award, presented annually to the Stanford student-athlete attaining the highest standards of athletic performance, leadership and academic achievement.

Athletics achievements: Member of four Division I cross country national championship teams. Four-time cross country and three-time track and field all-American. Member of four indoor and four outdoor Pac-10 championship teams. Pac-10 Cross Country Athlete of the Year, 2005, 2006 and 2007. Competed in the 2008 U.S. Olympic Trails. Track team captain, 2007.

Service and leadership: Pac-10 Sportsmanship Award winner, 2008. Served as president of the Science and Environmental Education program, 2006-08. Habitat for Humanity and Special Olympics volunteer. School of Earth Sciences Graduate Student Advisory Committee, 2007-08.

Excerpt from personal statement: “Nothing taught me the worth of listening to mind, body and other people’s needs as did running at Stanford. With patience has come the equally invaluable acquisition of perspective. Stanford’s encouragement to pour myself into each of my several passions at the appropriate times has been one of the greatest gifts the school provided.”

 

Samantha Mitchell, Mount Olive, volleyball/track and field

Academic achievements: Psychology major who graduated in May 2008. NCAA Postgraduate Scholarship recipient, 2008. Mount Olive Athletics Department Honor Roll 2004-08. Conference Carolinas Presidential Honor Roll, 2004-08. Conference Carolinas Academic All-Conference, 2007-08.

Athletics achievement: American Volleyball Coaches Association regional all-American, 2008. Conference Carolinas Volleyball Player of the Year, 2007. Three-time first team all-conference selection in volleyball. Established school record for career digs and ranked second in career kills. 2008. Captain of outdoor track and field in the program’s inaugural season of competition, 2008. Mount Olive’s Most Outstanding Female Student-Athlete, 2008.

Service and leadership: National Student-Athlete Advisory Committee. NCAA National Leadership Conference participant. Psychology Honor Society. Intern of North Carolina Department of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. Volunteer for Cystic Fibrosis, Breast Cancer Awareness, and youth basketball camps.

Excerpt from personal statement: “Being a student-athlete has shaped my entire being as a person. It has taught me some of the most valuable lessons about life. Athletics have equipped me with the attributes needed for success in my relationships, academics, career and even in building my character. Athletics has taught me how to transfer what I do in the classroom and on the court to my everyday life by communicating effectively and displaying my leadership abilities.”

 

Lindsey Ozimek, Charlotte, soccer

Academic achievements: Special education major who graduated in June 2008. Three-time ESPN The Magazine academic all-American. Four-time academic all-America and three-time Atlantic 10 all-academic team selection. Atlantic 10 Scholar-Athlete of the Year, 2007-08. Recipient of the Military Order of the Purple Heart Award, highest honor for academic excellence in the university’s education department.

Athletics achievement: Member of the United States Women’s U-20 and U-23 National Teams. First-team all-American. First-team Atlantic 10 all-conference. Member of 2006 conference championship team. Atlantic 10 Midfielder of the Year, 2007. First-team NSCAA/Adidas All-Southeast Region.

Service and leadership: Youth soccer coach and trainer. Soccer camp administrator. Special education teacher. Member of the Student-Athlete Advisory Committee. Designed soccer camps for children with physical and mental disabilities. Team captain, 2005-07.

Excerpt from personal statement: “The growth, personal development and experiences I have gained from being a four-year student athlete at UNCC have undoubtedly served as the vehicle that propelled me to achieving my goals on and off of the field. As team captain, I have evolved into a more confident, assertive, and resilient leader. As a student-athlete, I have been blessed to travel throughout the world to various cities and institutions. These endeavors have allowed me to experience different cultures, nationalities, meet new people, while ultimately forcing me out of my comfort zone.”

 

Sarah Schettle, Wisconsin-Oshkosh, track and field/cross country/swimming and diving

Academic achievements: Chemistry and Spanish double major who graduated in May 2008. Participant in the University Honors Program. NCAA Division III Women’s Outdoor Track and Field All-Academic Team of the Year selection. Academic all-American, 2004-07.

Athletics achievement: Member of three indoor and two outdoor NCAA track and field national championships teams. Two-time indoor track and field All-American. Member of two outdoor track and one indoor conference championship teams.

