University of Georgia

Keturah Orji is the 2018 NCAA Woman of the Year

Former Georgia track and field standout and financial planning major Keturah Orji has been named the 2018 NCAA Woman of the Year.

From There to Here: Carla Williams

When Carla Williams was being recruited to play basketball at Georgia in the mid-1980s, she didn’t even know athletics administrators existed.

Step by Step

The last steps Devon Gales took without the aid of an apparatus or caregiver came in full gallop on a soggy fall Saturday in Georgia.

In her words: Jaleesa Rhoden, former NCAA postgraduate intern

In 2013-14, Jaleesa Rhoden worked within the championships and alliances group, primarily for the Division I Men’s Basketball Championship. A native of London, Ontario, Rhoden attended the University of Georgia, played basketball and was a member of SAAC.

Hitting the Book

Most football players show up at Media Day with confidence and cliches. Malcolm Mitchell brought a book.

2001 NCAA Woman of the Year

 

Woman of the Year continues to draw from Georgia talent pool

The NCAA News, November 5, 2001

 

By Kay Hawes

Kimberly A. Black, 2001 NCAA Woman of the Year

It's becoming a tradition at the University of Georgia. When Georgia swimmer Kimberly A. Black was chosen October 21 as the 2001 NCAA Woman of the Year, it made two winners in a row for the university and also marked the third time in 11 years that a Lady Bulldog from the swim team has taken home the title.

The NCAA Woman of the Year award honors academic and athletics excellence, as well as community service and leadership. Each year the slate of candidates is full of Rhodes Scholar finalists, national champions and tireless volunteers -- often all in the same person.

The latest Woman of the Year from this impressive group had equally stellar credentials. A biology major with a near-perfect grade-point average, Black also was the female winner of the NCAA Walter Byers Scholarship, the highest academic honor given by the Association. A Phi Beta Kappa who has won numerous other academic accolades, Black hopes to serve a stint in South America in the Peace Corps before enrolling in medical school, where she plans to pursue a career in pediatric medicine.

Black also was a member of the gold-medal-winning 800-meter freestyle relay team in the 2000 Olympics in Sydney. Black also competed in the World University Games this summer in Beijing, where she was a member of the 800-meter freestyle relay team that also won a gold medal. A four-time all-American, Black helped the Lady Bulldogs to their third straight NCAA championship and fifth consecutive Southeastern Conference title in 2001.

An active participant in a mentoring program and also a volunteer at schools and hospitals, Black won the 2001 Peach of an Athlete Award given by the Atlanta Boy Scouts of America for her volunteer work. She also won the inaugural Georgia Athletic Association Community Service Award, given to the student-athlete at Georgia selected for outstanding commitment to community service.

Stars of tomorrow

Black accepted the award at the 11th annual NCAA Woman of the Year awards dinner October 21 in Indianapolis.

Among those welcoming attendees were NCAA President Cedric W. Dempsey and Judy Sweet, NCAA senior woman administrator and vice-president for championships.

Sweet reminded the audience that 20 years ago, as these 51 finalists were learning to walk and talk, the NCAA was conducting women's championships for the first time.

"The advent of women's championships within the NCAA structure made 1981 an exciting, challenging and memorable year," Sweet said. "We were looking forward to new opportunities and visibility for female athletes in their journey to NCAA championships and the resulting celebrations, like ours tonight.

"We will take this year to reflect on the great strides we have made to give tonight's honorees, their teammates, coaches and rivals the support for developing their talents and the stage to display them."

Robin Roberts, sports commentator from ESPN and ABC, served as master of ceremonies for the 11th year. Roberts was joined this year by Nell Fortner, head coach and general manager of the WNBA's Indiana Fever.

All 51 of the state finalists are invited to the dinner and introduced to those in attendance, with the 10 finalists introduced by videos highlighting their accomplishments.

The state finalists included a 15-time all-American track star, a volunteer who helped Burmese refugees, a national champion pole vaulter with a perfect grade-point average in molecular biology, several women currently playing professional basketball overseas and a Rhodes Scholar finalist who starred in three sports at her school. There were future teachers, doctors, lawyers, businesswomen and even one aspiring FBI agent.

The winner of the Woman of the Year remains a secret until after all the state finalists are introduced at the dinner. Marilyn McNeil, chair of the NCAA Committee on Women's Athletics, which selects the winner from the 10 finalists once they are chosen from the 51 by another selection committee, made the announcement.

"I don't know how they could choose just one of us," Black said as she accepted, noting the numerous accomplishments of the top 10 finalists. "It's been really inspiring for me to be here and meet so many wonderful people."

'Never stop striving'

Black recalled her experiences as she began to swim at age 8, when her small stature and inefficient stroke made the prospect of pursuing the sport unlikely at best.

"I had a coach tell me that I was one of the least efficient people he had ever seen in the water, and now, at still just 5-6, I've always been pretty short for my sport. But I want the children in the audience here, especially ones here with host families or here because of their participation in the sports spectacular, to know that you can do anything you want if you stick to it long enough and never stop striving."

Black missed making the 1996 Olympic team by only a hundredth of a second. In 2000, she made the team by the same slim margin.

Black encouraged young people to pursue sports to round out their experiences in life.

"Choose something you love," she said, "and you can't lose no matter what. You will meet great people and you will have great experiences."

Black counts her volunteer experience mentoring a girl named Abigail as something that's been beneficial to them both.

"I think of her as a little sister. I was very blessed growing up to have a role model, my brother who is three years older than me. In many ways, I am now Abigail's role model and I can see a direct impact that mentoring has on her," Black said.

"When I began mentoring her, I also didn't realize how much of an effect it would have on me. I am from Syracuse, New York, and Abigail's family has adopted me and made me feel at home in Georgia."

Black credited her coach, Georgia's Jack Bauerle, with setting the right tone for student-athletes at the school.

"Time management is very important, but Jack has always stressed academics," she said. "I think he was just as excited about me winning the Walter Byers Scholarship as he was about me making the Olympic team. That kind of a commitment from a coach really makes a difference."

An edited version of the awards dinner will be shown on ESPN December 11 at 2:30 p.m. Eastern Standard Time.

Last year's national winner was Kristy Kowal, an all-American swimmer and 2000 Olympic silver medalist from Georgia. The first winner from Georgia was the late Lisa Ann Coole, also a swimmer, who won the award in 1997 but was killed in a traffic accident the following year.

Other previous winners are: 1999 -- Jamila Demby, track and field, the University of California, Davis; 1998 -- Peggy Boutilier, lacrosse and field hockey, University of Virginia; 1996 -- Billie Winsett-Fletcher, volleyball, University of Nebraska, Lincoln; 1995 -- Rebecca Lobo, basketball, University of Connecticut; 1994 -- Tanya Jones, track and field, University of Arizona; 1993 --Nnenna Lynch, track and cross country, Villanova University; 1992 -- Catherine Byrne, swimming and diving, University of Tennessee, Knoxville; and 1991 -- Mary Beth Riley, track and field, Canisius College.

