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NCAA awards 2016 research grants

Four research teams will receive a total of $100,000 through the NCAA Innovations in Research and Practice Grant Program, designed to enhance college athletes’ life skills, psychosocial well-being and mental health.

Mind Matters Challenge winners to present proposals

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2015 Woman of the Year finalist: Margo Geer

The Arizona swimmer reflects on the important lessons she learned in her time as a college athlete.

2010 NCAA Woman of the Year

 

Justine Schluntz is the 2010 NCAA Woman of the Year

2010 NCAA Woman of the Year, Justine Schluntz

Justine Schluntz, a former swimming student-athlete at the University of Arizona, past-NCAA champion and 2010 Rhodes Scholar, is the 2010 NCAA Woman of the Year.

Schluntz accepted the award – among the most prestigious the NCAA bestows – during the 20th annual NCAA Woman of the Year event Sunday, October 17, at the Indiana Convention Center. The award honors female student-athletes who have completed their eligibility, demonstrated academic and athletics excellence while demonstrating extraordinary community service and leadership.

Schluntz majored in mechanical engineering at Arizona and graduated summa cum laude.

“Studying engineering as a female generated many challenges, but by working through these, I learned to persevere in the face of adversity in any setting,” she said in her personal statement on her nomination form.

A committee of representatives from NCAA schools and conferences selected nine finalists from a pool of 30 selected honorees. Those individuals were identified from an initial pool of 131 conference and independent honorees representing all three NCAA divisions and multiple sports.

The NCAA Committee on Women’s Athletics selected Schluntz as the national winner.

A native of Albuquerque, Schluntz is the fourth student-athlete from the University of Arizona and seventh swimming student-athlete to be named NCAA Woman of the Year. She represents the Pac-10 Conference.

After suffering a season-ending injury her freshman year, Schluntz began to mentor younger athletes and get involved in community service. She volunteered for Big Brothers/Big Sisters for two years, taught swim lessons to children and volunteered with Casa de los Ninos, an organization that seeks to prevent child abuse and neglect by offering services that promote child safety and family stability, in which she spent time with children and helped distribute Christmas gifts.

Schluntz, a 2010 Rhodes Scholar, will study at Oxford University and specifically research the viability of harnessing tidal energy from the oceans to use as a renewable resource. She was a finalist for the NCAA Walter Byers Postgraduate Scholarship and the NCAA Postgraduate Scholarship. The University of Arizona presented Schluntz with the Robie Medal at commencement, which is given to a student who exhibits “promise for the future.”

Schluntz was an NCAA National Champion for the 200- and 400-meter medley relay two consecutive years and was named to the Pac-10 First Team All-Academic Swim Team for three consecutive years. A 16-time NCAA All-American, she helped Arizona win the 2008 Division I women’s team championship.

In addition to being named Athletics Academic Champion and Distinguished Scholar, she was named the Athletics Valedictorian at Arizona.

Last year’s NCAA Woman of the Year was Lacey Nymeyer, also a former swimming student-athlete and teammate of Schluntz at Arizona.

 

Nine finalists are trying to succeed 2009 honoree Lacey Nymeyer as the NCAA Woman of the Year.

September 30, 2010

The NCAA has selected nine finalists for the 2010 Woman of the Year award.

The Woman of the Year award honors female student-athletes who have distinguished themselves throughout their collegiate career in the areas of academic achievement, athletics excellence, community service and leadership.

A committee of representatives from NCAA schools and conferences selected the top nine finalists from a pool of 30 honorees. Those individuals were identified from an initial pool of 452 conference and independent honorees representing all three NCAA divisions and multiple sports.

The NCAA Committee on Women's Athletics will select the national winner. The recipient of the 20th annual award will be announced during the 2010 NCAA Woman of the Year awards event, to be held Oct. 17 in the Indiana Convention Center's 500 Ballroom. 

Woman of the Year finalists include:

Division I

 

Lisa Koll, Iowa State University

Conference: Big 12 Conference
Major: Biology
Sports: Cross Country, Indoor and Outdoor Track and Field
Excerpt from personal statement: “I have learned there is no substitute for passion or teamwork and that being a part of something greater than one’s self is unsurpassed in its ability to generate connections between people.”
Koll, a cross country and indoor and outdoor track and field student-athlete, was the first woman to win four straight Big 12 Conference titles in the same event (10,000 from 2007-2010). Koll is the all-time women's collegiate record holder in the 10,000 meters (31:18:07), and the fifth person to win the national title in both the 5,000 and 10,000 meters, the same year, a record that hadn't been touched since 1998.
Koll graduated summa cum laude with a bachelor's degree in biology. While a student at Iowa State, she was ranked in the highest two percent in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences during her sophomore, junior and senior years.
A seven-time Big 12 First-Team Academic All-Conference recipient, Koll was named the Women's Division I Outdoor Track Scholar-Athlete of the Year in 2008. She served three years as team captain and regularly participates in motivational and outreach presentations for youth.

Brittany Rogers, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa 
Conference: Southeastern Conference
Major: Elementary Education
Sport: Softball
Excerpt from personal statement: “It would be inaccurate to claim I am the person I am today purely by my own exertion, for I am simply a piece of the puzzle, a representation of the incredible mentors I encountered in my lifetime.”
A four-time all-SEC First Team member, Rogers was named the 2006 SEC Freshman of the Year and selected for the SEC All-Tournament Team. In addition, Rogers was selected to the SEC All-Defensive Team for two consecutive years and was a top- 25 finalist for the USA Softball Player of the Year. Her team made appearances in the 2008 and 2009 Women's College World Series and she was named to the 2009 Women's College World Series All-Tournament Team. She was also named a National Fastpitch Coaches Association First Team All-American in 2008.
Rogers' community service involvement includes three years of coordinating the Alabama softball team's Project Angel Tree, and the Halloween Extravaganza for local children. Rogers also remains active in the community by speaking to young softball players and youth at various elementary schools.
Rogers, a recipient of the Arthur Ashe Sports Scholar award, and an NCAA Postgraduate Scholarship, has appeared on the University of Alabama's President's List and Dean's List multiple times. An elementary education major, she was a member of the campus Student-Athlete Advisory Committee for three years and served as the organization's president for 2008-09.

