Sport Science Institute

Division I Men’s and Women’s Basketball Championships: Physician Status

The NCAA has released the following guidance documents related to the resocialization of college sports in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic:

  • “Core Principles of Resocialization of Collegiate Sport” (5/1/20)
  • “Resocialization of Collegiate Sport: Developing Standards for Practice and Competition” (7/14/20) 
  • “Resocialization of Collegiate Sport: Action Plan Considerations” (5/28/20) 

Each of the above publications was intended to supplement and update the prior publications to reflect most recent emerging data and information available at the time of release. The NCAA has also published  and continues to supplement an FAQ document that contains questions/answers pertaining to the publications.  As the resocialization publications have been updated, they have rendered certain of the FAQ content outdated. Those outdated portions of the FAQ have been removed from the published version and have been archived to this document solely for purposes of historical reference. This content is no longer consistent with the Association’s published position and should not be relied upon as guidance.

Questions can be directed to the NCAA Sport Science Institute at ssi@ncaa.org.

Tier 1

If a team physician is to be part of Tier 1, the physician must be named as part of the travel party of 34.  This means the individual will stay in the Tier 1 hotel and will be part of the controlled environment for the entire tournament. Even if fully vaccinated, the physician must confirm seven consecutive daily negative tests before departure for Indianapolis or San Antonio (one must be PCR) and will continue the same cadence of daily testing — including quarantine until one test on-site is confirmed negative if the physician travels with the original travel party. The physician also will maintain physical distancing and masking in accordance with Tier 1 guidance.

Physicians who are fully vaccinated may move in and out of Tier 1 under the following conditions:

  • They must notify the Command Center and turn in their credential before departing.
  • They remain part of their counted travel party of 34.
  • They continue daily COVID-19 testing while off-site and confirm negative test results.
  • They may re-enter Tier 1:
    • After notifying the Command Center that they are returning.
    • Following one negative test on-site.

If a physician needs to return to campus and the team would like a replacement team physician, the following conditions must be met:

  • The departing physician must notify the Command Center and return their credential.
  • The new team physician will replace the former team physician and, therefore, be part of the travel party of 34.
  • The new team physician must confirm travel plans with the Command Center and confirm seven consecutive daily negative tests before departure for Indianapolis or San Antonio (one must be PCR).
  • The new team physician may enter Tier 1 following one negative test on-site, at which time they will receive a credential.
  • The new team physician will continue the same cadence of daily testing and will maintain physical distancing and masking in accordance with Tier 1 guidance.

Non-Tier 1

If a team does not declare the physician part of the travel party of 34 but wishes the physician to be on-site for treatment, the following conditions apply:

  • The physician must notify the Command Center that they are arriving as a non-Tier 1 physician.
  • The physician must be fully vaccinated.
  • The physician may not enter the controlled environment, e.g., the bench, team hotel, team eating areas.
  • The physician will be seated with other Tier 4 individuals.
  • The physician may treat Tier 1 participants in designated treatment areas with full PPE.

Championships Safety Overview

The NCAA is committed to the health and safety of all student-athletes, staff and fans. To satisfy this commitment, the Association has collaborated with leading members of the medical and scientific community with expertise in public health and COVID-19 management to establish guidelines for a return to championships.

The return-to-championships guidelines include the following provisions:

  • All rounds of the winter championships and Division I fall championships will be held at predetermined sites.
  • All championships will require a level of testing for Tier 1 and 2 participants before arrival at the championship site.
  • All championships will use a COVID-19 controlled environment for Tier 1 participants.
  • Aside from athletes who are actively competing or training, all accredited individuals and fans must universally mask and physically distance on-site.  
  • COVID-19 testing will be conducted based on travel considerations and each sport’s transmission risk level, as established by resocialization recommendations.
  • All individuals are required to adhere to safety protocols from the time they leave their home destination until they depart the championship site. 
  • Space management protocols will be developed for each site/sport to help ensure physical distancing.
  • Specific venue capacity and local health directives will be key factors in whether fans and family members will be allowed to attend. Site occupancy (inclusive of those in Tiers 1 through 3 and fans) may be up to 25% capacity, as determined by local public health authorities.
  • The NCAA’s championship guidelines allow each sport to use the appropriate guidelines for its championship event based on guidance and direction from the NCAA COVID-19 Medical Advisory Group, along with local and state oversight at the site of the preliminary and final rounds of the championship.

Each championship will establish two roles specific to the health and safety of the event: a Team COVID-19 Health Officer selected by every participating team and a Championships Medical Team for every championship event.

  • Team COVID-19 Health Officer: This individual is designated by each team to oversee team communication and management of confirmed positive COVID-19 cases. The COVID-19 Health Officer should be a medical provider or school administrator and serves responsibilities similar to the athletics health care administrator. The officer will oversee self-health checks of all Tier 1 participants, assuring that such checks are performed daily. The officer will consult with the team medical personnel regarding any report of symptoms disclosed in a self-health check. The officer will also be the designated recipient of verbal communication from the championship command center of a confirmed positive COVID-19 test. Following such communication, the officer will speak with the affected individual and will coordinate isolation logistics with the command center, while also serving as a liaison with the school, family and other key stakeholders to assure proper medical coordination, lodging and return travel.
  • Championships Medical Team: Each championship will have a designated Championships Medical Team, consisting of two to four individuals. There will be every effort to assure that one team is assigned for the entire championship. The Championships Medical Team will be utilized for complex decision-making around COVID-19 issues, including but not limited to decisions regarding re-entry into a controlled environment, impact of positive cases on game play, and requests by teams regarding medical decision-making related to COVID-19.  The championships medical team has no authority for decision-making regarding confirmation of COVID-19 tests, but may offer an opinion, when requested by the governing sport committee, championship administrator, local public health authority, or NCAA Chief Medical Officer, regarding complexities of COVID-19-related issues. This group provides recommendations that will be delivered via the NCAA Chief Medical Officer to the final decision-making authorities, which include the local public health authority and/or the championship sport committee as appropriate.

Tiers for Division I Men’s and Women’s Basketball Championships

All individuals who are part of the Division I Men’s and Women’s Basketball Championships will be identified as Tier 1, 2, 3 or 4 personnel.