Service and leadership: NCAA Sportsmanship Award recipient, 2006. Co-founder of eMentors, an online program connecting current students with alumni. Author of undergraduate research published in a scholarly journal, 2007. Nursing home, Special Olympics and blood drive volunteer.

Excerpt from personal statement: “As each athletics season commences, I write goals on index cards and pin them to the ceiling above my bed to remind myself of them at the beginning and close of each day. My senior year I wrote “Have no regrets”—the most important thing I have learned as a student-athlete and the card that will remain on my ceiling. It encompasses why I dedicate myself to taking full advantage of each time I have the opportunity to step on a track, pool deck or enter a classroom.”

 

Heather Walker, Georgian Court, volleyball/softball

Academic achievements: History major who graduated in May 2008. Spring and fall conference all-academic team pick. National Fastpitch Coaches Association All-American Scholar Athlete, 2005-07. Dean’s Scholar, 2004-08.

Athletics achievements: First-team Louisville Slugger/NFCA all-American. CACC Softball Player of the Year, 2007. Two-time Georgian Court Athlete of the Year. Member of one softball and two volleyball conference championship teams. Captain of the softball and volleyball teams, 2005-08.

Service and leadership: National Student-Athlete Advisory Committee. Women in Leadership Development. Elementary school reading volunteer. President of Pi Delta Phi, the French Honor Society, 2006-08.

Excerpt from personal statement: “Through athletics competition, not only have I gained a better appreciation for the game of softball, but I have also gained a better understanding of myself. The amount of time and dedication it takes to be a student-athlete at the Division II level, as well as continually striving to improve myself, has heightened my internal drive which will serve me well as I graduate and pursue new goals. Athletics has provided me the opportunity to interact with a diverse group of people. A simple way to sum up my experience of being a student-athlete at Georgian Court University is that it has been truly transformative.”

 

Woman of the Year nominees chosen

The NCAA News, September 9, 2008

The NCAA announced 130 conference and independent nominees for the 18th annual NCAA Woman of the Year award.

The honor recognizes outstanding female student-athletes who have excelled academically and athletically in addition to demonstrating strong community service and leadership.

Nominees represent all three divisions.

The top 10 honorees in each division will be announced later this month followed by the selection of the top three honorees per division. The NCAA Committee on Women’s Athletics will choose the winner from the top nine honorees, and the 2008 NCAA Woman of the Year will be announced at an awards dinner in Indianapolis on October 19.

To be eligible for this award, the female student-athlete must have earned a varsity letter in an NCAA-sponsored sport and competed during the 2007-08 academic year. In addition, each individual must have completed intercollegiate eligibility in her primary sport by the end of the 2008 spring season and must have a minimum cumulative grade-point average of 2.5.

This year’s conference and independent nominees are:

America East Conference
Dana Hastie
Stony Brook University (Division I) Cross Country, and Indoor and Outdoor Track and Field

America East Conference
Sarah Hudak
Boston University (Division I) Field Hockey

American Southwest Conference
Michelle Heckmann
Concordia University (Texas) (Division III) Volleyball

American Southwest Conference
Tarra Richardson
McMurry University (Division III) Basketball

Atlantic 10 Conference
Sarah-Jo Lawrence
George Washington University (Division I) Basketball

Atlantic 10 Conference
Lindsey Ozimek
University of North Carolina, Charlotte (Division I) Soccer

Atlantic Coast Conference
Kandia Batchelor
Florida State University (Division I) Indoor and Outdoor Track and Field

Atlantic Coast Conference
Jessica Botzum
Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University (Division I) Swimming and Diving

Atlantic Sun Conference
Volha Batsula
East Tennessee State University (Division I) Tennis

Big 12 Conference
Sarah Pavan
University of Nebraska, Lincoln (Division I) Volleyball

Big 12 Conference
Sally Kipyego
Texas Tech University (Division I) Outdoor Track and Field

Big East Conference
Allie Quigley
DePaul University (Division I) Basketball

Big East Conference
Jillian Drouin
Syracuse University (Division I) Indoor and Outdoor Track and Field