Justine Schluntz, University of Arizona
Conference:
Pacific-10 Conference
Major: Mechanical Engineering
Sport: Swimming and Diving
Excerpt from personal statement: “Studying engineering as a female generated many challenges, but by working through these, I learned to persevere in the face of adversity in any setting.”
After suffering a season-ending injury her freshman year, Justine Schluntz began to mentor younger athletes and get involved in the community around her. Justine has volunteered for Big Brothers/Big Sisters for two years, taught swim lessons to children and volunteered with Casa de los Ninos, in which she spent time with children and helped distribute Christmas gifts.
Schluntz, a 2010 Rhodes Scholar, will research the viability of harnessing tidal energy from the oceans to use as a renewable resource at Oxford University. She was a finalist for the Walter Byers Postgraduate Scholarship and the NCAA Postgraduate Scholarship. The University of Arizona presented Schluntz with the Robie Medal at commencement, which is given to a student who exhibits “promise for the future.”
Schluntz was an NCAA National Champion for the 200- and 400-meter medley relay two consecutive years and was named to the Pac-10 First Team All-Academic Swim Team for three consecutive years. A 16-time NCAA all-American, she helped Arizona win the 2008 Division I women's team championship.
In addition to being named Athletics Academic Champion and Distinguished Scholar, she was named the Athletics Valedictorian at the University of Arizona and graduated summa cum laude.

Division II

Lyndsay McBride, University of Indianapolis
Conference:
Great Lakes Valley Conference
Major: Graphic Design
Sport: Golf
Excerpt from personal statement: “If you would have told me my freshman year that I would become a national champion and an All-American, start a non-profit organization or go to Africa, I would have laughed. I have learned how much you can accomplish just by taking all the little steps to get where you want to be, inch by inch.”
McBride is the co-founder of Inches International which is an effort to raise money for scholarships to support schools and hospitals in Liberia and Sierra Leone. The idea to create the nonprofit was conceived after McBride and a classmate traveled to Liberia to assist in the building of a school.
Chosen as the Freshman Art Student of the Year, McBride has used her artwork to raise $34,000 for the Elkhart Women's Care Center. McBride was selected to the GLVC Academic All-Conference Team, and to the University of Indianapolis dean's list her freshman, sophomore, junior and senior years.
McBride, a recipient of the H. Merrill Underwood Art Department Scholarship, was 2009 NCAA Division II women?s golf national champion and the 2010 GLVC Women's Golfer of the Year. She was a member of the campus Student-Athlete Advisory Committee, serving as the women?s golf student-athlete representative.

Mary Slinger, Concordia University, St. Paul 
Conference:
Northern Sun Intercollegiate League
Major: Biology
Sport: Volleyball
Excerpt from personal statement: “Trust humanity—I believe trust to be the most important transferrable quality that I gained via sports. I leave many aspects of my life up to faith and believe to be better because of it.”
Slinger owns the title for the most all-time digs in Concordia's history, finishing her career with 2,349 digs. A member of the Concordia volleyball team that was NCAA Division II champion in 2007, 2008 and 2009, Slinger was a 2009 American Volleyball Coaches Association First Team All-American and voted NSIL Libero of the Year three times.
She participated in two service trips – one to Guatemala and the other to Nicaragua. Slinger was a member of the Tetra Delta Science Club for four years during which she served stints as vice president and president.
A recipient of an NSIC Myles Brand All-Academic with Distinction Award, Slinger also received the Willis R. Kelly Scholar Athlete award which is provided to the NSIC top female student-athlete. A dean's list student, Slinger was a President's Scholarship recipient 2006-10 and a 2009 First Team Academic All-American.

Natalja Stanski, Grand Valley State University
Conference:
Great Lakes Intercollegiate Athletic Conference 
Major: Biomedical Science
Sport: Soccer
Excerpt from personal statement: “Throughout my four years in college, I have been privileged enough to enjoy numerous experiences that have greatly shaped the person I am today. As an athlete in particular, I learned a lot about my ability to persevere, as my struggles with injuries allowed me to test the limits of my fortitude.”
A 2009 NCAA Elite 88 Award recipient, Stanski was a Metropolitan Hospital Child Life volunteer, tutored other student-athletes in math and science at the Student Support Center, was a member of Athetes Who Care, and was named to the Grand Valley State dean's list all four years.
Stanski received the GLIAC Commissioner's Award in 2008 and 2009 and was the Becky Wilson Award Winner for Academic Excellence (soccer) in 2008 and 2009. She was named 2009 ESPN the Magazine Scholar Athlete of the Year (First Team Academic All-American). In addition, Stanski was named to the 2007, 2008 and 2009 GLIAC All-Academic Team.
A defender and team captain, Stanski was a member of Grand Valley State's 2009 NCAA Division II national championship team.

Division III

Hannah Baker, Wartburg College
Conference:
Iowa Intercollegiate Athletic Conference 
Major: Biology 
Sports: Indoor and Outdoor Track and Field
Excerpt from personal statement: “…I have had the privilege of working alongside individuals with varying backgrounds and beliefs. This opportunity has shown me the value of diversity and challenge of utilizing various leadership styles toward a common goal.”
A three-year member of the conference Student-Athlete Advisory Committee who served as president in 2009-10, Baker received an NCAA Student-Athlete Leadership Award for co-leading, designing and organizing Kids' Day 'n Knight Multi-Sport Clinic.
Chosen as the Class of 2010 graduation speaker at Wartburg, Baker was a three-year team captain, represented her school at the NCAA Regional Leadership Conference and received an NCAA Postgraduate Scholarship.
She was a four-time national champion in the 4x400 meters, claiming the 2007, 2008 and 2009 outdoor championships and 2009 indoor championship in that event. Baker was named to the CoSIDA/ESPN the Magazine Academic All-American First Team in 2009.

Melissa Mackley, Gustavus Adolphus College
Conference:
Minnesota Intercollegiate Athletic Conference 
Major: Biology
Sport: Ice Hockey
Excerpt from personal statement: “Becoming an active student leader has propelled me to discover my passions. I have developed a sense of creativity and innovation, skills that I have used to aid others in finding their passions.”
A Habitat for Humanity volunteer and four-year member of Tri-Beta Biological Honor Society, Mackley is a recipient of the NCAA Postgraduate Scholarship and made the Gustavus Adolphus dean's list every semester.
A member of Gustavus Adolphus' 2010 Division III women's ice hockey semifinals team (third-place game), Mackley was a two-time team captain, was named to the CoSIDA/ESPN the Magazine Academic All-America First Team, and is a four-time MIAC conference champion. She was named to the All-Conference First Team in 2008-09 and 2009-10, was selected to the MIAC All-Rookie Team in 2006-07, and was awarded MIAC Player of the Week honors twice in 2008-09 and once in 2009-10.
The Gustavus Adolphus Student-Athlete of the Month for January 2009 and February 2010, Mackley was named to the American Hockey Coaches Association All-America First Team in 2008-09 and 2009-10 and received her team's Most Valuable Player Award in 2008-09 and 2009-10.