  • Tier 1 individuals are those with the highest exposure (e.g., team travel party and officials). Physical distancing and masking may be compromised, especially during practice and competition. They must remain in the COVID-19 controlled environment.
  • Tier 2 individuals may have proximity to courtside, with potential periodic interaction with Tier 1 and potential compromised physical distancing with other Tier 2 participants (e.g., basketball committee members, select NCAA staff, ambassadors, site control officials, national coordinator of officials, contact tracers and game operations personnel). They must be universally masked and make every effort to maintain physical distancing. Interaction with those in Tier 1 is by approval only, with the assurance of physical distancing and masking.
  • Tier 3 individuals have proximity to those in Tier 2, and potentially to those in Tier 1 (e.g., select NCAA and venue staff, game and practice operations personnel, travel staff, and security). Tier 3 should remain separate from Tier 2, with only limited, approved interaction. This group should always physically distance and universally mask.
  • Tier 4 is the lowest exposure tier, covering individuals not in proximity to Tiers 1-3 (e.g., cleaning staff, media, player guest, conference administrators, hotel runners and the general public). This group should always physically distance and universally mask.

Testing strategies for Division I Men’s and Women’s Basketball Championships

Tier 1 participants will be required to undergo and document seven consecutive negative daily COVID-19 tests before arrival into Indianapolis or San Antonio. One of these tests must be PCR. Tier 1 individuals will be administered daily tests upon arrival and during the tournament. All Tier 1 individuals will remain in quarantine until two consecutive tests on separate days are confirmed negative, at which time team practice may begin. A same-day protocol will be in place for potential false positive tests.

Tier 2 individuals must undergo and document a negative PCR test within two days of arrival in Indianapolis or San Antonio (or a negative antigen test within one day of arrival) and will undergo PCR testing daily thereafter. Tier 2 individuals will remain in quarantine and may not begin their work until the first test upon arrival is confirmed negative. Tier 2 individuals will not interact with Tier 1 participants unless absolutely necessary and under conditions in which all parties are masked and physically distanced.

Tier 3 individuals must undergo and document a negative PCR test within three days of arrival in Indianapolis or San Antonio and will undergo PCR testing twice weekly thereafter.

Tier 4 individuals are not subject to testing and must follow the recommendations of local public health officials.

For participants who are at least two weeks post-infection and within 90 days of the first known date of infection, COVID-19 testing and contact tracing will not be required. Masking and physical distancing will still be required for these participants. Refer to the men’s basketball and women’s basketball policies for more details. For participants who are fully vaccinated, testing protocols will remain in place but they will not be subject to quarantine restrictions per guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Tiers for all other championships

All individuals who are part of the remaining NCAA Championships will be identified as in Tier 1, 2 or 3.

  • Tier 1 individuals are those with the highest exposure (e.g., student-athletes, coaches, athletic trainers, physical therapists, medical staff, equipment staff and officials). Physical distancing and masking may be compromised during practice and competition.
  • Tier 2 individuals (e.g., administrators, security, event staff and league staff) are considered at moderate risk to exposure. They may be in proximity to those in Tier 1 but can always maintain physical distancing and masking. They may have limited interaction with Tier 1 individuals only upon approval and assurance that all parties will be physically distanced and masked.
  • Tier 3 individuals (e.g., housekeeping, catering, sanitation, transportation, media and broadcast workers) make up the lowest tier of risk to exposure. They will have no interaction with people in Tier 1 or Tier 2.

Testing strategies for all other championships

The testing schedule for Tier 1 individuals is outlined in the chart below. Tier 2 individuals must undergo and document a negative PCR test within two days of arrival, or a negative antigen test within one day of arrival, and undergo daily self-health checks. Further testing is based on symptoms. Tier 3 individuals must undergo daily self-health checks, with testing based on symptoms.

Health and Safety Details for all NCAA Championships

 

The following chart is intended as a resource for member schools to use in coordination with applicable government and related institutional policies and guidelines. Updated information will be added when it becomes available.

Last Updated March 12, 2021

Event

Location

Dates

Pre-event Testing

On-site Testing

Fans

Media Access

FALL CHAMPIONSHIPS IN SPRING

DI Men’s and Women’s Cross Country

Oklahoma State University Cross Country Course
Stillwater, Oklahoma

March 15

Negative antigen within one day of arrival, or negative PCR within two days of arrival.

Testing upon arrival and quarantine until confirmed negative, then testing every other day while participating on-site.

Participants will be allowed to invite limited guests to the championship. There will be no public ticket sales for the event.

Some local and national media may be allowed to attend, but all news conferences will be virtual.

DI Field Hockey

Karen Shelton Stadium
Chapel Hill, North Carolina

May 7-9

Negative antigen within one day of arrival, or negative PCR within two days of arrival.

Testing upon arrival and quarantine until confirmed negative, then testing every other day while participating on-site.

Two guests per travel party member. No other fans will be allowed.

Some media seating but not allowed on field or in press box. All news conferences will be conducted virtually.

DI Football Championship Subdivision

Toyota Stadium
Frisco, Texas

May 16 (tentative)

PCR: Within three days before

scheduled competition for that

week.

Antigen/rapid PCR: Same day as each competition.

25% of venue capacity.

TBD

DI Men’s and Women’s Soccer

WakeMed Soccer Park
Cary, North Carolina

May 13-17

Negative antigen within one day of arrival, or negative PCR within two days of arrival.

Testing upon arrival and quarantine until confirmed negative, then testing every other day while participating on-site.

TBD

TBD

DI Women’s Volleyball

CHI Health Center Omaha
Omaha, Nebraska

April 13-24

Three times during the week prior to arrival on nonconsecutive days, inclusive of a negative PCR test within two days of arrival.

Daily testing upon arrival. Quarantine until first two tests (on separate days) are confirmed negative.

A limited number of tickets will be allocated to each team for the single match in which they are participating.  These are the matches being played in the CHI Health Center Omaha Convention Center.  No general public ticket sales. From the regional finals through the national championship match, each team will be allocated 200 tickets. Limited tickets remain for the  regional finals, and may be purchased online at NCAA.com/tickets. The semifinals and finals have reached capacity. Media will be all virtual through first round, second round, and regional semifinals.  A limited number of onsite media can attend regional finals, national semifinals and finals. All press gatherings will be virtual.