 

Finalists:

Woman of the Year finalists exemplify award's attributes

The NCAA News, September 24, 2001

 

Ten finalists have been selected for the 2001 NCAA Woman of the Year award, which recognizes young women for their outstanding achievement in athletics, academics and community service.

The 10 finalists are: Kimberly A. Black, University of Georgia --swimming and diving; Camille Cooper, Purdue University -- basketball; Andrea Dutoit, University of Arizona -- cross country and indoor and outdoor track and field; Kameelah Taliah Elarms, University of California, Davis -- indoor and outdoor track and field; Kristen English, Swarthmore College -- field hockey, basketball and lacrosse; K. Elizabeth Flynt Asti, University of Tennessee, Knoxville -- swimming and diving; Sunny Gilbert, University of Missouri, Columbia -- cross country and indoor and outdoor track and field; Angie Oxley, University of Nebraska, Lincoln -- volleyball; Claire Cunanan Reyes, Longwood College -- field hockey and softball.

The winner will be announced at the annual Woman of the Year awards dinner October 21 at the Indiana Roof Ballroom in Indianapolis.

Following are some of the accomplishments of the 10 finalists .

Kimberly A. Black
University of Georgia
Swimming and diving

  • Member of the Olympic gold-medal-winning 200-meter freestyle relay team.
  • Four-time NCAA all-American and member of Georgia's national championship team.
  • Winner of four gold medals and a silver medal at the World University Games.
  • Recipient of an NCAA Walter Byers Scholarship, the highest academic honor bestowed by the Association.
  • Awarded the Joy Williams Science Award as the top female science honors student at Georgia.
  • Southeastern Conference Boyd McWhorter Scholar-Athlete of the Year for 2001.
  • Inaugural winner of the Georgia Athletic Association Community Services Award, given to a student who dedicates time to volunteer work.
  • Recipient of 2001 Peach-of-an-Athlete Award, given by the Atlanta Boy Scouts of America for volunteer work.

Camille Cooper
Purdue University
Basketball

  • Member of the Division I Women's Basketball Championship team in 1999 and the runner-up team in 2001.
  • Starter for Purdue teams that were two-time Big Ten Conference champions and three-time Big Ten tournament champions.
  • Earned honorable mention all-American designation as a senior, as well as first-team all-Big Ten honors.
  • Political science major and member of Phi Beta Kappa.
  • Three-time academic all-Big Ten and a Verizon Academic All-American.
  • Coordinated the Tiffany Young Celebrity Basketball Game, a benefit for a youth center in her late teammate's honor.
  • Walked horses carrying disabled children, collected and served food for needy families and volunteered at basketball clinics and with the Girl Scouts.

Andrea Dutoit
University of Arizona
Indoor/outdoor track and field, cross country

  • 2001 Division I women's pole vault champion.
  • Named 2000 Raytheon Sportswoman of the Year.
  • Three-time all-American, competed in 2000 U.S. Olympic trials.
  • Selected as Arizona's most outstanding female student-athlete.
  • Graduated summa cum laude as the University of Arizona School of Health Professions Outstanding Graduating Senior.
  • A molecular and cellular biology major and recipient of Arizona Flinn Scholarship and Regents Scholarship.
  • Volunteered with Make-a-Wish Foundation, Tucson Women's Shelter, Adopt-a-Highway Program and the Boys & Girls Club.
  • Camp counselor for underprivileged children in Tucson.

Kameelah Taliah Elarms
University of California, Davis
Indoor/outdoor track and field

  • Twelve-time indoor and outdoor track and field all-American.
  • Six-time first-team all-conference selection.
  • Served on campus student-athlete advisory committee.
  • California Collegiate Athletic Conference Female Scholar-Athlete of the Year.
  • Member of the Verizon Academic All-District team and the Golden Key National Honor Society.
  • Winner of UC Davis Outstanding Leadership Award.
  • Served as coordinator of volunteers for Shriner's Hospital event, and volunteered as camp counselor and peer counselor.

Kristen English
Swarthmore College
Field hockey, basketball, lacrosse

  • Captained three different athletics teams for two years.
  • Division III Defender of the Year in lacrosse.
  • USILA all-American and all-conference selection.
  • Conference player of the year in field hockey, and a National Field Hockey Coaches Association all-American.
  • Recipient of Swarthmore's Gladys Irish Award, given to the senior woman who has best combined devotion to excellence in athletics performance with qualities of strong leadership.
  • A Rhodes Scholarship finalist, as well as a Verizon Academic All-American in field hockey and lacrosse.
  • Founder of the Kiddie Cafe, a lunch and activity program for preschoolers.
  • Founding director and coach at several summer camps and clinics for girls.

K. Elizabeth Flynt Asti
University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Swimming and diving

  • Five-time all-American diver and two-time NCAA champion.
  • Three-time conference silver medalist in platform diving and holder of platform-diving records at Tennessee.
  • Member of the USA Diving Senior National team who competed at the 2000 Olympic trials.
  • Verizon Academic All-American and all-Southeastern Conference pick.
  • Named the Lady Vol Academic Achiever for 2001 and also a member of the Golden Key National Honor Society.
  • Graduated in biochemistry and cellular and molecular biology with a nearly perfect grade-point average.
  • Volunteered at the Hope Pregnancy Resource left, participated in Cooks for Christ and led the Athletes in Action prayer team.

Sunny Gilbert

University of Missouri, Columbia
Cross country, indoor/outdoor track and field

  • 2001 Division I women's indoor champion in the distance medley relay.
  • Finished 11th in the 800-meter run at the outdoor championships in 2000 and was the Drake Relays Champion in the 800-meter relay.
  • NCAA postgraduate scholarship recipient.
  • Granted a Bright Flight scholarship, a Curator's scholarship and a Howard Hughes fellowship for research in biochemistry.
  • Big 12 Conference all-academic first-team selection for cross country and indoor and outdoor track and field.
  • Recipient of Natasha Kaiser-Brown Outstanding Female Athlete Award and also chosen for the U.S. Track Coaches Association academic all-American indoor and outdoor track and field teams.
  • Volunteered for Big Brothers, Big Sisters and as a camp counselor.

Angie Oxley
University of Nebraska, Lincoln
Volleyball

  • Starting outside hitter for the Division I women's championship team in 2000.
  • First- and second-team all-Big 12 selection.
  • Tri-captain for Nebraska's Big 12 Conference championship teams from 1998 to 2000.
  • Selected as the university's female student-athlete of the year.
  • Four-time academic all-Big 12 selection and two-time GTE Academic All-District pick.
  • Chancellor's Scholar and four-time winner of< the Highest Honors Distinction Medal.
  • Volunteered with Aid to the Blind, served as a speaker for the Husker Outreach program, as a counselor and coach for YMCA volleyball leagues and also participated in the E-mail Pals Program with the Lincoln public schools.