Ruth Westby, Emory University 
Conference:
University Athletic Association
Major: Environmental Science/Political Science
Sport: Swimming and Diving
Excerpt from personal statement: “The opportunity for a balanced experience at Emory appealed to me. I worked unconditionally in the pool but actually spent most of my time in the library, and while my teammates became my family, I loved meeting people who were dedicated in other ways.”
A five-time NCAA champion in the 50-meter freestyle in 2008, 200- and 800-meter freestyle relays in 2009, and 200- and 400-meter freestyle relays in 2010, Westby was also named a seven-time all-American in 2010 and was the most decorated swimmer in school history with 27 All-American certificates out of 28 possible events.
Westby was named to the dean's list four times and was twice selected a team captain. She received an NCAA Postgraduate Scholarship and volunteered for the Special Olympics. She was also a 100 Senior honoree, awarded by the Emory Alumni Association for up to 100 students in the senior class for being excellent models of citizenship and leadership.
Among her other activities, she mentored incoming freshmen at Emory, participated in fund-raising for the Court-Appointed Special Advocate Association and Cystic Fibrosis, served on a committee for Relay for Life, took part in the Emory Ethics Department's Summer Servant Leadership program and studied community conservancies during a month-long trip to Africa.

 

2009 NCAA Woman of the Year

 

Arizona's Nymeyer named Woman of the Year

By Leilana McKindra, The NCAA News, October 19, 2009

Lacey Nymeyer - 2009 NCAA Woman of the Year

Former Arizona swimming standout and Olympic silver medalist Lacey Nymeyer has been chosen as the 2009 NCAA Woman of the Year.

Nymeyer accepted the award – among the NCAA’s most prestigious honors – during the 19th annual NCAA Woman of the Year event Sunday night in Indianapolis. The award honors female student-athletes who have completed their eligibility, demonstrated academic and athletics excellence, and engaged in community service and leadership opportunities.

In accepting the award, Nymeyer congratulated the other honorees and thanked her parents, coach and the university. She also thanked the NCAA for providing an opportunity to acknowledge women not only as athletes, but as people.

Nymeyer called the Woman of the Award a culmination of all she’s done and accomplished so far.

“This award is the accumulation of everything,” she said. “It’s not just athletics, academics or my community. It’s everything. It portrays me as a person. This is who I am and this is what I do. To be able to be spotlighted for the balanced lifestyle I’ve worked so hard to put together, I think that’s what makes it so grand. It spotlights me as a person. That’s why it’s so special.”

A committee of representatives from NCAA schools and conferences selected nine finalists – three form each division – from a pool of 30 honorees. Those individuals were identified from an initial pool of 132 conference and independent nominees from all three NCAA divisions and multiple sports. The NCAA Committee on Women’s Athletics chose Nymeyer as the national winner. 

Nymeyer, from Tucson, is the third Arizona student-athlete and sixth swimming student-athlete to be named NCAA Woman of the Year. She represents the Pacific-10 Conference.

Since graduating from Arizona, Nymeyer has continued to train and compete and is eyeing a second Olympic berth in 2012 in London. In the meantime, beyond substitute teaching and leading swimming clinics, Nymeyer spends much of her time with public speaking, particularly to youth groups. She said it keeps her motivated in the pool.

“When you’re in college you swim for a purpose, and for the pride and tradition of your school, but when you’re done with that and you’re only swimming for yourself, it’s hard to be motivated at times,” she said. “When I can go and talk to kids and try to inspire them to their dreams, it’s tenfold on me. It inspires me. I see their excitement and it excites me.”

After she retires from swimming, Nymeyer aspires to enter teaching full-time. Whenever that day comes, Nymeyer said she will rely on the powerful experience of having been an NCAA student-athlete.

“I can honestly say in the last five years – through hard times, through good times – I have no regrets about any of the decisions I’ve made: going to the University of Arizona, making sacrifices for my sport, dedicating myself to my studies,” she said.

“I feel like I have been offered so many opportunities by being a student-athlete that have really influenced the way I perceived the world and where I want my path to go in the future. Being a student-athlete, you see that there’s so much more to life out there and it gives you hope and excitement for the future.”

Nymeyer helped lead Arizona to the 2008 NCAA Division I women’s swimming and diving national championship and captured a silver medal in the 400-meter freestyle relay at the 2008 Olympic Games in Beijing. A two-time Pac-10 swimmer of the year and 26-time all-American, Nymeyer also owns individual NCAA national titles in the 100-yard freestyle and 200-yard freestyle.

The physical education major was a first-team all-Pac-10 pick and a four-time University of Arizona Academic Champion. Away from the pool, she visited Haven House for Women and Casa De Los Ninos House for Children as part of team service projects. In addition to teaching swimming lessons to 5- to 9-year-olds, Nymeyer spoke at middle schools and youth sports banquets.

 

Q&A with Lacey Nymeyer

Would you have picked yourself as the NCAA Woman of the Year?

No. After meeting the girls and spending yesterday and today with them, I was blown away by the type of character they have and what amazing women are in this country. By getting to know them, I was really humbled by how much they’ve accomplished. It’s just a great honor, and I think this award really does represent all women very well, and especially these women.

The Woman of the Year award is designed to elevate female student-athlete nationally. Does it achieves this goal?

For sure. I think as women, especially in today’s society, there are definitely some hard stereotypes, especially with female athletics. I love how this award really does spotlight women not just as athletes or not just as a pretty face, but there is substance behind us and there is a purpose that we have here. Being a woman, you serve a greater cause in the community and you can have just a phenomenal impact on people’s lives. I think this award definitely spotlights that.

What’s the best advice you would share with other current and aspiring female student-athletes?

My coach always talks about things you should put your energy into. There are two aspects he talks about that we are in complete control of at all times: our effort and our focus. It doesn’t matter if it’s your effort and focus toward school, it doesn’t matter if it’s your effort and focus toward athletics or what you’re doing in the community, that’s what you’re in control of at all times. Especially growing up, being a teenager, in today’s world there are so many times when you don’t feel in control, you feel like you’re being acted upon. But to realize that I was always in control of those two things – they are mine and no one could take those away. That was the best advice.

Who are your role models?

Obviously my parents. They were great supports to me and examples to me of how to live a life that is not just for the quick pleasures or instant gratification or satisfaction, but really working hard toward the bigger goal and having a long-term dream. Also, my coach, Frank Bush, for what he has done not only for the program at the University of Arizona, but in my life, and how he has really taken an extra effort to help develop me as a person and not just as a swimmer.

What’s the best part about being an NCAA student-athlete?

The best part of being an NCAA student-athlete is competing for your college. Especially in the sport of swimming, where it is so individual, the opportunity you can have to swim for a greater cause, a bigger purpose, and to share that joy with a team, is very special. Also being a student-athlete puts sports in perspective. So many times, sports gets this skewed portrayal of winning and losing and what your stats are. You can get lost in it. When you compete in college and you watch college athletics, you know that those athletes, yes, they care about athletics, but they are being held accountable in the classroom, too. They are being held to higher expectations than just the normal athletes. They have other goals and purposes and it’s a whole human transformation that can happen through those four years, not just athletically.