National Collegiate Men’s Water Polo

University of Southern California
Los Angeles

March 20-21

Three times during the week prior to arrival on nonconsecutive days, inclusive of a negative PCR test within two days of arrival.

Daily testing upon arrival. Quarantine until first two tests (on separate days) are confirmed negative.

No fans will be in attendance.

A limited number of media can attend.

WINTER CHAMPIONSHIPS

DI Men’s Basketball

Indianapolis and surrounding region

March 18-April 5

Tested for seven consecutive days prior to travel, including one PCR test.

Daily testing upon arrival. Quarantine until first two tests (on separate days) are confirmed negative.

25% of venue capacity for most sites.

Limited on-site credentials issued; postgame interviews conducted virtually.

DI Women’s Basketball

San Antonio and surrounding region

March 21-April 4

Tested for seven consecutive days prior to travel, including one PCR test.

Daily testing upon arrival. Quarantine until first two tests (on separate days) are confirmed negative.

17% of venue capacity for most sites.

Limited on-site credentials issued; postgame interviews conducted virtually.

DII Men’s Basketball

Regional sites:

West Liberty — West Liberty, West Virginia

Northern State — Aberdeen, South Dakota

Saint Rose — Albany, New York

Southern Indiana/Evansville Sports Corp. ­— Evansville, Indiana

Valdosta State — Valdosta, Georgia

Lubbock Christian —Lubbock, Texas

Lincoln Memorial — Harrogate, Tennessee

Colorado School of Mines ­—Golden, Colorado

Finals site:

Evansville, Indiana

Regional dates: March 13-16

 

 

Finals site dates:

March 24-27

Three times during the week prior to arrival on nonconsecutive days, inclusive of a negative PCR test within two days of arrival.

Daily testing upon arrival. Quarantine until first two tests (on separate days) are confirmed negative.

A limited number of fans may attend the regionals, however the regionals in Golden, Colorado, and Albany, New York, will not have fans. Some fans can attend the finals site in Evansville, Indiana.

Credentialing will be by invitation only. Local television and radio will receive virtual credentials with access to the NCAA digital media hubs and virtual post-game press conferences.

DII Women’s Basketball

Regional sites:

Ohio Dominican/Greater Columbus Sports Commission — Columbus, Ohio

Central Missouri — Warrensburg, Missouri

Daemen — Buffalo, New York

Drury — Springfield, Missouri

North Georgia — Dahlonega, Georgia

West Texas A&M —Canyon, Texas

Carson-Newman —Jefferson City, Tennessee

Colorado Mesa ­— Grand Junction, Colorado

Finals site:

Columbus, Ohio

Regional site dates: March 13-15

 

Finals site dates:

March 23-26

Three times during the week prior to arrival on nonconsecutive days, inclusive of a negative PCR test within two days of arrival.

Daily testing upon arrival. Quarantine until first two tests (on separate days) are confirmed negative.

A limited number of fans will be allowed at all regional sites except for Daemen. Guest of the participants can attend, but there will not be public sales at the finals site in Columbus, Ohio.

Limited access for media and all press conferences will be virtual.

National Collegiate Bowling

AMF Pro Bowl Lanes
North Kansas City, Missouri

April 7-10

Negative antigen within one day of arrival, or negative PCR within two days of arrival.

Testing upon arrival and quarantine until confirmed negative, then testing every other day while participating on-site.

No spectators

No in-person media

National Collegiate Fencing

Multi-Sport Facility
University Park, Pennsylvania

March 25-28

Negative antigen within one day of arrival, or negative PCR within two days of arrival.

Testing upon arrival and quarantine until confirmed negative, then testing every other day while participating on-site.

No spectators

No in-person media

National Collegiate Men’s Gymnastics

Maturi Pavilion
Minneapolis

April 16-17

Negative antigen within one day of arrival, or negative PCR within two days of arrival.

Testing upon arrival and quarantine until confirmed negative, then testing every other day while participating on-site.

No public tickets will be sold, but student-athletes will be allowed to invite guests to attend.

Limited media will be allowed with no access to the competition floor. All interviews will be virtual

National Collegiate Women’s Gymnastics

Dickies Arena
Fort Worth, Texas

April 16-17

Negative antigen within one day of arrival, or negative PCR within two days of arrival.

Testing upon arrival and quarantine until confirmed negative, then testing every other day while participating on-site.

At the finals site in Fort Worth, Texas, up to 25% capacity will be allowed.

Limited media will be allowed with no access to the competition floor. All interviews will be virtual

DI Men’s Ice Hockey

PPG Paints Arena
Pittsburgh

April 8-10

Three times during the week prior to arrival on nonconsecutive days, inclusive of a negative PCR test within two days of arrival.

Daily testing upon arrival. Quarantine until first two tests (on separate days) are confirmed negative.

Up to 25% of seating capacity will be allowed.

Media attendance will be limited from year’s past and will be invitation only.

National Collegiate Women’s Ice Hockey

Erie Insurance Arena
Erie, Pennsylvania

March 15-21

Three times during the week prior to arrival on nonconsecutive days, inclusive of a negative PCR test within two days of arrival.

Daily testing upon arrival. Quarantine until first two tests (on separate days) are confirmed negative.

A limited number of family/friends of the participating teams can attend.

A limited number of media will be credentialed.

National Collegiate Rifle

Converse Hall
Columbus, Ohio

March 12-13

Negative antigen within one day of arrival, or negative PCR within two days of arrival.

Testing upon arrival and quarantine until confirmed negative, then testing every other day while participating on-site.

No spectators.

N/A

National Collegiate Skiing

Cannon Mountain and Jackson Nordic Center
Franconia, New Hampshire

March 10-13

Negative antigen within one day of arrival, or negative PCR within two days of arrival.

Testing upon arrival and quarantine until confirmed negative, then testing every other day while participating on-site.

No fans or guest are allowed.

No in-person media.

DI Men’s and Women’s Swimming and Diving

Greensboro Aquatic Center
Greensboro, North Carolina

Women: March 17-20

Men: March 24-27

Negative antigen within one day of arrival, or negative PCR within two days of arrival.

Testing upon arrival and quarantined until confirmed negative, then testing every other day while on-site.

No spectators.

No in-person media.