Big Ten Conference
Molly Crispell
Pennsylvania State University (Division I) Swimming and Diving

Big Sky Conference
Laura Cote
University of Montana (Division I) Basketball

Big South Conference
Stephanie Reid
Winthrop University (Division I) Softball

Big South Conference
Allyson Fasnacht
Liberty University (Division I) Basketball

Big West Conference
Bethany Nickless
University of California, Santa Barbara (Division I) Cross Country and Outdoor Track and Field

California Collegiate Athletic Association
Katherine Bagwell
California State University, Chico (Division II) Soccer, and Outdoor Track and Field

Capital Athletic Conference Inc
Susan Ackermann
Salisbury University (Division III) Lacrosse

Centennial Conference
Emily Hinchcliff
Haverford College (Division III) Volleyball

Central Atlantic Collegiate Conference
Heather Walker
Georgian Court University (Division II) Softball and Volleyball

Central Intercollegiate Athletic Association
Kim Moore
Shaw University (Division II) Tennis and Volleyball

Central Intercollegiate Athletic Association
Celeste Trahan
Elizabeth City State University (Division II) Basketball

College Conference of Illinois & Wisconsin
Sarah Richardson
Wheaton College (Illinois) (Division III) Soccer

College Hockey America
Ashley King
Wayne State University (Michigan) (Division II) Ice Hockey

Colonial Athletic Association
Megan Moulton-Levy
College of William and Mary (Division I) Tennis

Colonial Athletic Association
Colleen Walsh
University of Delaware (Division I) Volleyball

Commonwealth Conference
Erin Fisher
Elizabethtown College (Division III) Cross Country, and Indoor and Outdoor Track and Field

The Commonwealth Coast Conference
Kacie Gallo
Salve Regina University (Division III) Soccer, and Outdoor Track and Field

Conference Carolinas
Samantha Mitchell
Mount Olive College (Division II) Volleyball and Track and Field

Conference USA
Marissa Daniels
Rice University (Division I) Cross Country, and Indoor and Outdoor Track and Field

Conference USA
Jami Tullius
University of Texas at El Paso (Division I) Soccer

Division III Independents
Holly Andrews
Nebraska Wesleyan University (Division III) Indoor and Outdoor Track and Field

East Coast Conference
Diana Redman
Queens College (New York) (Division II) Soccer, and Indoor Track and Field

Empire 8
Natalia Chabebe
Stevens Institute of Technology (Division III) Fencing

Empire 8
Emily Lesher
Nazareth College (Division III) Swimming and Diving

Great Lakes Intercollegiate Athletic Conference
Rachel Folcik
Ferris State University (Division II) Basketball

Great Lakes Intercollegiate Athletic Conference
Kirby Blackley
University of Findlay (Division II) Indoor and Outdoor Track and Field

Great Lakes Valley Conference
Elizabeth Holmes
Northern Kentucky University (Division II) Volleyball

Great Northeast Athletic Conference
Jillian Leger
Saint Joseph's College (Maine) (Division III) Soccer

Great Northwest Athletic Conference
Courtney Schneider
Western Washington University (Division II) Volleyball

Great Northwest Athletic Conference
Jackie Thomas
Seattle University (Division II) Basketball

Gulf South Conference
Ashton Washington
University of West Alabama (Division II) Basketball

Heartland Conference
Kristen Gascoyne
St. Edward's University (Division II) Soccer

Horizon League
Jessica Weidert
Wright State University (Division I) Swimming and Diving

Independent
Jennifer Artichuk
Delta State University (Division II) Swimming

Independent
Dena Baskous
New Jersey Institute of Technology (Division II) Soccer

Independent
Courtney Arno-Templet
Texas Woman's University (Division II) Gymnastics

Independent
Sheralyn Briggs
University at Buffalo, the State University of New (Division I) Rowing

Independent
Aiesha Brown
North Carolina Central University (Division II) Cross Country, and Indoor and Outdoor Track and Field

Independent
Elizabeth Enyart
U.S. Air Force Academy (Division I) Fencing

Independent
Faith Greenawalt
Tiffin University (Division II) Tennis

Independent
Jennifer Hukill
North Carolina Central University (Division II) Basketball