 

NCAA names Woman of the Year semifinalists

The NCAA News, August 20, 2009

The NCAA has selected the top 30 honorees for the 2009 NCAA Woman of the Year award that will be presented in October.

The NCAA Woman of the Year Award honors senior women student-athletes who have excelled in the areas of academic achievement, athletics, service and leadership.

A committee composed of representatives from NCAA member schools and conferences selected the top 30 honorees – 10 from each division – from a pool of 132 conference nominees, which included seven student-athletes from independent institutions, representing all three NCAA divisions and multiple sports.

The top 30 will be trimmed to nine finalists – three from each division – next month and the NCAA Committee on Women’s Athletics will select the national winner from that pool of finalists. The recipient of the 19th annual award will be announced during the 2009 NCAA Woman of the Year awards dinner on October 18 in Indianapolis.

The 2008 NCAA Woman of the Year was Tennessee women’s basketball standout Nkolika Anosike.

2009 NCAA Woman of the Year finalists:

Division 1
Conference Name Institution Sport(s)
ACC Amanda Blumenherst Duke Golf
Big East Jennifer Kleinhans Connecticut Field hockey
Big Ten Ladia Albertson-Junkans Minnesota Cross country, indoor and outdoor track and field
Big 12 Loren Groves Kansas State Indoor and outdoor track and field
Big 12 Yolanda Odenyo Oklahoma State Soccer
Conference USA Eleanor Waite Rice Cross country, indoor and outdoor track and field
Pac-10 Lacey Nymeyer Arizona Swimming
SEC Ashleigh Clare-Kearney LSU Gymnastics
Summit Laura Hermanson North Dakota State Soccer, cross country, indoor and outdoor track and field
West Coast   Julie Rubenstein Pepperdine Volleyball

 

Division II
Conference Name Institution Sport(s)
California Collegiate Jasimen Bailey   Cal State Stanislaus Indoor and outdoor track and field
California Collegiate Meghan  Haas Cal State San Bernardino Volleyball
GLIAC Kathleen Tafler Grand Valley State Soccer
Great Northwest Ashley Puga Northwest Nazarene Cross country, indoor and outdoor track and field
Heartland Kelsey Yeatts St. Edward’s Soccer
Independent Amie Boles Texas Woman's Gymnastics
Lone Star Emily Brister West Texas A&M Basketball
MIAA Venessa Lee Pittsburg State Cross country, indoor and outdoor track and field
Northeast-10 Kailey Egbert Saint Rose Soccer
South Atlantic Anna Atkinson Wingate Basketball

 

Division III
Conference Name Institution Sport(s)
Centennial Caitlin Mullarkey Swarthmore Basketball, soccer, indoor and outdoor track
IIAC Kelsey Steffens Wartburg Indoor and outdoor track, volleyball
Liberty League Emily Love Vassar Swimming
Midwest Tanesha Hughes Monmouth (Illinois) Basketball, volleyball, indoor and outdoor track
MIAC Katherine Theisen St. Thomas (Minnesota) Cross country, indoor and outdoor track
NESCAC Elise Tropiano Amherst Cross country, indoor and outdoor track
North Coast Tracy Menzel Kenyon Swimming
SCIAC Rebecca Willis Redlands Soccer
SUNYAC Julia Hopson Fredonia State Indoor and outdoor track
UAA Dani Huffman Emory Volleyball

 

NCAA announces Woman of the Year conference winners

The NCAA News, July 30, 2009

More than 100 NCAA student-athletes have earned Woman of the Year recognition from their conferences and will vie for the 2009 NCAA Woman of the Year award that will be presented this fall.

The NCAA Woman of the Year Award honors senior women student-athletes who have excelled in the areas of academic achievement, athletics, service and leadership.

The 132 conference nominees represent all three NCAA divisions and multiple sports. In addition, seven student-athletes from independent institutions also will be considered for the national award.

A committee composed of representatives from NCAA member schools and conferences will select the top 30 – 10 from each division – from the conference and independent nominees. From the top 30 honorees, nine finalists – three from each division – will be chosen. The NCAA Committee on Women’s Athletics will select the national winner from the pool of nine finalists and announce the recipient during the 2009 Woman of the Year dinner on October 18 in Indianapolis.

Tennessee women’s basketball standout Nkolika Anosike was the 2008 NCAA Woman of the Year.

 

2007 NCAA Woman of the Year Top 30
2007 NCAA Woman of the Year

 

Arizona's Myers picked as Woman of the Year

By Leilana McKindra
The NCAA News, November 5, 2007

Whitney Myers, 2007 NCAA Woman of the Year

Former University of Arizona swimmer Whitney Myers reacts to being named the 2007 NCAA Woman of the Year. Myers is the second recipient from Arizona and the fifth swimmer to earn the award. Trevor Brown Jr./NCAA Photos.

Former University of Arizona swimming standout Whitney Myers was named as the 2007 NCAA Woman of the Year at the annual dinner October 27 in Indianapolis.

She is the second NCAA Woman of the Year from Arizona and the fifth swimming student-athlete to earn the honor.

The NCAA Woman of the Year award recognizes female student-athletes who have completed their eligibility and demonstrated excellence in academic pursuits, athletics, community service and leadership. A committee composed of representatives from NCAA member schools and conferences selected the top 30 out of 128 conference and independent nominees, 10 from each division.

From the 30 honorees, nine finalists - three from each division - were chosen. The Committee on Women's Athletics selected Myers from the nine finalists.

In accepting the 17th annual honor, a surprised and emotional Myers praised each of the evening's honorees.

"I wish I could break off a piece of the award for each of these girls because they all deserve it," Myers said. "This award encompasses the whole person, not just your athletics achievements or academic achievements or how many hours you give back to the community. It's how well rounded you are. All of the women here tonight have done an awesome job at developing the whole person. The whole package - that's what you see here tonight."

The whole package also is what you get with Myers, who stressed that she has always viewed her roles as student and athlete as equally important. There were times when she had to miss class for a meet and days when she missed practice to study for a test, and Myers thanked her coaches and teachers who supported her efforts in the pool and in the classroom.

Myers also credited her parents and Becky Bell, a member of Arizona's athletics department staff. "I don't really have any athletics role models. Athletics has taught me a lot about having great character, but athletics ends and that's why I've turned to role models who succeed in their whole lives."

Myers, a science education major with an emphasis in biology/pre-pharmacy, could easily fit into her own definition of a role model. In addition to classes and student teaching in a high school biology class three days a week, Myers is eyeing a run at the 2008 Olympics. A five-event qualifier for the 2008 Olympic Trials in June, she plans to spend the spring semester training.

"The Olympics is the ultimate achievement. To compete for your country is such a huge honor, and because of that, you put pressure on yourself," Myers said. "I'm learning to embrace that challenge, not shy away from it."