DII Men’s and Women’s Swimming and Diving

Birmingham CrossPlex
Birmingham, Alabama

March 17-20

Negative antigen within one day of arrival, or negative PCR within two days of arrival.

Testing upon arrival and quarantined until one confirmed negative, then testing every other day while on-site.

No spectators.

No in-person media

DI Men’s and Women’s Track and Field (indoor)

Randal Tyson Center
Fayetteville, Arkansas

March 11-13

Negative antigen within one day of arrival, or negative PCR within two days of arrival.

Testing upon arrival and quarantined until confirmed negative, then testing every other day while on-site.

No spectators.

N/A

DII Men’s and Women’s Track and Field (indoor)

Birmingham CrossPlex
Birmingham, Alabama

March 11-13

Negative antigen within one day of arrival, or negative PCR within two days of arrival.

Testing upon arrival and quarantined until confirmed negative, then testing every other day while on-site.

No spectators.

N/A

DI Wrestling

Enterprise Center
St. Louis

March 18-20

Three times during the week prior to arrival on nonconsecutive days, inclusive of a negative PCR test within two days of arrival.

Daily testing upon arrival. Quarantine until first two tests (on separate days) are confirmed negative.

Schools will be allotted a limited number of tickets based on the number of qualifying wrestlers. There will be no public ticket sales for the event.

Some local and national media may be allowed to attend, but all news conferences will be virtual.

DII Wrestling

Super Regional sites:

Mercyhurst — Erie, Pennsylvania

Emmanuel —Franklin Springs, Georgia

Tiffin — Tiffin, Ohio

Central Oklahoma —Edmond, Oklahoma

Northern State — Aberdeen, South Dakota

Colorado Mesa — Grand Junction, Colorado

Finals site:

St. Louis

Super Regionals: Feb. 27-28

Finals: March 12-13

Three times during the week prior to arrival on nonconsecutive days, inclusive of a negative PCR test within two days of arrival.

Daily testing upon arrival. Quarantine until first two tests (on separate days) are confirmed negative.

Limited spectators which will be based on the number of qualifiers from each team. No public tickets will be sold.

There will be limited media access.

SPRING CHAMPIONSHIPS

DI Baseball

TD Ameritrade Park
Omaha, Nebraska

June 19-30

Negative antigen within one day of arrival, or negative PCR within two days of arrival.

Testing upon arrival and quarantine until confirmed negative, then testing every other day while participating on-site.

TBD

TBD

DII Baseball

USA Baseball National Training Complex
Cary, North Carolina

June 5-12

Negative antigen within one day of arrival, or negative PCR within two days of arrival.

Testing upon arrival and quarantine until confirmed negative, then testing every other day while participating on-site.

TBD

TBD

DIII Baseball

Perfect Game Field at Veterans Memorial Stadium
Cedar Rapids, Iowa

June 3-9

Negative antigen within one day of arrival, or negative PCR within two days of arrival.

Testing upon arrival and quarantine until confirmed negative, then testing every other day while participating on-site.

TBD

TBD

National Collegiate Beach Volleyball

Gulf Beach Place
Gulf Shores, Alabama

May 7-9

Negative antigen within one day of arrival, or negative PCR within two days of arrival.

Testing upon arrival and quarantine until confirmed negative, then testing every other day while participating on-site.

TBD

TBD

DI Men’s and Women’s Golf

Grayhawk Golf Club
Scottsdale, Arizona

May 21-26
(Women)

May 28 - June 2
(Men)

Negative antigen within one day of arrival, or negative PCR within two days of arrival.

Testing upon arrival and quarantine until confirmed negative, then testing every other day while participating on-site.

TBD

TBD

DII Men’s Golf

PGA National Resort
Palm Beach Gardens, Florida

May 17 - 21

Negative antigen within one day of arrival, or negative PCR within two days of arrival.

Testing upon arrival and quarantine until confirmed negative, then testing every other day while participating on-site.

TBD

TBD

DII Women’s Golf

TPC Michigan
Dearborn, Michigan

May 11-15

Negative antigen within one day of arrival, or negative PCR within two days of arrival.

Testing upon arrival and quarantine until confirmed negative, then testing every other day while participating on-site.

TBD

TBD

DIII Men’s Golf

Oglebay Resort & Conference Center
Wheeling, West Virginia

May 11-14

Negative antigen within one day of arrival, or negative PCR within two days of arrival.

Testing upon arrival and quarantine until confirmed negative, then testing every other day while participating on-site.

TBD

TBD

DIII Women’s Golf

Forest Akers
Lansing, Michigan

May 11-14

Negative antigen within one day of arrival, or negative PCR within two days of arrival.

Testing upon arrival and quarantine until confirmed negative, then testing every other day while participating on-site.

TBD

TBD

DI Men’s Lacrosse

Pratt and Whitney Stadium at Rentschler Field
East Hartford, Connecticut

May 29-31

Negative antigen within one day of arrival, or negative PCR within two days of arrival.

Testing upon arrival and quarantine until confirmed negative, then testing every other day while participating on-site.

TBD

TBD

DI Women’s Lacrosse

Johnny Unitas Stadium
Towson, Maryland

May 28-30

Negative antigen within one day of arrival, or negative PCR within two days of arrival.

Testing upon arrival and quarantine until confirmed negative, then testing every other day while participating on-site.

TBD

TBD

DII and DIII Men’s Lacrosse

Pratt and Whitney Stadium at Rentschler Field
East Hartford, Connecticut

May 30

Negative antigen within one day of arrival, or negative PCR within two days of arrival.

Testing upon arrival and quarantine until confirmed negative, then testing every other day while participating on-site.

TBD

TBD

DII and DIII Women’s Lacrosse

Kerr Stadium
Salem, Virginia

May 21-23

Negative antigen within one day of arrival, or negative PCR within two days of arrival.

Testing upon arrival and quarantine until confirmed negative, then testing every other day while participating on-site.

TBD

TBD

DI, DII and DIII Rowing

Nathan Benderson Park
Bradenton, Florida

May 28-30

Negative antigen within one day of arrival, or negative PCR within two days of arrival.

Testing upon arrival and quarantine until confirmed negative, then testing every other day while participating on-site.

TBD

TBD

DI Softball

USA Softball Hall of Fame Stadium
Oklahoma City

June 3-9

Negative antigen within one day of arrival, or negative PCR within two days of arrival.