Independent
Meghann Morrill
University of Nevada, Reno (Division I) Rifle

Independent
Ashley Postell
University of Utah (Division I) Gymnastics

Iowa Intercol. Athletic Conf.
Ashley Rogers
Wartburg College (Division III) Softball and Volleyball

Ivy Group
Jesse Carlin
University of Pennsylvania (Division I) Indoor and Outdoor Track and Field

Ivy Group
Sarah Wu
Brown University (Division I) Rowing

Landmark Conference
Emily Blatter
Goucher College (Division III) Lacrosse

Liberty League
Nicole Tetreault
Hamilton College (Division III) Lacrosse and Soccer

Little East Conference
Christie Lotti
Rhode Island College (Division III) Softball

Lone Star Conference
Rachel Ingram
Southwestern Oklahoma State University (Division II) Cross Country

Massachusetts State College Athletic Conference
Colleen Feeney
Bridgewater State College (Division III) Basketball

Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference
Brittany Bisnott
Niagara University (Division I) Soccer

Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference
Jaclyn O'Leary
Iona College (Division I) Lacrosse

Michigan Intercollegiate Athletic Association
Sarah Wittingen
Calvin College (Division III) Outdoor Track and Field

Mid-American Conference
Stephanie Swiger
Bowling Green State University (Division I) Volleyball

Mid-America Intercollegiate Athletics Association
Jill Johnson
Missouri Western State University (Division II) Basketball

Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference
Morgan Maxwell
Howard University (Division I) Women’s Volleyball

Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference
Jessica Worsley
University of Maryland, Eastern Shore (Division I) Bowling

Midwest Conference
Ashley Yeast
Monmouth College (Illinois) (Division III) Basketball and Volleyball

Minnesota Intercollegiate Athletic Conference
Maria Bye
University of St. Thomas (Minnesota) (Division III) Softball

Missouri Valley Conference
Sara Lungren
Wichita State University (Division I) Volleyball

Mountain West Conference
Chelsea Goodman
Brigham Young University (Division I) Volleyball

Mountain West Conference
Dionne Marsh
University of New Mexico (Division I) Basketball

New England Small College Athletic Conference
Grace Moore
Bowdoin College (Division III) Lacrosse and Soccer

New England Women's & Men's Athletic Conference
Doria Holbrook
Massachusetts Institute of Technology (Division III) Swimming and Diving

New England Women's & Men's Athletic Conference
Shanti Freitas
Smith College (Division III) Swimming

New Jersey Athletic Conference

Lizzelle Cintron
New Jersey City University (Division III) Volleyball

New Jersey Athletic Conference

Jackie Ferranti
Montclair State University (Division III) Softball

North Central Intercollegiate Athletic Conference
Jill Smolczyk
University of South Dakota (Division II) Swimming and Diving

North Central Intercollegiate Athletic Conference
Ashley Homan
St. Cloud State University (Division II) Softball

North Atlantic Conference
Rebecca Allen
Maine Maritime Academy (Division III) Volleyball

North Coast Athletic Conference
Erin Gorsich
Denison University (Division III) Tennis

Northeast-10 Conference
Alison Lesher
Le Moyne College (Division II) Swimming and Diving

Northeast Conference
Ann Marie Mangano
Quinnipiac University (Division I) Field Hockey

Northern Athletics Conference
Catherine Chappell
Milwaukee School of Engineering (Division III) Basketball, and Indoor and Outdoor Track and Field

Northern Sun Intercollegiate Conference
Kallie Tellefson
Winona State University (Division II) Soccer

Northern Sun Intercollegiate Conference
Kira Wannebo
Northern State University (Division II) Soccer

Northwest Conference
Sarah Zerzan
Willamette University (Division III) Cross Country, and Outdoor Track and Field

Ohio Valley Conference
Beth Boden
Tennessee Technological University (Division I) Softball

Old Dominion Athletic Conference
Amy Roberson
Washington and Lee University (Division III) Swimming and Diving

Old Dominion Athletic Conference
Kelly Gonzalez
Guilford College (Division III) Lacrosse