Myers' message to young aspiring athletes is along those same lines. Do it all, she said.

"You'll be standing next to someone from another school, you'll race until blood comes out of your ears and it'll be a great competition. Then you'll turn around and say "How's your family," Myers said. "Another great part of sports is learning how to turn things on and off, knowing how to be a fierce competitor but also knowing how to be a humble winner or loser."

Myers clearly has learned how to balance that fierce competitor with the humble winner or loser. Though she isn't sure what led to her being selected as the Woman of the Year, she is certain that it could have been any one of the finalists.

"I'll take the title of NCAA Woman of the Year and carry it with pride, but I know anyone else could be in my place and I?d be just as happy for them."

Myers' academic prowess earned her first-team academic all-American and first-team Pacific-10 all-academic honors for four consecutive years. She twice earned the Mary Roby Academic Achievement Award and was the winner of the 2003 Arizona Distinguished Scholar Award.

A first-team all-American in seven swimming events and a top-three finisher at the NCAA Division I Women's Swimming and Diving Championships in eight events, she holds 14 school records and is a two-time NCAA record holder. A member of the U.S. Women's National Team for three years (2004, 2005, 2006), Myers finished third at the 2004 Olympic Trials and fourth at the 2005 and 2007 World Championships.

Myers was team captain, co-president of the student-athlete advisory board, pre-pharmacy club liaison, student-teacher club member, group leader in the sponsorship of a low-income family and founder and director of a local swim clinic. She worked closely with local Girl Scout troops, elementary schools and retirement communities, and represented her university through many speaking engagements. A volunteer at a pharmacy, Myers also visited the children's ward at the University Medical Center.

NCAA President Myles Brand attended the dinner and commended the honorees for their accomplishments.

"The overriding impression that I have of these young women tonight is their academic achievement, community selflessness and their potential to be leaders of tomorrow. It's clear in hearing their stories that they are concerned and devoted to improving the human condition," Brand said. "These young women have committed to being leaders for positive change. I'm gratified at their willingness to do good for others and I encourage them to embrace every opportunity they have to make a difference in our world."

National basketball analyst Debbie Antonelli and SportsCenter and ESPNews anchor Sage Steele emceed the NCAA Woman of the Year dinner, which will be rebroadcast December 7 on ESPN2 at 4:30 p.m. Eastern Time.

 

Woman of the Year finalists announced

Th NCAA News, September 24, 2007

The NCAA has chosen nine finalists for the 2007 NCAA Woman of the Year.

This year's finalists are: Shauneen Garrahan, Amherst College (cross country, track and field), New England Small College Athletic Conference; Felicia Guliford, University of Tennessee, Knoxville (cross country, track and field), Southeastern Conference; Ana Gutierrez, Seattle University (soccer), Great Northwest Athletic Conference; Jessica Javelet, University of Louisville (field hockey), Big East Conference; Whitney Myers, University of Arizona (swimming and diving), Pacific-10 Conference; Ashley Parker, Lincoln University (Pennsylvania) (track and field), Division III independents; Debbie Sharnak, Vassar College (tennis), Liberty League; Sarah Shearman, Truman State University (volleyball), Mid-America Intercollegiate Athletics Association; and Jamie Wolf, Clarion University of Pennsylvania (swimming and diving), Pennsylvania State Athletic Conference.

The honor recognizes outstanding female student-athletes who have excelled in athletics, academics, leadership and service.

The NCAA Committee on Women's Athletics will choose the 2007 NCAA Woman of the Year from among the nine finalists. The winner will be announced during the 17th annual awards dinner October 27 in Indianapolis. ESPN's Sage Steele and Debbie Antonelli will serve as emcees for the evening. Steele is the SportsCenter update anchor for two ESPN morning shows and Antonelli is a veteran women's basketball television analyst who also has been a radio analyst for the CBS/NCAA Network for the past nine Women's Final Fours.

While in Indianapolis, Woman of the Year honorees also will participate in a community-service project for Habitat for Humanity.

The 2006 Woman of the Year was Anne Bersagel, a former cross country and track and field student-athlete at Wake Forest.

Following are some of the accomplishments of this year's Woman of the Year finalists:

 

Shauneen Garrahan, Amherst College
New England Small College Athletic Conference
Cross country and indoor and outdoor track

Academic achievements: Graduated in May of 2007 and majored in psychology and political science. Three-time New England Small College Athletic Conference all-academic honoree, 2005-07. Recipient of the Amherst College Senior Student-Athlete Award given to an exemplary senior athlete based on academics, community involvement and athletics prowess, 2007. Intercollegiate Studies Institute Honors Fellow, 2007-08. Recipient of the Psi Upsilon Prize, awarded to a member of the graduating class considered pre-eminent in scholarship, leadership, athletics and character, 2007. Co-author of article published in The Indicator, Amherst's student journal of social and political thought, 2006.

Athletics achievements: 2008 Olympic Trials qualifier in the 3,000 meters and the steeplechase. Recipient of Amherst's Mossman Trophy, which is given to the senior student-athlete who has brought the greatest honor through athletics to their alma mater, 2007. Two-time captain of the cross country and track and field teams. NCAA Division III 10,000 meter, 5,000 meter national champion, 2007. Two-time NCAA national champion in the steeplechase, 2005 and 2007. Division III Outdoor Track and Field Championships Performer of the Meet, 2007. Thirteen-time track and field (six indoors and seven outdoors) and two-time cross country all-American. U.S. Track and Field and Cross Country Coaches of America New England Region Athlete of the Year, 2007.

Service and leadership: President of the Newman Club (a Catholic student organization). AmericaReads tutor. Lead and assistant religious education instructor. Co-chair of The Inklings (a philosophy of religion discussion group). Substitute elementary school teacher. Mead Art Museum attendant. Chair of the Amherst College Republicans. Volunteer with Amherst 3-D (a service organization for children and teens with mental and physical disabilities).

Excerpt from personal statement: For one thing, being a student-athlete has taught me the importance of confidence. Whether it is for an exam or a race, I have found that I perform my best when I approach challenges with a confident attitude, knowing that my hours of hard work are going to pay off as long as I put forth my best efforts.

 

Felicia Guliford, University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Southeastern Conference
Cross country and indoor and outdoor track and field

Academic achievements: Graduated in August of 2007 and double majored in biochemistry, cellular and molecular biology and Spanish. ESPN the Magazine first-team Academic All-District IV track and field/cross country team, 2007. ESPN the Magazine second-team Academic All-District IV track and field/cross country team, 2005. Women's Intercollegiate Cross Country Coaches Association Academic All-American, 2004. Southeastern Conference Freshman Academic Honor Roll, 2003. SEC Academic Honor Roll, 2003-06. Nine-time Dean's List honoree. Lady Vol Honor Roll, 2003-07.