Testing upon arrival and quarantine until confirmed negative, then testing every other day while participating on-site.

TBD

TBD

DII Softball

The Regency Athletic Complex at MSU Denver
Denver

May 27-31

Negative antigen within one day of arrival, or negative PCR within two days of arrival.

Testing upon arrival and quarantine until confirmed negative, then testing every other day while participating on-site.

TBD

TBD

DIII Softball

Moyer Sports Complex
Salem, Virginia

May 27-June 1

Negative antigen within one day of arrival, or negative PCR within two days of arrival.

Testing upon arrival and quarantine until confirmed negative, then testing every other day while participating on-site.

TBD

TBD

DI Men’s and Women’s Tennis

USTA National Campus (Collegiate Center)
Orlando, Florida

May 20-29
 

Negative antigen within one day of arrival, or negative PCR within two days of arrival.

Testing upon arrival and quarantine until confirmed negative, then testing every other day while participating on-site.

TBD

TBD

DII Men’s and Women’s Tennis

Surprise Tennis & Racquet Complex
Surprise, Arizona

May 18-22
 

Negative antigen within one day of arrival, or negative PCR within two days of arrival.

Testing upon arrival and quarantine until confirmed negative, then testing every other day while participating on-site.

TBD

TBD

DIII Men’s and Women’s Tennis

Biszantz Family Tennis Center
Claremont, California

May 24-30
 

Negative antigen within one day of arrival, or negative PCR within two days of arrival.

Testing upon arrival and quarantine until confirmed negative, then testing every other day while participating on-site.

TBD

TBD

DI Men’s and Women’s Track and Field (outdoor)

Hayward Field
Eugene, Oregon

June 9-12
 

Negative antigen within one day of arrival, or negative PCR within two days of arrival.

Testing upon arrival and quarantine until confirmed negative, then testing every other day while participating on-site.

TBD

TBD

DII Men’s and Women’s Track and Field (outdoor)

Grand Valley State South Complex
Allendale, Michigan

May 27-29
 

Negative antigen within one day of arrival, or negative PCR within two days of arrival.

Testing upon arrival and quarantine until confirmed negative, then testing every other day while participating on-site.

TBD

TBD

DIII Men’s and Women’s Track and Field (outdoor)

Irwin Belk Track
Greensboro, North Carolina

May 27-29

Negative antigen within one day of arrival, or negative PCR within two days of arrival.

Testing upon arrival and quarantine until confirmed negative, then testing every other day while participating on-site.

TBD

TBD

National Collegiate Men’s Volleyball

Covelli Center
Columbus, Ohio

May 6-8

Three times weekly on nonconsecutive days (antigen or PCR, confirmed negative), with a negative PCR within two days of arrival.

Testing upon arrival and quarantine until two consecutive tests are confirmed negative, then daily testing while participating on-site.

TBD

TBD

DIII Men’s Volleyball

The Shults Center at Nazareth College
Rochester, New York

April 23-24

Three times weekly on nonconsecutive days (antigen or PCR, confirmed negative), with a negative PCR within two days of arrival.

Testing upon arrival and quarantine until two consecutive tests are confirmed negative, then daily testing while participating on-site.

Attendance will be capped at 500 fans per match. Competing teams will be provided 100 tickets per match. More may be provided if needed. The remaining tickets will be sold on a per-match basis.

Limited media can attend, but all press gatherings will be virtual.

National Collegiate Women’s Water Polo

Spieker Aquatics Center
Los Angeles

May 14-16

Three times weekly on nonconsecutive days (antigen or PCR, confirmed negative), with a negative PCR within two days of arrival.

Testing upon arrival and quarantine until two consecutive tests are confirmed negative, then daily testing while participating on-site.

TBD

TBD

Return-to-play considerations following a positive test during championships

Some athletes may test positive for COVID-19 just before or during championships and may have an opportunity to compete if they have completed mandatory isolation and recovered and the championship event is ongoing. For this scenario, the NCAA COVID-19 Medical Advisory Group agreed with the following considerations that were developed by the COVID-19 Playing and Practice Season Subcommittee of the Committee on Competitive Safeguards and Medical Aspects of Sports.

  • Return-to-play decisions are to occur in a manner consistent with the provisions of independent medical care legislation, which provides primary athletics health care providers with unchallengeable autonomous authority to determine medical management and return-to-play decisions related to student-athletes (Division I Constitution 3.2.4.19; Division II Constitution 3.3.4.19; Division III Constitution 3.2.4.21).
  • Consistent with previous feedback, the subcommittee agreed that established best practices related to transition periods apply to this scenario, given the time of inactivity and potential for infection impact.
  • No singular approach (e.g., X-day policy) is appropriate as a substitution for local medical judgement and decision-making. Specifically, there can be significant variability in the clinical impact of COVID-19 infection and the overall physiological readiness of student-athletes, and this variability must be individually assessed by primary athletic health care providers.
  • Following isolation and appropriate medical clearance (e.g., cardiopulmonary evaluation), physical activity should be appropriately calibrated for sport-specific intensity, frequency and duration. In particular, the subcommittee highlighted the need for a demonstrated progression of intensity in a noncompetition setting. 
    • For example, before competition a student-athlete should demonstrate the ability to successfully manage physiological stress comparable to that during competition.
  • In summary, the principles of transition periods with a focus on frequency, duration and intensity of activity continue to apply; further, the variability in the clinical impact of disease and the overall physiological readiness of student-athletes does not support a national standardized policy for return to play. Following isolation and appropriate medical clearance, affected athletes should be evaluated on a case-by-case basis, and in a sport-specific way, before return to competition.

Media requests

Media should submit inquiries on health and safety protocols using this form.

 

COVID-19 Testing Resources

NCAA has been informed the suppliers listed below may have testing materials available for member school’s testing needs during the regular season. Each supplier who has indicated availability is listed below, along with a document via the link introducing their company and providing details on testing supplies and how to contact them.

Members interested in contracting with any of the suppliers listed should use the contact information provided in the link. This list will be updated as suppliers make their availability known.