Claire Cunanan Reyes
Longwood College
Field hockey

 

  • Helped lead Longwood to a conference championship in 2000.
  • Named her team's most valuable player; also chosen for the Longwood field hockey coach's award.
  • Two-time National Field Hockey Coaches Association all-American.
  • All-NFHA academic pick and academic all-conference selection.
  • GTE Academic All-District selection and member of Alpha Lambda Delta, Delta Psi Kappa and Phi Kappa Phi.
  • Volunteered in the physical therapy department at local hospitals and clinics, and volunteered with preschool children.

Toby Wilmet
Washington College (Maryland)
Field hockey, softball

  • Two-sport team captain.
  • All-American field hockey goalie.
  • Named all-conference in both field hockey and softball.
  • Recipient of the Washington College Senior Athletics Award.
  • NCAA postgraduate scholarship recipient; graduated magna cum laude in art and humanities.
  • GTE Regional Academic All-American and three-time member of the National Field Hockey Coaches Association all-academic team.
  • Volunteered at a South African shelter, coordinated Student-Athlete Mentors at Washington and also volunteered with campus clean-up efforts

 

State Winners:

State winners selected for 2001 Woman of the Year award

The NCAA News, August 27, 2001

The NCAA has announced the Woman of the Year state winners for 2001. There were 51 chosen, one representing each state and the District of Columbia.

The NCAA Woman of the Year Award honors outstanding female student-athletes who have excelled in academics, athletics and community leadership.

The state winners this year represent 14 sports, with 29 student-athletes chosen from Division I, nine from Division II and 13 from Division III.

Each member institution was invited to submit a nominee. For the second year, schools were permitted to nominate two candidates if one of the candidates was an ethnic minority, and 28 institutions did so, up from 16 last year.

This year, 350 student-athletes were nominated, with 189 nominated from Division I, 41 from Division II and 120 from Division III.

A committee composed of representatives from member schools selected the state winners, and that same committee will select 10 finalists from among those winners. Selections are based on grade-point averages, athletics achievements and community service.

The 10 finalists will be announced in the September 10 issue of The NCAA News.

A national winner will be selected by the NCAA Committee on Women's Athletics from among the 10 finalists. That winner will be announced at the 2001 NCAA Woman of the Year dinner, presented by Rawlings, October 21 at the Indiana Roof Ballroom in Indianapolis. The theme for this year's event is "The stars of tomorrow."

Last year's national winner was Kristy Kowal, an all-American swimmer and Olympic silver medalist from the University of Georgia.

Other previous winners are: 1999 -- Jamila Demby, track and field, the University of California, Davis; 1998 -- Peggy Boutilier, lacrosse and field hockey, University of Virginia; 1997 -- the late Lisa Ann Coole, swimming and diving, University of Georgia; 1996 -- Billie Winsett-Fletcher, volleyball, University of Nebraska, Lincoln; 1995 -- Rebecca Lobo, basketball, University of Connecticut; 1994 -- Tanya Jones, track and field, University of Arizona; 1993 --Nnenna Lynch, track and cross country, Villanova University; 1992 -- Catherine Byrne, swimming and diving, University of Tennessee, Knoxville; and 1991 -- Mary Beth Riley, track and field, Canisius College.


 

State

State winner

Institution

Sport(s)

Alabama

Wendi Olivia Wilcox

Samford University

Basketball

Alaska

Melissa Mulloy

University of Alaska Fairbanks

Rifle

Arizona

Andrea Dutoit

University of Arizona

Indoor and Outdoor Track and Field

Arkansas

Amy Yoder Begley

University of Arkansas, Fayetteville

Cross Country, Indoor and Outdoor Track and Field

California

Kameelah Taliah Elarms

University of California, Davis

Indoor and Outdoor Track and Field

Colorado

Sarah Meyer

Adams State College

Cross Country, Indoor and Outdoor Track and Field

Connecticut

Amy Herz

University of Connecticut

Field Hockey

Delaware

Cindy Johnson

University of Delaware

Basketball

District of Columbia

Bowen Holden

Georgetown University

Lacrosse

Florida

Sarah Kureshi

University of Central Florida

Cross Country, Outdoor Track and Field

Georgia

Kimberly A. Black

University of Georgia

Swimming and Diving

Hawaii

Camille Kalama

University of Hawaii, Manoa

Soccer

Idaho

Annie Marie Kaus

Boise State University

Gymnastics

Illinois

Alison Grubbs

Lake Forest College

Basketball

Indiana

Camille Cooper

Purdue University

Basketball

Iowa

Candace Wilson

Central College (Iowa)

Volleyball, Basketball

Kansas

Emily Bloss

Emporia State University

Basketball, Outdoor Track and Field

Kentucky

Taryn Lewis

University of Kentucky

Rifle

Louisiana

Katherine Harris

Louisiana State University

Golf

Maine

Margaret Ficks

Bates College

Field Hockey, Softball

Maryland

Toby Wilmet

Washington College (Maryland)

Field Hockey, Softball

Massachusetts

Shannon Lynn Smith

Boston College

Cross Country, Indoor and Outdoor Track and Field

Michigan

Danielle Pease

Alma College

Softball

Minnesota

Jill Hocking

St. Mary's University of Minnesota

Softball

Mississippi

Jamie Sims

University of Southern Mississippi

Golf

Missouri

Sunny Gilbert

University of Missouri, Columbia

Cross Country, Indoor and Outdoor Track and Field

Montana

Natalie R. Hiller

University of Montana

Soccer

Nebraska

Angie Oxley

University of Nebraska, Lincoln

Volleyball

Nevada

Katie Barto

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Indoor and Outdoor Track and Field, Cross Country

New Hampshire

Erin Dromgoole

Dartmouth College

Cross Country, Indoor and Outdoor Track and Field

New Jersey

Tiffany Trockenbrod

The College of New Jersey

Field Hockey, Lacrosse

New Mexico

Jennifer Harrer

Eastern New Mexico University

Softball

New York

Bess Greenberg

State University of New York at Binghamton

Basketball

North Carolina

Mary Jayne Harrelson

Appalachian State University

Indoor and Outdoor Track and Field, Cross Country

North Dakota

Rebekah Leppard

University of North Dakota

Indoor Track and Field

Ohio

Tammy Venema

Wilmington College (Ohio)

Soccer

Oklahoma

Janel Hayes

University of Oklahoma

Indoor and Outdoor Track and Field

Oregon

Amber Larsen

Linfield College

Indoor and Outdoor Track and Field, Cross Country

Pennsylvania

Kristen English

Swarthmore College

Lacrosse, Field Hockey, Basketball

Rhode Island

Jessica Arrighi

Rhode Island College

Volleyball

South Carolina

C. Brooke Weisbrod

Coastal Carolina University

Basketball

South Dakota

Jenny Hill

Augustana College (South Dakota)