Athletics achievements: Team captain and team peer mentor, 2006-07. First-team All-American in track and field, 2005. Member of Tennessee's first NCAA track and field team championship (indoor), 2005. Member of Southeastern Conference Indoor Track and Field championship team, 2005 and 2007. SEC champion in the indoor 3,000 meter and 5,000 meter, 2005. SEC champion in the outdoor 5,000 meter, 2005. Member of four NCAA South Region championships and three SEC team titles in cross country. First-team All-SEC in cross country, 2004 and 2005. NCAA All-South Region in cross country, 2002, 2004 and 2005. One of three Lady Vols all-time to appear in four NCAA Cross Country National Championships during her career.

Service and leadership: Volunteer at the Free Medical Clinic for Working Poor and Catholic Charities. Coordinated after-school and weekend activities for children in a low-income subdivision as part of Montgomery Village Children's Outreach. Organized and conducted day camps for students ages 5-18 on Native American reservations as part of WINGS Running and Fitness Camps. Lady Vol Community Service Award winner, track and field, 2007. SEC Good Works Team selection, 2006. Miss Tennessee recipient at UT Athletics' VOLSCARS Awards, recognizing her as the female UT student-athlete who best demonstrated the traits of service, leadership, academics and athletics, 2007. Brad Davis SEC Community Service Award, 2007.

Excerpt from personal statement: Community service, a huge part of our Lady Vol program, has enriched and benefited my life much more than I had ever thought it could. I know that the purpose of community service is to give to others, but every time I work with someone in need I feel like they have given so much more to me than I could give in return.

 

Ana Gutierrez, Seattle University
Great Northwest Athletic Conference
Soccer

Academic achievements: Graduated summa cum laude in June 2007; majored in sociology and Spanish and minored in cultural anthropology. CoSIDA academic all-District VIII, 2005 and 2006. Great Northwest Conference Female Scholar-Athlete of the Year, 2006-07. First team academic all-American, 2006. GNAC all-academic selection, 2004-06. President's List, 2004-06. Dean's List, 2006-07.

Athletics achievements: Team captain, 2004-07. Member of Seattle's GNAC championship teams, 2003 and 2006. First team all-GNAC, 2003-06. First team Far West Region selection, 2004-06. GNAC Freshman of the Year, 2003.

Service and leadership: Volunteer at El Centro de La Raza Community Center. Tutored elementary school children in after school literacy program. Tutored fifth graders on Muckleshoot Indian Reservation. Eucharistic minister and lector in the Campus Ministry. Study abroad in Puebla, Mexico, 2005.

Excerpt from personal statement: As a member of the women's soccer team and a student of an integrated community, I have been blessed with the opportunity to experience the integrity and strength of a bond created between a group of people and the differences that group can make. My experiences of laughter, tears, blood, sweat, the burden of loss and the incredible feeling of success both on and off the field are responsible for empowering me as a confident, passionate and dedicated woman.

 

Jessica Javelet, University of Louisville
Big East Conference
Field hockey

Academic achievements: Graduated in May 2007 with a 4.0 grade-point average and majored in marketing. Valedictorian of the School of Business, 2007. University of Louisville Outstanding Graduating Senior, 2007. NCAA Postgraduate Scholarship winner, 2007. NCAA Walter Byers Scholarship finalist, 2007. Big East/Aeropostale Female Scholar Athlete of the Year, 2007. University of Louisville Female Scholar Athlete of the Year, 2007. ESPN CoSIDA Academic all-American (women's at-large) first team. National Field Hockey Coaches Association Division I first team all-America selection, 2003-06. Most Valuable Seller in Student Marketing Association, 2007.

Athletics achievements: U.S. National Field Hockey Team, 2006-07. U.S. National U-21 Field Hockey Team, 2005. Honda Award finalist, 2005. Big East Offensive Player of the Year, 2006. Big East Co-offensive Player of the Year, 2005. Team vice captain, 2006-07. Member of Big East regular season co-championship team, 2006. Big East first team all-conference selection, 2005 and 2006. Holds school career records for goals (69), assists (38) and points (176); established single-season records for goals (30), assists (14) and points (74); and holds single-game records for goals (5) and points (12).

Service and leadership: Volunteer for the After School Community Center, Silent Metro Fantasy Football League (for the deaf) and deaf bowling. Kentucky Youth Field Hockey Association and International Field Hockey Club of Kentucky coach. High school girls' lacrosse coach. Graduation commencement speaker, 2007. WLCV campus radio, program director. Chi Alpha Sigma (athletics honor society), president, 2006-07.

Excerpt from personal statement: In collegiate sports, everybody has amazing skill, but what separates the great from the good is a degree of dedication and mental strength. I've learned that sacrifice and self-discipline aren't punishment, but a mindset of accepting nothing less than your true potential.

 

Whitney Myers, University of Arizona
Pacific-10 Conference
Swimming and diving

Academic achievements: Science education in biology/pre-pharmacy major. Four-time first team academic all-American, 2004-07. Four-time first team Pacific-10 Conference all-academic selection. Arizona Academic Champion Distinguished Scholar, award by the athletics department. Two-time University of Arizona Academic Champion. Dean's List.

Athletics achievements: Member of the U.S. National Women's Swimming and Diving Team, 2004-06. Finished third at 2004 Olympic Trials. Finished fourth at 2005 and 2007 FINA World Championships. USA Swimming Golden Goggles Award winner for Female Performance of the Year, 2006. 2008 Olympic Trials qualifier in five events. Honda Award finalist, 2006 and 2007. Gold medalist in the 200 meter individual medley and Female Swimmer of the Meet at the 2006 Pan Pacific Swimming Championships. Team captain, 2004-07. Three-time NCAA individual and two-time relay champion, 2006 and 2007. Pacific-10 individual and relay champion, 2006. Holds 14 school records.

Service and leadership: Co-president of the Student-Athlete Advisory Board, 2006-07. Vice co-chair of Pacific-10 Student-Athlete Advisory Committee. Founder and director of local swim clinic, 2004 and 2006. Speaker for local Girl Scouts troop. Volunteer reader at local elementary schools. Volunteered for Race for the Cure and Fiesta Bowl Youth Football Challenge. Visited the children's ward at a local hospital and a local home for underprivileged children.

Excerpt from personal statement: Participation in collegiate swimming has allowed me to continue to build self-esteem while teaching me to believe in my abilities and preparation when the competition is at its most fierce. While I have experienced more success than disappointments, I have learned to always try my best while striving for excellence, not perfection.