Patriot League
Denise Infante
American University (Division I) Field Hockey

Pacific-10 Conference
Arianna Lambie
Stanford University (Division I) Cross Country, and Indoor and Outdoor Track and Field

Pacific West Conference
Sheila Johnson
Grand Canyon University (Division II) Tennis

Patriot League
Christine Smith
Lehigh University (Division I) Field Hockey and Lacrosse

Peach Belt Conference
Amanda Gerolstein
University of South Carolina Aiken (Division II) Volleyball

Peach Belt Conference
Tiara Good
Lander University (Division II) Basketball

The Pennsylvania Athletic Conference
Ericka Morrison
Misericordia University (Division III) Basketball

Pennsylvania State Athletic Conference
Brittany Pikur
Indiana University of Pennsylvania (Division II) Lacrosse and Soccer

Presidents' Athletic Conference
Halley Brus
Chatham University (Division III) Softball, Soccer, and Swimming and Diving

Rocky Mountain Athletic Conference
Nicole Schwab
Fort Lewis College (Division II) Volleyball

Skyline Conference
Jennifer Martinez
St. Joseph's College (Long Island) (Division III) Softball

South Atlantic Conference
Heloisa de Oliveira
Lincoln Memorial University (Division II) Soccer

South Atlantic Conference
Melissa DeLuca
Wingate University (Division II) Volleyball

Southern California Intercollegiate Athletic Conf.
Natalie Calderon
University of Redlands (Division III) Outdoor Track and Field

Southern Collegiate Athletic Conference
Katherine Doogan
DePauw University (Division III) Swimming and Diving

Southern Conference
Brenna Burns
Davidson College (Division I) Cross Country, and Indoor and Outdoor Track and Field

Southern Conference
Alex Anderson
University of Tennessee at Chattanooga (Division I) Basketball

Southeastern Conference
Nkolika Anosike
University of Tennessee, Knoxville (Division I) Basketball

Southeastern Conference
Stacy Lewis
University of Arkansas, Fayetteville (Division I) Golf

Southwestern Athletic Conference
Janna Moore-Calliste
Texas Southern University (Division I) Indoor and Outdoor Track and Field

Southwestern Athletic Conference
Nyasha Chambwe
Jackson State University (Division I) Basketball

St. Louis Intercollegiate Athletic Conference
Emily Forbes
Eureka College (Division III) Softball and Volleyball

State University of New York Athletic Conference
Michelle Coombs
State University College at New Paltz (Division III) Swimming and Diving

The Summit League
Lisa Bue
North Dakota State University (Division II) Basketball

The Summit League
Halee Clark
Oral Roberts University (Division I) Indoor and Outdoor Track and Field

Sun Belt Conference
Rachael Runnels
University of North Texas (Division I) Indoor and Outdoor Track and Field

Sun Belt Conference
Jenna Billingsley
University of Denver (Division I) Soccer

Sunshine State Conference
Virginia Davenport
Saint Leo University (Division II) Soccer

Sunshine State Conference
Alexandra Schunk
Lynn University (Division II) Tennis

University Athletic Association
Esther Erb
Case Western Reserve University (Division III) Cross Country, and Indoor and Outdoor Track and Field

USA South Athletic Conference
Ashley Hay
Christopher Newport University (Division III) Field Hockey

USA South Athletic Conference
Jenee Johnson
Greensboro College (Division III) Softball

Wisconsin Intercollegiate Athletic Conference
Sarah Schettle
University of Wisconsin, Oshkosh (Division III) Cross Country, Swimming and Diving, and Indoor and Outdoor Track and Field

Western Athletic Conference
Melinda Owen
University of Idaho (Division I) Indoor and Outdoor Track and Field

West Coast Conference
Jenna Shay
Pepperdine University (Division I) Soccer

West Coast Conference
Stephanie Cox (Lopez)
University of Portland (Division I) Soccer

Western Collegiate Hockey Association
Bobbi Ross
University of Minnesota, Twin Cities (Division I) Ice Hockey

West Virginia Intercollegiate Athletic Conference
Amanda Lyons
Wheeling Jesuit University (Division II) Soccer

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