Softball

Tennessee

K. Elizabeth Flynt

University of Tennessee, Knoxville

Swimming and Diving

Texas

Kerry O'Bric

Baylor University

Outdoor Track and Field

Utah

Amy Ewert

University of Utah

Basketball

Vermont

Michelle Labbe

Middlebury College

Ice Hockey

Virginia

Claire Cunanan Reyes

Longwood College

Field Hockey

Washington

Anna Aoki

University of Washington

Outdoor Track and Field, Cross Country

West Virginia

Rebecca Kathryn Stallwood

West Virginia University

Cross Country, Indoor and Outdoor Track and Field

Wisconsin

Tina Basten

University of Wisconsin, La Crosse

Indoor and Outdoor Track and Field, Cross Country

Wyoming

Davina Strauss

University of Wyoming

Indoor and Outdoor Track and Field

 

2000 NCAA Woman of the Year

 

Georgia swimmer named NCAA Woman of the Year

Kowal ties honor to former winner, teammate

By Kay Hawes, The NCAA News, October 23, 2000

Kristy Kowal 2000 NCAA Woman of theYear

Kristy Kowal, a senior swimmer from the University of Georgia and a silver medalist in the Sydney Olympic Games, was named the 2000 NCAA Woman of the Year at the 10th annual NCAA Woman of the Year awards dinner October 15 in Indianapolis.

Kowal, who was chosen from among 10 finalists selected from more than 300 nominations, was recognized for her commitment to academics, athletics and community service.

"I did not expect this at all," said Kowal, who was noticeably surprised by her selection. "Swimming in front of 18,000 people in a Speedo is much easier than speaking in front of all of you.

"I'd like to thank the NCAA for this incredible honor, and I'd also like to thank the NCAA for its championships. There's nothing like striving to win an NCAA championship with your closest friends, your teammates."

Kowal accepted the honor on behalf of her former teammate, Lisa Ann Coole, who was the NCAA Woman of the Year in 1997. Coole died in a car accident in 1998. Coole's parents, Bill and Nancy Coole, represented their daughter at the dinner.

"Lisa was the captain my freshman year -- the hardest year," Kowal said. "She taught me the meaning of hard work and dedication. What I learned from her is what I like to pass on when I talk to kids.

"Lisa was one of those leaders who led by example. You would strive to be like her. She was just always there for us. She was a strong person with a good heart. She was killed (in a car accident) on her way to adopt a greyhound. Now, what does that tell you about her?"

Robin Roberts, ESPN and ABC sports commentator and anchor, shared the evening's master of ceremonies duties with Giselle Fernandez, a broadcast journalist who has been a regular contributor to CBS and NBC networks over the past decade.

Roberts, who hosts ABC's Wide World of Sports and serves as ESPN's play-by-play commentator for WNBA telecasts as well as frequently hosting ESPN's Sports Center, has emceed the NCAA Woman of the Year dinner since its inception in 1991.

In an evening themed, "A Decade of Excellence, a Future of Success," the NCAA also honored and cele brated the achievements of all 51 state nominees for Woman of the Year, giving special recognition to the 10 finalists.

Forty-four of the state nominees were present, as were nine of the last 10 Woman of the Year honorees. Cheryl L. Levick, athletics director at Santa Clara University and chair of the NCAA Committee on Women's Athletics, paid special tribute to the previous winners, since this was the 10th anniversary of the award.

A 30-minute ESPN broadcast on December 6 at 2 p.m. Eastern time will feature highlights from the awards dinner.

A winner in life

While Kristy Kowal might be best remembered as an Olympic medal winner in Sydney, her athletics success is only part of what makes her a role model for young people.

Kowal's community service -- which has included volunteering with the Safe Kids project, serving food at homeless shelters, collecting food and clothing for needy families and speaking to elementary children about the importance of academics -- was so impressive that the Atlanta Boy Scouts recognized her with the "Peach of an Athlete" award for her service.

Kowal, who majored in early childhood education, would like to become an elementary teacher. She spent time her senior year of high school assisting her former fifth-grade teacher, and that experience inspired her to pursue elementary education.

"I love working with kids," she said. "My mom was a teacher, and I've always thought that being a teacher was a great way to make a difference in kids' lives."

Kowal also spends a great deal of time addressing children in her community-service work.

"I tell them to work hard, have fun and smile a lot," she said. "Work to your highest potential and never give up. Good things come to those who wait."

Kowal has been a Georgia Presidential Scholar and was named to the dean's list numerous times. Last year, she was selected as a Ramsey Scholar, an award bestowed on the top-10 student-athletes at Georgia. Kowal is a GTE/CoSIDA Academic All-American second-team selection and a three-time College Swimming Coaches Association of America academic choice.

"Athletics inspires competitiveness, and I believe that competitiveness carries over into the classroom," Kowal said.

Kowal's athletics excellence includes a silver-medal winning performance in the 200-meter breaststroke in the Sydney Games, where she represented the United States. The winner of eight individual NCAA championships in swimming, Kowal holds one world record and eight American records and is a multiple-event all-American.

Kowal led Georgia to NCAA Division I team championships in 1999 and 2000, and her individual accomplishments include 24 all-American performances. She was chosen as NCAA Swimmer of the Year for 1999 by the CSCAA, and the group picked her again as co-swimmer of the year in 2000, a year in which she also was picked as one of the United States Olympic Committee national female athletes of the month for all amateur sports.

A 13-time Southeastern Conference champion, Kowal became the first woman in conference history to take the conference title in the 100 and 200 breaststrokes four years in a row. Kowal's international success includes a world champion title in the 100 breaststroke, a performance in which she set an American record.

Jack Bauerla, the Georgia swim coach, was pleased to see Kowal honored.

"She deserves what she gets because she works hard for it," he said. "We're very proud for the University of Georgia to have had student-athletes like Kristy and Lisa (Ann Coole)."

Bauerla also noted that Kowal has overcome disappointments (missing qualifying for the 1996 Olympic Games by seven-hundredths of a second and missing qualifying for the 200 breaststroke this year by only .01.)

"With each disappointment, she only came back stronger. We're very proud of her."

And Kowal feels like her persistence has been rewarded.

"In my mind, I've had the perfect year. Three individual championships, the team repeating its national championship, winning an Olympic medal and now winning this award. It's been a dream year."

Only one thing would make it even better -- the presence of Lisa Ann Coole, who had her life ended before she could reach her goal of becoming a veterinarian.

"I would give all of my awards," Kowal said, "just to have her back."

 

Finalists:

Carolin Bouchard, Boston College, Basketball

Bouchard is a two-time all-Big East Conference selection and owns school records for three-point field goals made and attempted in a career. The team captain helped the Eagles to a No. 17 finish in the ESPN/USA Today poll for 2000 and was selected to compete for Canada at the Olympics in Sydney.

Graduating summa cum laude, the accounting major was named Boston College's Outstanding Female Scholar-Athlete four times and became the first student-athlete in school history to earn the university's highest honor, the Edward H. Finnegan Award. The Rhodes Scholar candidate also earned an NCAA postgraduate scholarship.