 

Ashley Parker, Lincoln University (Pennsylvania)
Division III Independents
Indoor and outdoor track and field

Academic achievements: Health science major. Expected graduation date December 2007. Lincoln University Dean's List honoree. National Dean's List selection. Who's Who Among Students at American Universities and Colleges for Academic Excellence and Leadership, 2007. Recipient of the women's indoor track and field award for the highest grade-point average. Philadelphia Inquirer Academic All-Area Women's Track and Field Athlete of the Year. ESPN the Magazine third team academic all-American. Three-time winner of the Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference Academic Excellence Award while attending Delaware State University between 2003-05.

Athletics achievements: Team captain, 2006-07. Member of NCAA Division III Indoor Track and Field national championship team, 4 x 400, 2006. Top-three finisher at the Division III Outdoor Track and Field Championships, 4 x 100 and 4 x 400, 2006. Six-time all-American. Earned second- and third-place finishes in 400-meter and 55-meter dashes at Eastern College Athletic Conference championships, 2007. Top-five finisher in the 100-meter and 200-meter dashes at the NCAA Division III Outdoor Track and Field Championships, 2007.

Service and leadership: Volunteered at the Atlantic Care Regional Medical Center. Member of the National Society for Negro Women. Big Sister, Little Sister program volunteer. Special Olympics instructor. High school assistant track coach. Summer enrichment program counselor. Organized intramural basketball tournaments. Recipient of Lincoln's Sportsmanship Award for women's indoor track and field. Teaching assistant and tutor in the health science department at Lincoln University. First female in Delaware State University history to attend the Senior Woman Administrators/Athletics Directors Conference, 2004-05.

Excerpt from personal statement: Despite the many trials and tribulations, tears and happiness, and wins and losses, there are five major qualities I have gained by being a student-athlete "character, patience, discipline, teamwork and time management".I have really benefited from my experience as a student-athlete and the experience has equipped me with the tools to be successful and will last a lifetime. *First NCAA Woman of the Year finalist from a Historically Black College or University.

 

Debbie Sharnak, Vassar College
Liberty League
Tennis

Academic achievements: Graduated with departmental honors in May of 2007 and majored in history and political science. NCAA Postgraduate Scholarship recipient, 2007. Truman Scholar national finalist, 2006. Presidential fellow for the Center of the Study of the Presidency, 2005-06. Three-time Intercollegiate Tennis Association Scholar-Athlete. Three-time Liberty League all-academic team selection. Seven Sisters Senior Scholar-Athlete Award recipient, 2007. New York State Women's Collegiate Athletic Association Scholar-Athlete Award winner, 2007. Edwin H. Sherman Family Prize winner for outstanding undergraduate paper in force and diplomacy at Temple University, 2007.

Athletics achievements: Two-time team captain. Two-time first team all-American. Liberty League player of the year, 2006. Liberty League rookie of the year, 2003. Played No. 1 singles and No. 1 doubles for seven of eight semesters on the tennis squad. Helped Vassar win four straight Liberty and NYSWCAA titles and four NCAA national championships tournament berths. Vassar College Outstanding Female Athlete of the Year, 2007. Three-time NCAA Division III championships singles qualifier.

Service and leadership: CARES (Counseling and Assistance in Response to Rape and Exploitive Sexual Activity) Counselor. Academic tutor for students ages 10-17. Farm hand on the Vassar organic farm. Taught at free youth tennis clinics. National Committee on American Foreign Policy, intern, 2007. Global Justice Center, intern, 2006-07. Office of Congressman Rush Holt (New Jersey), intern, 2004. Eyes on the International Criminal Court (journal), editor. Volunteer at a women's shelter.

Excerpt from personal statement: My time on and off the court has prepared me to challenge the limits of what others might believe can be accomplished, and to never give up on my goals, no matter what life throws my way.

 

Sarah Shearman, Truman State University
Mid-America Intercollegiate Athletics Association;
Volleyball

Academic achievements: Graduated in May 2006 and majored in psychology. ESPN the Magazine/CoSIDA first team academic all-American. Four-time all-Mid-America Intercollegiate Athletics Association all-academic selection. Three-time MIAA Commissioner's Honor Roll honoree. President's Honor List and Vice President's Honor Roll selection. Inducted into Kappa Delta Pi (future teachers honor society). Completed undergraduate degree in three years and used final year of eligibility to begin master's degree in education.

Athletics achievements: Two-time first team all-American. American Volleyball Coaches Association national freshman of the year. MIAA Freshman of the Year, 2003. Member of three regular season and four MIAA tournament championship teams. Member of two NCAA regional championship teams. Two-time NCAA Elite Eight all-tournament team selection. Member of the starting lineup of the 2004 NCAA Division II national championship match. MIAA Most Valuable Player, 2006. Three-time all-MIAA selection.

Service and leadership: Fellowship of Christian Athletes, 2003-06. Participated in service trip to Oklahoma to repair youth camp damaged by storms, 2004. Volunteer for an after-school reading program, 2005. Counselor for summer girls basketball/volleyball camp.

Excerpt from personal statement: My student-athlete career has provided priceless opportunities of growth that will be forever a part of who I am. Along with the glories of competing, there were difficulties that surfaced that challenged my character and my beliefs. I have learned that grace is the way, patience and understanding earn trust, respect is critical and self-control is a choice.

 

Jamie Wolf, Clarion University of Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania State Athletic Conference
Swimming and diving

Academic achievements: Graduated in May of 2007 and majored in molecular biology and biotechnology. Four-time academic all-American. Inducted into the Phi Kappa Phi National Honors Fraternity, 2006-07. Barry Goldwater Scholarship nominee, 2006. Clarion University Foundation Grant and Clarion University Wide Undergraduate Research Grant awardee, 2005. Commonwealth of Pennsylvania University Biologist Conference, third place, molecular biology poster presentation, 2006. Dean's List.

Athletics achievements: Team captain, 2006-07. First seven-time national champion in Division II diving. First four-time national champion in Division II three-meter diving. Eight-time all-American. Three-time NCAA Diver of the Year, 2004, 2005 and 2007. Two-time Clarion University Athlete of the Year, 2005 and 2006. Clarion record holder in the 10-dive 1-meter, 11-dive 3-meter and 6-dive 3-meter events. Pennsylvania State Athletic Conference record holder in the 10-dive 1-meter and 11-dive 3-meter events.

Service and leadership: Member of the Beta Beta Beta Biology Honors Fraternity and served as secretary. Member of the Student Honors Association and served as a member of the community service committee. Manager of an undergraduate research laboratory. Member of Heath Careers Club and served as secretary and president. Participated in canned food drive, Clarion Dance Marathon and Operation Clean Sweep. Taught swimming lessons.

Excerpt from personal statement: Many years of diving have proven to me that success is not measured by the number of "wins?" under your belt. Success, in my opinion, is simply defined as trying your best.

 

Award field narrowed to 30 female athletes

By Leilana McKindra
The NCAA News, August 27, 2007

The NCAA has announced the top 30 nominees for the 17th annual Woman of the Year Award.