COVID-19 Updates - Vaccines and Emerging SARS-CoV-2 Variants

2021 brings a mixture of hope and concern regarding COVID-19. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently published key updates and considerations on vaccines and emerging virus variants. The NCAA Sport Science Institute provides this summary to facilitate membership access to this information. These materials are intended as a resource for member schools to use in coordination with applicable government and related institutional policies and guidelines and should not be used as a substitute for medical or legal advice. This content should be considered current as of the date of initial publication and does not reflect all relevant information related to these topics. Accordingly, schools are encouraged to consult the CDC website and U.S. Food and Drug Administration website for more details and relevant updates.

Vaccine

Currently, two vaccines have been authorized and recommended to prevent COVID-19 in the United States, and we hope that two additional vaccines will be available soon. Because of infrastructure challenges and vaccine dose availability, the vaccine rollout in our country will occur slowly. It is likely to take time for those wanting the vaccine to receive the recommended doses. The CDC and the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices have published recommendations that suggest allocating available COVID-19 vaccine in phases:

  • 1a: Health care personnel and long-term care facility residents.
  • 1b: Front-line essential workers and people age 75 years and older.
  • 1c: People ages 65 through 74 years, people ages 16 through 64 years with underlying medical conditions and other essential workers.

Note that phases 1a, 1b and 1c are expected to roll out through the spring, and these phases do not include the majority of student-athletes because they do not have specified underlying medical conditions. 

Many officials and other athletic stakeholders will meet the above criteria and receive the vaccine during the first three phases of the rollout. Still, the CDC website states that we won’t know how the vaccines impact immunity until more data is available, and while experts learn more about the protection that vaccines provide, it will be important for everyone to continue using all the tools available to help stop COVID-19 spread, including recommended use of masks, distancing and hand hygiene.

Accordingly, for all Tier 1 individuals who are vaccinated, the NCAA COVID-19 Medical Advisory Group continues to recommend no change in testing or risk mitigation considerations until we better understand COVID-19 transmission risk post-vaccination.

Emerging SARS-CoV-2 Variants

It is common for viruses to mutate, that is, to change their genetic material. The SARS-CoV-2 virus that causes COVID-19 acquires about one new mutation in its genome every two weeks. The CDC has confirmed identification of two recently emerged variant strains of SARS-CoV-2 that contain a series of mutations. Mutations become clinically relevant when they lead to a change in the viral protein’s function. The CDC website provides information about the potential consequences of these new mutations, which include:

  • Ability to spread more quickly in humans. 
  • Ability to cause either milder or more severe disease in humans.
  • Ability to evade detection by specific diagnostic tests.
  • Decreased susceptibility to therapeutic agents such as monoclonal antibodies.
  • Ability to evade vaccine-induced immunity.

Currently the two variants are being monitored closely. One variant has been described in the United Kingdom, and it has properties that allow the virus to spread more quickly in humans. A second variant has emerged in South Africa independent of the United Kingdom strain. While information about the characteristics of these variants is rapidly emerging, the CDC has not indicated at this time that either of these strains leads to more severe disease, evades detection by diagnostic tests, decreases susceptibility to therapeutic agents or evades vaccine-induced immunity.

The emergence of variant strains compels us to be even more vigilant regarding infection risk mitigation and testing. Although vaccines are now in sight, we must also be mindful of a more dangerous spread of COVID-19.

Guidance and Considerations for Men’s and Women’s Basketball Officiating

The NCAA has released the following guidance documents related to the resocialization of college sports in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic:

  • “Core Principles of Resocialization of Collegiate Sport” (5/1/20)
  • “Resocialization of Collegiate Sport: Developing Standards for Practice and Competition” (7/14/20) 
  • “Resocialization of Collegiate Sport: Action Plan Considerations” (5/28/20) 

Each of the above publications was intended to supplement and update the prior publications to reflect most recent emerging data and information available at the time of release. The NCAA has also published  and continues to supplement an FAQ document that contains questions/answers pertaining to the publications.  As the resocialization publications have been updated, they have rendered certain of the FAQ content outdated. Those outdated portions of the FAQ have been removed from the published version and have been archived to this document solely for purposes of historical reference. This content is no longer consistent with the Association’s published position and should not be relied upon as guidance.

Questions can be directed to the NCAA Sport Science Institute at ssi@ncaa.org.

The information in this publication was developed in support of the release of the Core Principles of Resocialization of Collegiate Basketball and Frequently Asked Questions: Principles of Resocialization of Collegiate Basketball and Testing Considerations for All Sports. All information contained in this document should be considered recommendations and/or considerations. As with prior NCAA publications, this document reflects the relevant scientific and medical information available at the time of print. These materials should not be used as a substitute for medical or legal advice. Rather, they are intended as a resource for member schools to use in coordination with applicable government and related institutional policies and guidelines, and they remain subject to further revision as available data and information in this space continue to emerge and evolve.

COVID-19 Testing.