Bouchard appeared on Big East public service announcements, promoting diversity and tolerance. She also volunteered for the BC Athletics Pen Pal Program, the Higher Education and Assisted Reading program and numerous projects through the BC Women's Basketball Community Service program.

Bouchard: "During my time at Boston College, I learned that goal-setting, effort and teamwork can lead to success not only in basketball but in every aspect of life. Participating in college basketball has given me much more than I could have imagined. I discovered things about myself that I never knew, learned skills that will be with me throughout life, and became a more complete person."

Amanda Colby, Bates College, Volleyball

A middle hitter for the Bates volleyball team, Colby was an all-conference selection in 1999 and 2000, as well as a second-team all-American last year, leading her team to a second-place finish in the New England Small College Athletic Conference.

A biochemistry major, Colby was a second-team GTE/CoSIDA Academic All-American in 2000, and she is a three-time academic all-conference pick as well. Her work has been published in the research journal "Chiralty," and she was selected as a Merck fellow, receiving a grant to conduct independent research and help organize a scientific lecture series.

Colby has served as a mentor for local elementary school children, and she's also participated in numerous "read-ins" at the school. Her volunteer positions have included being a teacher's assistant, tutoring chemistry students and coaching high-school tennis. She's also served as a resident coordinator at her dormitory and as a lab assistant.

Colby: "The ups and downs of my own competitive experience as a collegiate athlete and the feedback I've received from coaches and players has taught me powerful lessons. When preparing to present my senior thesis to a group of faculty, I found myself going through the same motions as I do before an athletics competition. My involvement in athletics has helped me harness my energy, maintain my focus, and hold myself to high standards in many aspects of my life. For this, I will always be grateful."

Jessica Dailey, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Track and field/cross country

A twelve-time all-American in track and cross country, Dailey has served as team captain in both sports. She's a five-time first-team all-Southeastern Conference pick and a five-time second-team selection for the perennial conference winning Razorbacks.

Dailey is a summa cum laude graduate in journalism and a two-time GTE/CoSIDA Academic All-American. She's spent six consecutive semesters on the Fulbright College Honor Roll and Arkansas honor roll, and she's a three-time SEC academic first-team selection. She's also competed in a campus-wide moot court competition.

Dailey's work in the community has included assisting elementary students as a Hispanic Literacy Volunteer; working with the Arkansas Athletes Outreach, a character-building program for schoolchildren; and participating in an initiative with local libraries called "Let's read with the Lady 'Backs." Dailey also has assisted the St. Thomas Aquinas parish with youth activities and served underprivileged children in the Razorbacks for Christmas program.

Dailey: "The discipline I've learned through sports has taught me about balancing the competing demands of daily life. Perhaps someday my achievements and the way I went about reaching them can be the inspiration for a young girl to make the right choices and pursue life with that same balance that has made me a better person."

Jayne Even, North Dakota State University, Basketball

Even was honored as the Division II Women's Basketball Player of the Year and the winner of the Division II Honda Broderick Cup, signifying her as Division II's top female student-athlete. Even was the North Central Conference's scoring leader and player of the year and helped North Dakota State to a national runner-up finish in 2000.

The mass communications major was named to the GTE/CoSIDA College Division Academic All-American second team for 2000, and she also earned an NCAA postgraduate scholarship.

Even was the student-athlete spokesperson for the United Blood Services and also volunteered as a Bison Buddies coach, a Big Sister and helped with sandbagging efforts during the 1997 flood. Even was a reading mentor in the Fargo schools and organized a bike race for the St. Paul's Newman Center.

Even: "A letter addressed to me arrived one afternoon at the Bison Sports Arena. A single mother who regularly attended our games with her son, Jacob, authored the letter. She wrote from her soul and intensely shared the impact I made on Jacob by simply taking time to talk and be with him after our games. I was shocked and humbled by her kind words, and I realized the impression I made. ... Through participation in basketball, volunteer activities and academics, I was able to continually improve and display the principles of leadership, responsibility, teamwork and dedication. By exhibiting these qualities, I became a positive role model for children like Jacob."

Alia Fischer, Washington University (Missouri), Basketball

A three-time Women's Basketball Coaches Association Division III Player of the Year, Fischer helped Washington to three consecutive national titles and a 68-game winning streak. The Honda Broderick Award, given to the division's top female student-athlete, and the Lucy Lopata Award, given to the top female athlete at Washington, are just two of the honors bestowed to the school's all-time leader in scoring, rebounds, blocked shots and field-goal percentage.

Fischer graduated with majors in French and marketing, earning an NCAA postgraduate scholarship. She was honored as the GTE/CoSIDA Academic All-American of the Year for 2000 and was a first-team Academic All-American team three other times during her career.

Besides volunteering for Mentor St. Louis and a community clean-up program called "Into the Streets," Fischer was a member of the school's Thurtene Honorary. The group is composed of the top 13 juniors at the university -- based on leadership, char-
acter and community service -- and the group organizes the largest and oldest student-run carnival in the country.

Fischer: "As a basketball player at Washington University, I experienced numerous team and individual accomplishments; however, the impact of athletics on my life cannot be measured in games won, points scored or records broken. Athletics provided me with a family away from home and relationships and experiences that I will cherish forever. Basketball gave me the opportunity to reach out to others and embrace the vibrancy of the campus, and it taught me the true meaning of balance."

Emily Haley, University of St. Thomas (Minnesota), Track and field/cross country

A team captain in track and cross country, Haley helped lead the Tommies to a first-place finish in the 400 relay in 1997. Haley, who has run on four conference championship relay teams, is a 14-time all-conference top-three finisher. She also participated on the 1997 team that finished second in the NCAA cross country championships, as well as on the 1,600 relay team at the 1998 NCAA championships.

Haley, who has nearly perfect marks, graduated summa cum laude with a degree in history and also is a premedicine major. Haley is a national dean's list honoree, an all-American Scholar and a 2000 GTE/CoSIDA Academic All-District selection.

Haley traveled throughout the world several summers as part of a youth mission with Royal Servants International, including a stint in a Chinese orphanage. She also has volunteered with autistic children, collected books for the Books for Africa project, and even performed at charity fund-raisers as a unicycling clown. She's served as a youth leader on a mission to Mexico, and is active with the Fellowship of Christian Athletes.

Haley: "I am a cancer survivor, and I have learned to make the most of life and to thank God for His many blessings. When I was in the process of cancer treatment, running became both a physical and emotional outlet for me. Following my entrance into remission, my involvement in collegiate athletics enhanced my ability to feel healthy and alive once again. Seeking excellence fosters character, and it is my hope that character is a trait by which I am known."

Anna Hallbergson, Barry University, Tennis

An all-American doubles player in 1998 and an all-conference pick in 1999, this team captain also found success in singles, where she was all-conference both years. A leader on and off the court, Hallbergson was selected as Barry's Most Outstanding Senior in women's tennis this year, when she led Barry to a berth in the NCAA championship.