The honor recognizes outstanding female student-athletes who have excelled in academics, athletics and community leadership, and have completed their collegiate athletics eligibility.

A committee composed of representatives from NCAA member schools and conferences chose the nominees — 10 from each NCAA division — from 128 conference and independent nominees. From the group of 30, the top nine finalists will be selected and announced in September. The NCAA Committee on Women’s Athletics will choose a national winner from among the top nine finalists. The 2007 Woman of the Year will be announced during the annual awards dinner October 27 in Indianapolis.

The 2006 Woman of the Year was Anne Bersagel, a former cross country and indoor and outdoor track and field standout from Wake Forest University.

1994 NCAA Woman of the Year

 

Arizona's Hughes selected NCAA Woman of the Year 

As published in The NCAA News, November 14, 1994

Tanya Hughes

Tanya Hughes, a four-time NCAA high-jump champion from the University of Arizona, was announced as the NCAA Woman of the Year, November 14 in Washington, D.C. Hughes was selected from among 10 national finalists who were chosen by the NCAA Special Advisory Committee on Women's Corporate Marketing. The award recognizes excellence in athletics, academics and community leadership. Hughes earned a 3.435 grade-point average (4.000 scale) in interdisciplinary studies at Arizona. She was a three-time Pacific-10 Conference high-jump champion; a member of 1992 U.S. Olympic Team and 1993 World University Games Team; 1992 NCAA Female Athlete of the Year in track and field; a GTE Academic All-American; and the top-ranked American high jumper in 1991 and 1992. She also is a member of the NCAA Student-Athlete Advisory Committee, a spokesperson for Arizona's NCAA CHOICES Alcohol Awareness Program, and a member of the University of Arizona Minority Advisory Committee. The 10 finalists for NCAA Woman of the Year were announced at the annual meeting of the National Association of Collegiate Women Athletic Administrators September 18 in San Diego.

 

Finalists:

The other finalists were Steph Bruening, University of North Dakota; Helen Crook, University of South Carolina, Columbia; Christa Gannon, University of California, Santa Barbara; Holly Humphrey, Ohio State University; Katharina Larsson, University of Tennessee, Knoxville; Shannon Small, Northwestern University; Tina Stec, University of Iowa; Amy Marie Sullivan, Washington University (Missouri); and Alliniece Taylor, Florida A&M University. Of the 10 finalists, three represented track and field, while volleyball had two candidates. Other sports represented were basketball, swimming, golf, field hockey and tennis. Villanova University track and cross country athlete Nnenna Lynch won the 1993 award while Mary Beth Riley, a track and cross country athlete from Canisius College, won the first award in 1991. Catherine Byrne, a swimmer from Tennessee, was honored in 1992.

 

State Winners:

  •  Alabama, Tanya Wigley, Volleyball/ basketball, Alabama-Huntsville
  •  Alaska, Julie McHenry, Basketball, Alaska Fairbanks
  •  Arizona, Tanya Hughes, Track, Arizona
  •  Arkansas, Kimberly Mount, Cross country/track, Arkansas
  •  California, Christa Gannon, Basketball, UC Santa Barbara
  •  Colorado, Dana Cash, Volleyball, Northern Colorado
  •  Connecticut, Rose Daley, Soccer, Hartford
  •  Delaware, Karen Manlove, Softball, Delaware
  •  District of Columbia, Nicole Branner, Gymnastics, George Washington
  •  Florida, Alliniece Taylor, Volleyball, Florida A&M
  •  Georgia, Janeen Jones, Track, Georgia Tech
  •  Hawaii, Patti Jayne Brun, Softball, Hawaii
  •  Idaho, Nancy Wicks, Volleyball, Idaho
  •  Illinois, Shannon Small, Field hockey, Northwestern
  •  Indiana, Lisa Hadorn, Volleyball, Ball State
  •  Iowa, Tina Stec, Track, Iowa
  •  Kansas, Rhonda Matzke, Basketball, Washburn
  •  Kentucky, Laura Boswell, Volleyball, Centre
  •  Louisiana, Michele Hyden, Softball/volleyball, Centenary
  •  Maine, Neile Joler, Soccer, St. Joseph's (Maine)
  •  Maryland, Nancy Lentz, Lacrosse, Johns Hopkins
  •  Massachusetts, H. Jane DeLima, Diving, Northeastern
  •  Michigan, Karen Blankespoor, Softball/volleyball, Calvin
  •  Minnesota, Laurie Nelson, Swimming, Minnesota
  •  Mississippi, Vanessa Harris, Basketball/ volleyball, Mississippi Valley
  •  Missouri, Amy Marie Sullivan, Volleyball, Washington (Missouri)
  •  Montana, Shelley Smathers, Cross country/track, Montano
  •  Nebraska, Tracy Nichols, Golf, Nebraska Wesleyan
  •  Nevada, Mary Alice Torgerson, Swimming, Nevada-Las Vegas
  •  New Hampshire, Kelly Jewett, Basketball, Franklin Pierce
  •  New Jersey, Erine Grove, Softball, Trenton State
  •  New Mexico, Susana Tous, Tennis, New Mexico State
  •  New York, Ann Marsh, Fencing, Columbia
  •  North Carolina, Stephanie Ferri, Basketball, Pfeiffer
  •  North Dakota, Steph Bruening, Cross country, North Dakota
  •  Ohio, Holly Humphrey, Swimming, Ohio State
  •  Oklahoma, Kay Gooch, Track, Oklahoma
  •  Oregon, Margo Evashevski, Golf/basketball, Oregon State
  •  Pennsylvania, Mary Allison Williams, Cross country/track, Pittsburgh
  •  Rhode Island, Tracy Carter, Track/soccer, Salve Regina
  •  South Carolina, Helen Crook, Tennis, South Carolina
  •  South Dakota, Heidi Morlock, Basketball, Augustana (South Dakota)
  •  Tennessee, Katharina Larsson, Golf, Tennessee
  •  Texas, Tammi Julch, Basketball Texas, Woman's University
  •  Utah, Amy Timmel, Softball, Utah
  •  Vermont, Kristin Daly, Cross country/ skiing, Middlebury
  •  Virginia, Angie Carrington Murphy, Lacrosse/soccer, Washington and Lee
  •  Washington, Karin Grelsson, Track,  Seattle Pacific
  •  West Virginia, Nicole Mazur, Softball, Bethany (West Viriginia)
  •  Wisconsin, Kristen Maskala, Basketball, Marquette
  •  Wyoming, Kiesa Fornstrom, Swimming, Wyoming 

Finalists named for 2014 NCAA Woman of the Year award

Nine student-athletes have been selected as finalists for the 2014 NCAA Woman of the Year award, which will be announced Oct. 19 during a ceremony in Indianapolis.

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