  1. For purposes of the Core Principles of Resocialization of Collegiate Basketball, officials are considered part of the Tier 1 individuals who are tested a minimum of three times a week on nonconsecutive days. Testing can be PCR or antigen with testing ideally beginning one week before assignment (to permit completion of three tests and receipt of results before the start of event activities).
  2. Schools and conferences should proactively work with officials and/or assigning agencies (for example, for multiteam events or NCAA championship games) to determine how costs associated with testing will be managed.
  3. Where an official is only working one game in an entire week, consider a minimum of one test before the game, either PCR within three days before the assignment or antigen/rapid PCR on the same day as the assignment.
  4. For conferences that play conference-only games (or for schools that play games within a specified geographic locale) with one team in one location on consecutive days: officials who work both games need one PCR test within three days before the second game or an antigen/rapid PCR test on the day of each game. If the games are nonconsecutive (for example, Thursday and Saturday), then the PCR test should be within three days before the second game or an antigen test the day of each game. If the crews change, then PCR or antigen testing is for the assigned game of the officials, that is, a PCR within three days before the assigned game or an antigen/rapid PCR test on the day of the assigned game.
  5. Where testing will occur on the same day as competition, the assigning conference should consider coordinating and managing those activities. If the host institution/third-party testing agency is facilitating testing on-site, it should proactively consider how it will liaise with applicable state and local public health officials, including notification of any positive test results and participation in and support of any necessary contact tracing activities.
  6. The time of the testing should be determined based on the type of test and the start of the game. Consideration should be given for replacement officials in the event of a positive test result.
  7. When an official is tested on-site, the host institution should consider how best to provide a holding area for tested officials, and ensure they avoid proximity and contact with other individuals, until results are known.
  8. Schools should consider developing and implementing appropriate protocols that adequately address the following operational factors related to positive or inconclusive test results, in each case in accordance with applicable state and local public health requirements, and they should determine how best to proactively communicate the details of those protocols to game officials, conference officials and all relevant institutional personnel. {
    • Procedures for notifying applicable government health agencies, conference administrators and coordinators, and other impacted stakeholders in the event an official tests positive or has inconclusive test results.
    • Procedures and adequate facilities to appropriately isolate/provide a holding area and provide access to necessary medical care for officials who test positive.
    • Necessary arrangements for proper return transport of an infected, isolated or quarantined official. If the official is to travel home, this must be done with strict adherence to isolation travel (private car/bus/charter) with appropriate personal protective equipment for all.
  9. Currently, neither CDC recommendations nor NCAA guidance suggests that the recommended 14-day quarantine period might be shortened on the basis of a negative test result. In other words, it is not suggested that individuals can “test out of” quarantine requirements. Where it is believed that an antigen test has resulted in a possible false-positive result, materials suggest that normal isolation practices would be followed unless and until a subsequent PCR test could produce a negative test result. Suggested protocols for retesting a possible false positive PCR result currently vary and are managed by state, county and local public health authorities. Conferences and schools will want to take appropriate steps to confirm their retesting protocols are properly aligned with state, county and local regulations.
  10. Emerging information reported on the CDC website suggests retesting of individuals who have previously tested positive for COVID-19 is unlikely to yield useful information, even if the person has had close contact with an infected person, so retesting is not suggested during the 90 days following a positive test unless individuals develop symptoms consistent with COVID-19 and there is no other cause identified for their symptoms. Emerging evidence also suggests that individuals can continue to test positive even after 90 days, yet there is a scarcity of reports that are consistent with individual reinfection. Antibody levels can fluctuate over time, and the clinical meaning of this fluctuation is uncertain. Given such data, for a period of 150 days, retesting should be performed only for those individuals who develop COVID-19 symptoms that are not otherwise explained by another condition. However, after this 90-day window, it is recommended that individuals who experience a high-risk exposure enter quarantine for 14 days.

Communication.

Host institutions should consider proactively communicating with officials about testing and venue information at least 48 hours before the scheduled game and should consider including, among other pertinent information:

  1. Testing times and protocol at the game site, if applicable.
  2. Recommended time of arrival for officials.
  3. Designated point of entry for officials to use to enter/exit the facility.
  4. Screening requirements/protocols needed before entry, if applicable.
  5. Availability of locker room and/or meeting space.
  6. Availability of showers, towels and water bottles.
  7. Protocol for use of the athletic training facility and services.

Travel.

  1. It is important that host institutions, game officials, conferences and conference coordinators stay updated and educated on all applicable federal, state, county and local travel restrictions. Clear and proactive communication with applicable federal, state, county and local health agencies may help facilitate travel logistics and avoid unnecessary restrictions.
  2. Conference coordinators and others involved with scheduling officials should consider whether and to what extent geographically based assignments might help avoid unnecessary travel and otherwise limit risks related to COVID-19 for officials.
  3. Officials should be mindful about masking/distancing and other travel-related risk-mitigation practices described in the CDC travel guidelines and should consider avoiding ride share and any other arrangements that may limit the ability to adhere to these guidelines.

Pregame.

Host schools should consult with conference representatives, as applicable, and carefully consider and determine how best to address all applicable risks related to pregame activities including, among others:

  1. Protocol for officials. Applicable arrival times, locker room and other relevant facility and meeting location information including:
    • Whether the host school has planned to hold pregame conferences virtually before arrival or on-site in a location other than the locker room to facilitate proper physical distancing practices.
    • Whether officials will be permitted to arrive and depart the facility in their game attire.
    • Whether postgame showering in the locker room will be permitted.
    • Reminders about the importance of masking and maintaining adequate distance in the locker room, upon entering the facility and while transitioning to and from the court.
  2. Locker room.
    • Procedures to ensure game officials’ locker rooms and/or meeting areas are adequately cleaned and disinfected before officials’ arrival and that, once cleaned, no access is given to anyone other than the officials.
    • Adequate supply and access to hand sanitizer and disinfectant spray bottles and/or disinfecting wipes in the officials’ locker room.
    • Clean towels assigned for each official, as applicable, for use in the locker room or on the court and procedures to ensure they are only handled by the official to which they are assigned.
  3. Table crew meeting.
    • Consider conducting activity at the scorer’s table, 45 minutes before game time.
    • Remind all individuals about the importance of masking and maintaining adequate physical distance during activity.
    • Consider encouraging the referee to make note of the location of all key table crew positions to ensure they are easily locatable and accessible during the game as needed.
  4. Captains meeting.
    • Consider eliminating or modifying the format of captains/officials meeting to include only the referee and one student-athlete per team.
    • Reminders to captains about the importance of compliance by all individuals with all applicable masking and distancing requirements and that physical contact with officials is prohibited at all times, including during player introductions.
  5. Coaches greeting.
    • Reminders to coaches that handshakes/fist bumps and other physical contact between officials and coaches has been eliminated.

In-game.