A summa cum laude graduate in biology and premedicine, Hallbergson earned perfect marks throughout her collegiate career. Hallbergson is the female recipient of the NCAA Walter Byers Postgraduate Scholarship, the Association's highest academic honor, and she has been chosen both the Scholar-Athlete of the Year and the Outstanding Biology Major at Barry for the last two years. A three-time winner of the National Collegiate Natural Sciences Award and a two-time GTE/CoSIDA Academic All-American, Hallbergson also is a published researcher.

She dedicates four hours per week to the Big Brothers/Big Sisters mentor program, and she also is a volunteer tutor and a biology mentor on campus. A Barry University Ambassador, Hallbergson also has volunteered for Habitat for Humanity and the Jackson Memorial Hospital adopt-a-floor program.

Hallbergson: "Having set my goal to become a physician several years ago, I came to Barry not only to perform on the tennis court, but also to excel in the classroom, as a campus leader and as a member of the community. ... As an undergraduate premedical student-athlete, I have developed as a team player, a leader and as an independent critical thinker. My experience from involvement in academic classes, research, campus activities and athletics will serve me not only in medical school but also as a doctor and researcher."

Kristy Kowal, University of Georgia, Swimming and diving

The winner of eight individual NCAA championships in swimming, Kristy Kowal is the holder of one world record and eight American records. A member of the 2000 U.S. Olympic team and a multiple-event all-American, Kowal led the Bulldogs to NCAA team championships in 1999 and 2000. Kowal has been a Southeastern Conference champion 13 times, and last season she became the first woman in conference history to win the 100 and 200 breaststrokes for four consecutive years.

Kowal, who majored in early childhood education, would like to become a teacher. She has been a Georgia Presidential Scholar and named to the dean's list numerous times. Last year, she was selected as a Ramsey Scholar, an award bestowed on the top-10 student-athletes at Georgia. Kowal is a second-team GTE/CoSIDA Academic All-American, and she was picked for the College Swim Coaches Association all-academic team in 1998, 1999 and 2000.

Kowal has received the "Peach of an Athlete" award from the Atlanta Boy Scouts for her community service efforts. She's served as a volunteer with the Safe Kids project -- helping ensure children are safe in their car seats -- and as a speaker at a 1999 Youth Education through Sports clinic. Kowal has served food at homeless shelters, collected food and clothing for needy families and spoken to elementary children about the importance of academics.

Kowal: "Swimming has taught me discipline to balance my swimming career around my academics. I strive to show the same competitiveness in the classroom as I do in the swimming pool because I know that when my swimming career is finished, my education will be priceless. ... One of the most important lessons I have learned through my success in swimming is the value of being a role model. I have worked in swim camps talking to children, and I see in their eyes that they are looking up to me and hanging on every word I speak. I realize the importance of setting an example to them, not only as an athlete but also as a student. In the future, I aspire to be an elementary school teacher. I know my children in the classroom will look up to me as a role model, and it is my duty to teach them that the value of an education never runs out."

Gabrielle Rose, Stanford University, Swimming and diving

A 22-time all-American, Rose is a three-time NCAA champion and team co-captain who helped lead the Cardinal to a 1998 national championship, second-place finishes in 1997 and 1999, and a third-place finish in 2000. Rose -- whose mother is from Brazil and whose father is from the United States-- swam for Brazil in the 1996 Olympics, but she is on the U.S. Olympic team for the Sydney Games.

Rose graduated from Stanford this June with a degree in American Studies, and she is a first-team Pacific-10 Conference academic selection.

Rose has served as a volunteer swim instructor for children, and she's also helped organize the Youth Olympics, an annual event at Stanford. She represented women's swimming on the Cardinal Council, a Stanford forum that discusses student-athlete concerns, and she also has spoken to children at middle schools, high schools and Stanford Swimming Camps about the value of academics and athletics.

Rose: "As co-captain, my vision was for the team to put our whole hearts and minds into training and believe in each other as champions. Though underdogs for the first time in years, we asked the team to commit fully to Stanford's winning tradition and to one another so we could become the closest team of our four-year Stanford swimming experience. ... I leave my collegiate career knowing that all the hard work and sacrifice, personally and as a team, paid off. In that final test, I found the depth of commitment and connection with my team and uncovered something far greater than myself. My vision for the team had become a reality."

Phylesha Whaley, University of Oklahoma, Basketball

Whaley, the 2000 Big 12 Conference Player of the Year, earned a number of athletics accolades in 2000 while helping Oklahoma to the conference championship and an NCAA tournament Sweet-16 finish. The team captain and four-time team most-valuable player is Oklahoma's all-time leading scorer and an all-American, as well as a third-round pick in the Women's National Basketball Association draft, where the forward became a member of the Minnesota Lynx.

A sociology major, she graduated in May and has been honored twice as an all-Big 12 academic team member. Whaley also has been selected four times as a Sooner Scholar and as a member of the Commissioner's Honor Roll.

Whaley has volunteered for Meals on Wheels, Sooner Big Sis, City Sights Tour, Special Olympics and the Children's Miracle Network. For many of those projects, she served as team leader. Whaley also was a member of the Oklahoma Student-Athlete Advisory Board, and she was selected as an OU Athletic Leader, the athletics director's leadership award.

Whaley: "Growing up in the small town of Slaton, Texas, in a single-parent home, I learned early on in life that pursuing a college education was important to me and my family. ... The use of time management became vital as I took an active role in the team's community-service projects. I became a leader and role model for the underclassmen. I learned how to balance all the demands, on and off the court, that a Division I athlete must face. Each was a challenge for me at first. With the help of the coaching staff, my determination and support from my family, I became an educated woman who learned she has something to offer others and who learned the value of giving back to whatever community I belong to. Oklahoma's athletics department's internal slogan is 'Building Champions for Life.' I am real proof that the saying is a reality at OU."

 

State Winners:

  • Alabama: Lexa Wyndham Evans, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Gymnastics
  • Alaska: Leisha Jenkins, University of Alaska Anchorage, Gymnastics
  • Arizona: Carolyn Adel, Arizona State University, Swimming and diving
  • Arkansas: Jessica Dailey, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Indoor and outdoor track and field/cross country
  • California: Gabrielle Rose, Stanford University, Swimming and diving
  • Colorado: Melissa Bouren, Adams State College, Indoor and outdoor track and field/cross country
  • Connecticut: Bethany Hart, University of Connecticut, Indoor and outdoor track and field
  • Delaware: Sarah Edwards, University of Delaware, Lacrosse
  • District of Columbia: Katrina de Boer, Georgetown University, Indoor and outdoor track and field
  • Florida: Anna Hallbergson, Barry University, Tennis
  • Georgia: Kristy Kowal, University of Georgia, Swimming and diving
  • Hawaii: Raylene Howard, University of Hawaii, Manoa, Basketball
  • Idaho: Gloria Butler, Boise State University, Outdoor track and field
  • Illinois: Mary Ellen Hill-Schupbach, Bradley University, Cross country/indoor and outdoor track and field
  • Indiana: Sally Northcroft, Ball State University, Field hockey,
  • Iowa: Shannon Perry-Wieland, University of Northern Iowa, Volleyball
  • Kansas: Dawn Cady-Sullivan, Kansas State University, Volleyball
  • Kentucky: Amanda McCracken, Centre College, Cross country/swimming and diving/indoor track and field
  • Louisiana: Lisette Lee, Louisiana State University, Golf/swimming and diving
  • Maine: Amanda Colby, Bates College, Volleyball,
  • Maryland: Gina Melissa Dean, Salisbury State University, Field hockey
  • Massachusetts: Carolin Bouchard, Boston College, Basketball
  • Michigan:Kacy Davidson, Albion College, Basketball and softball
  • Minnesota: Emily Haley, University of St. Thomas (Minnesota), Cross country/outdoor track and field
  • Mississippi: Courtney Blades, University of Southern Mississippi , Softball
  • Missouri: Alia Fischer, Washington University (Missouri), Basketball
  • Montana: Megan Marie Harrington, University of Montana, Basketball
  • Nebraska: Janet Dutton, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Indoor and outdoor track and field
  • Nevada: Jennifer Collins, University of Nevada, Skiing
  • New Hampshire: Kristin Anderson, Colby-Sawyer College, Volleyball
  • New Jersey: Susan Rea, Princeton University, Basketball/Soccer
  • New Mexico: Kate Dunn, New Mexico State University, Golf
  • New York: Ria Megnin, Hartwick College, Cross country/indoor and outdoor track and field
  • North Carolina: Cecilia Louise Shinn, East Carolina University, Basketball
  • North Dakota: Jayne Even, North Dakota State University, Basketball
  • Ohio: Aleashia Washington, College of Wooster, Basketball/softball/outdoor track and field
  • Oklahoma: Phylesha Whaley, University of Oklahoma, Basketball
  • Oregon: Tarrah Beyster, Oregon State University, Softball
  • Pennsylvania: Irini Hazatones, Millersville University of Pennsylvania, Field hockey
  • Rhode Island: Katherine Saul, Brown University, Rowing
  • South Carolina: Ginger Denison, Furman University, Indoor track and field
  • South Dakota: Tracy Cleveland, Northern State University, Indoor track and field
  • Tennessee: Jennifer Bulkeley, University of the South, Basketball
  • Texas: Jackie Bucher, Abilene Christian University, Basketball
  • Utah: Denise Jones, University of Utah, Gymnastics
  • Vermont: Amanda Peters, Middlebury College, Field hockey
  • Virginia: Casey Taylor, Christopher Newport University, Indoor and outdoor track and field
  • Washington: Heather Wallace, Seattle Pacific University, Cross country/indoor and outdoor track and field
  • West Virginia: Jennifer Zipf, West Virginia Wesleyan College, Volleyball
  • Wisconsin: Rebecca Uphoff, University of Wisconsin, Stevens Point , Swimming and diving
  • Wyoming: Melody Friehauf, University of Wyoming, Volleyball

1997 NCAA Woman of the Year

 

Coole named NCAA's Woman of the Year

The NCAA News, October 27, 1997

 

Lisa Ann Coole 1997 NCAA Woman of the Year

Lisa Ann Coole, a record-setting swimmer at the University of Georgia, was named 1997 NCAA Woman of the Year October 19.

Coole received the award at the seventh annual NCAA Woman of the Year awards dinner at the Westin Crown Center Hotel in Kansas City, Missouri.

"This is just amazing," Coole said. "This is nice closure to what has been a wonderful career. It recognizes what the college experience was all about -- academics, athletics and service.

"Everyone was so deserving and I feel for the committee because it had to make a very tough decision. All the nominees are winners."

Coole emerged from more than 400 nominees to win the award. A special selection committee chose 51 state winners, including the District of Columbia, and narrowed the field to 10 national finalists. The NCAA Committee on Women's Athletics selected the Woman of the Year from the 10 finalists.

The Woman of the Year award honors academic and athletics excellence as well as community service and leadership.

Coole graduated from Georgia with a 3.620 grade-point average while majoring in biology. She was a two-time NCAA champion and 26-time all-American during her four-year swimming career at Georgia. She also won gold, silver and bronze medals at the World University Games in 1995 and has been named to two national swim teams.

A native of Rockford, Illinois, Coole was an active volunteer throughout her college career. She was involved with the Athens-Clarke County mentor program and an Athens-area homeless shelter for three years and twice was a volunteer for National Student-Athlete Day.

 

Finalists:

1997 NCAA Woman of the Year Finalists

  • Shelly L. Bartlett, gymnastics, Nebraska: 1997 individual all-around champion in the Big Twelve Conference ... 1997 female student-athlete of the year at Nebraska ... Earned all-America honors in the bars, vault and all-around ... Majored in secondary education/social sciences ...Volunteered for D.A.R.E., People's Mission City, Malone Community Center, No Guns/Know Guns, Omaha Literacy Council and "School is Cool" Jam ... Received Chancellor's Leadership Scholarship and Herman Team GPA Award.
  • Sara Bloom, rowing, Bucknell: Winner of two Patriot League gold medals ... Team captain for two years ...Two-time US Rowing collegiate all-American ... Second-place finish in women's intermediate eights at the 1996 American Rowing Championships ... Majored in biology ... Volunteered as coach and academic tutor ... Member of Mortar Board and Omicron Delta Kappa national academic/leadership honor societies.
  • Virginia Bolenbaugh, gymnastics, Seattle Pacific: National champion at 1996 USA Gymnastics Collegiate Nationals ... Five time all-American ... Majored in religious studies and educational ministry ... Member of Seattle Pacific student-athlete advisory committee and Alpha Kappa Sigma honor society ... Volunteer for Athletes in Action and as companion for elderly ... 1997 USA Gymnastics national-championship team member.
  • Lisa Ann Coole, swimming, Georgia: Won the 100-meter butterfly at the 1996 NCAA Division I Women's Swimming and Diving Championships and was a member of the national-champion 200-meter freestyle relay team in 1995 ... Majored in biology ... Three-time all-American ... Glamour Magazine's Top-10 College Women in America ... Volunteer for Athens-area homeless shelter and Salvation Army ... Participated in 1995 World University Games.
  • Julie Anne Roe, basketball, Millikin: Majored in American studies ... Women's Basketball Coaches Association Kodak All-American ... Named most outstanding player in the College Conference of Illinois and Wisconsin two times ... President of Alpha Lambda Delta honorary fraternity and vice-president of Delta Delta Delta ... Member of provost's internal athletics review team ... Volunteer English teacher ... Named Millikin Scovill Scholar ... Member of NCAA Division III sectional all-tournament team.
  • Ann Sieckert, volleyball, Augustana (South Dakota): An emergency medical technician and student coach ... Majored in nursing/biology ... Listed in 1997 Who's Who in American Colleges and Universities ... Named most valuable player/player of the year in the North Central Conference in 1996 ... First-team all-American ... Volunteer for Habitat for Humanity.
  • Natasha W. Taylor, basketball, West Texas A&M: Named the Arthur Ashe Jr. Sports Scholar Female Athlete of the Year ... Member of the university's student-athlete advisory committee and Alpha Chi honor society ... Majored in kinesiology ... Named most valuable player in the Lone Star Conference ... Volunteer for Camp Fire Girls and Meals on Wheels ... GTE Academic All-America and Kodak All-American first team.
  • Stacey Williams, track, soccer and basketball, Wilmington (Ohio): Holder of the Wilmington record in the 400-meter relay ... Two-time recipient of the Presidential Award in basketball ... Participant in the Umbro Select Senior Bowl Game ... Named the Ohio Player of the Year in 1996 ... Majored in physical education ... Volunteer for Head Start ... Named to the National Soccer Coaches Association of America all-American team in Division III ... GTE Academic All-America.
  • Meredith P. Willard, gymnastics, Alabama: Helped Alabama win the National Collegiate Women's Gymnastics Championships team title in 1996 and also won the all-around championship ... Named the gymnast of the year in the Southeastern Conference in 1997 ... Runner-up in the national all-around competition in 1997 ... Named Amateur Athlete of the Year in 1997 by the Alabama Sports Writers Association ... Recipient of NCAA postgraduate scholarship ... Majored in marketing ... Volunteer for Salvation Army and Project Angel Tree ... First-team GTE Academic All-America ... Member of Alabama student-athlete advisory committee ... Four-time scholastic all-American.
  • Wendy L. Wolff, softball, Wisconsin-Parkside: Named to the 1997 NCAA all-tournament team ... Advocate for Surviving Sexual Assault ... Softball clinic instructor ... Player of the year in the Great Lakes Valley Conference ... Two-time first-team all-American ... Majored in English ... Volunteer for Homeward Bound ... Named to Great Lakes Valley Conference all-academic team.

 

State-Level Winners

1997 NCAA Woman of the Year Logo

  • Alabama: Meredith P. Willard, Gymnastics, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa
  • Alaska: Elena Tkacheva, Gymnastics, University of Alaska Anchorage
  • Arizona: Leah Marie O'Brien, Softball, University of Arizona
  • Arkansas: Megan Flowers, Cross country, track and field, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville
  • California: Kimberly S. Haskell, Soccer, University of California, Davis
  • Colorado: Narcisa Sehovic, Skiing, University of Denver
  • Connecticut: Cheryl Simmons, Field hockey, Sacred Heart University
  • Delaware: Carol J. Marquez, Tennis, Delaware State University
  • District of Columbia: Joyce Luncher, Swimming, Catholic University
  • Florida: Casey Jo Custer, Track and field, Florida State University
  • Georgia: Lisa Ann Coole, Swimming, University of Georgia
  • Hawaii: Angelica Ljungquist, Volleyball, University of Hawaii, Manoa
  • Idaho: Lynne Hyland, Volleyball, University of Idaho
  • Illinois: Julie Anne Roe, Basketball, Millikin University
  • Indiana: Jennifer Renola, Soccer, University of Notre Dame
  • Iowa: Jennifer Ann Peters, Cross country, track and field, Loras College
  • Kansas: Belinda Ann Hope, Track and field, Kansas State University
  • Kentucky: Christina R. Brown, Cross country, indoor and outdoor track, Western Kentucky University
  • Louisiana: Becky Ann Gibbs, Swimming, Louisiana State University
  • Maine: Kara Jean Patterson, Cross country, outdoor track, Colby College
  • Maryland: Rachel A. Barnes, Lacrosse, field hockey, College of Notre Dame
  • Massachusetts: Kirsten S. Paquette, Indoor and outdoor track, Williams College
  • Michigan: Betsy J. Haverkamp, Cross country, track and field, Calvin College
  • Minnesota: Rebekah R. Ormsby, Cross country, indoor and outdoor track, Augsburg College
  • Mississippi: Ta'Mika R. Roddy, Cross country, indoor and outdoor track, Jackson State University
  • Missouri: Kirsten Bernthal, Volleyball, Truman State University
  • Montana: Greta V. Koss, Basketball, University of Montana
  • Nebraska: Shelly L. Bartlett, Gymnastics, University of Nebraska, Lincoln
  • Nevada: Marianne Vallin, Tennis, University of Nevada, Las Vegas
  • New Hampshire: Lori Monroe, Tennis, track and field, Colby-Sawyer College
  • New Jersey: Lisa R. Giaconia, Cross country, track and field, St. Peter's College
  • New Mexico: Heather Lynn Turner, Basketball, Western New Mexico University
  • New York: Katherine B. Maynard, Volleyball, softball, State University College at Potsdam
  • North Carolina: Susan Stogner, Volleyball, basketball, Lenoir-Rhyne College
  • North Dakota: Kasey Morlock, Basketball, North Dakota State University
  • Ohio: Stacey Williams, Soccer, track and field, basketball, Wilmington College
  • Oklahoma: Jenny Bramer, Basketball, track and field, University of Oklahoma
  • Oregon: Jessica L. Trippet, Basketball, Portland State University
  • Pennsylvania: Sara A. Bloom, Rowing, Bucknell University
  • Rhode Island: Amy Schauble, Softball, Rhode Island College
  • South Carolina: Jessica Nora Nixon, Swimming, University of South Carolina, Columbia
  • South Dakota: Ann Sieckert, Volleyball, Augustana College
  • Tennessee: Tracy Margaret Bonner, Swimming and diving, University of Tennessee, Knoxville
  • Texas: Natasha W. Taylor, Basketball, West Texas A&M University
  • Utah: Christl Hager, Skiing, University of Utah
  • Vermont: Amy DiAdamo, Lacrosse, soccer, Middlebury College
  • Virginia: Erin Hamm, Soccer, Randolph-Macon College
  • Washington: Virginia Bolenbaugh, Gymnastics, Seattle Pacific University
  • West Virginia: Kristin Ann Quackenbush, Gymnastics, West Virginia University
  • Wisconsin: Wendy L. Wolff, Softball, University of Wisconsin, Parkside
  • Wyoming: Jesseca H. Cross, Basketball, track and field, University of Wyoming

His Goal, Reached

When Champion profiled Josh Brooks two years ago, he was the assistant athletics director for internal operations at the University of Georgia, coordinating travel for the Bulldogs football team. He has since become an athletics director.

2015 Today’s Top 10: Shannon Vreeland

The swimmer won Olympic gold when she was a college student and has gone on to earn her degree. Up next? Law school and, perhaps, another medal.

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