Host schools should consult with conference representatives, as applicable, and carefully consider and determine how best to address all applicable risks related to in-game activities including, among others:

  1. Equipment.
    • Consider requiring officials to cover all sides of a whistle to prevent displacement of spit into the air.  Consider asking officials to arrive at the event with an adequate supply of spare coverings.  Consider allowing electronic whistles as a substitute for a traditional whistle.
    • Consider requiring officials to sanitize or replace their whistle covering and mask/face covering at halftime.
    • Reminders to officials about the importance of masking and maintaining adequate physical distance during all situations that require a conference involving officials, coaches and/or players.
    • Reminder to officials that use of protective shatterproof eyewear or goggles and/or gloves is permitted.
    • If a timing system is used, consider procedures to adequately clean and disinfect the system before use by officials.
  2. Interaction with student-athletes and coaches.
    • Reminders to officials about the importance of masking and maintaining adequate physical distance whenever possible, including during timeouts, replays, intermissions and any other extended dead ball situations.
    • Reminders to officials about the importance of avoiding physical contact with players during altercations and that verbal direction and multiple sharp blasts of the whistle should be used, alternatively, to aid in restoring order.
  3. Interaction with the scorer’s table.
    • Reminders to officials about the importance of masking and, as possible, maintaining adequate physical distance, when communicating with any scorer’s table personnel.
    • Reminders to officials that they can adjust their positioning as needed to ensure their communication is seen and heard by the table crew.
  4. Replay.
    • If a replay monitor is used, consider locating the monitor and controller in a place that allows for physical distancing from bench and scorer’s table personnel and consider procedures to ensure the replay controller, monitor controls and headsets are adequately cleaned and disinfected after each use.
    • Reminders to officials to adhere to masking, distancing and other risk mitigation protocols while at the replay monitor and during pre-review and post-review discussions including during communications with TV talent regarding reviews.
    • Consider making disposable masks, gloves and hand sanitizer readily available to officials at the monitor station.
    • Where applicable, consider requiring the instant replay technician to operate the monitor review controls.
  5. Mechanics. Please refer to the COVID-19 safety practices documents developed by the Collegiate Commissioners Association Men’s and Women’s Mechanics Committees as the same are described in the Men’s Rules and Women’s Rules, respectively.

Postgame.

Host schools should consult with conference representatives, as applicable, and carefully consider and determine how best to address all applicable risks related to postgame activities including, among others:

  1. Meals: If postgame meals are provided for officials, consider limiting options to prepackaged grab-and-go items that are accessible to officials while permitting them to adhere to physical distancing protocols.
  2. Consider conducting the officials postgame conference virtually or off-site and, if conducted in the locker room, reminding officials about the importance of continuing to adhere to masking and physical distancing requirements.
  3. Consider prohibiting evaluators and conference personnel from accessing the locker room and, instead, conducting postgame evaluations virtually or over the phone.

Division I National Dashboard.

  1. Consider creating a national dashboard through which information about eligibility of officials, based on adherence to testing and other COVID-19 protocols, can be shared with conferences.
  2. Consider encouraging or requiring each conference to submit a roster of all active officials to the national dashboard.
  3. Consider asking officials to participate in the dashboard by creating a profile and consents to allow applicable conference(s) to review testing information and results. School and conference legal and risk management personnel should identify and adequately address any applicable federal and state privacy requirements beyond the consents provided by officials.
  4. Consider leveraging the dashboard to automate delivery of daily health-related questions to officials and to monitor, manage and document real-time responses. School and conference legal and risk management personnel should identify and adequately address any applicable federal and state privacy requirements, beyond the consents provided by officials, that may result from these activities.
  5. NCAA and conference access will be consistent with the scope of the consents provided by the officials.

Guidance and Recommendations for Game Day Operations - Basketball

The NCAA has released the following guidance documents related to the resocialization of college sports in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic:

  • “Core Principles of Resocialization of Collegiate Sport” (5/1/20)
  • “Resocialization of Collegiate Sport: Developing Standards for Practice and Competition” (7/14/20) 
  • “Resocialization of Collegiate Sport: Action Plan Considerations” (5/28/20) 

Each of the above publications was intended to supplement and update the prior publications to reflect most recent emerging data and information available at the time of release. The NCAA has also published  and continues to supplement an FAQ document that contains questions/answers pertaining to the publications.  As the resocialization publications have been updated, they have rendered certain of the FAQ content outdated. Those outdated portions of the FAQ have been removed from the published version and have been archived to this document solely for purposes of historical reference. This content is no longer consistent with the Association’s published position and should not be relied upon as guidance.

Questions can be directed to the NCAA Sport Science Institute at ssi@ncaa.org.

The focus of this document is to outline guidance and recommendations for institutions as they host basketball competition in their facility. All information contained in this document should be considered recommendations and/or considerations. As with prior NCAA publications, this document reflects the relevant scientific and medical information available at the time of print. These materials should not be used as a substitute for medical or legal advice. Rather, they are intended as a resource for member schools to use in coordination with applicable government and related institutional policies and guidelines, and they remain subject to further revision as available data and information in this space continue to emerge and evolve.

This document covers the period from when student-athletes and other team personnel arrive at the competition site through the competition. This document does not address travel, testing and officiating. For specific recommendations on COVID-19 testing and other health and safety guidance, please refer to the Core Principles of Resocialization of Collegiate Basketball document.

Communication.

  1. Recommend institutions provide visiting teams and officials with information pertaining to their facility at least 72 hours prior to the scheduled game. This document should include:
    1. Which entrance to use to enter/exit the facility.
    2. Any screening requirements needed prior to entry.
    3. Availability of locker room and/or meeting space.
    4. Protocol for use of the athletic training facility, if needed.
    5. Any restrictions on fan attendance.

Personnel.

  1. All individuals necessary to host a home basketball game should be divided into three tiers, as described below. Tiers are based on the ability to wear masks/face coverings, the ability to practice physical distancing (6 feet or greater) and the role played in connection with the competition.  All individuals should wear masks/face coverings and physically distance whenever possible.  Only individuals assigned to Tiers 1 and 2 will be permitted access to the inner bubble (e.g., locker rooms, athletic training room, court area). The inner bubble must always be secured.
    1. Tier 1 — This tier consists of individuals for whom physical distancing and face coverings are not possible or effective during athletic training or competition. Examples of relevant individuals include student-athletes, coaches, athletic trainers and physical therapists, medical staff, equipment staff and officials. Tier 1 individuals should be limited (e.g., 25-30). All Tier 1 individuals should wear masks/face coverings, except for student-athletes and officials on the playing surface. Physical distancing should be adhered to whenever possible.
    2. Tier 2 — This tier consists of individuals who come into close contact with Tier 1 individuals but can reasonably maintain physical distance and use face coverings during their interaction. Examples of relevant individuals include certain team staff (e.g., athletic department staff) and certain operational staff (e.g., security, event staff and league staff). Tier 2 individuals will maintain physical distance and universal masking while performing their jobs, and any interaction with Tier 1 individuals must be approved by the designated event organizer or athletics health care administrator (or designee), and both parties must maintain physical distance and wear face coverings.
    3. Tier 3 — This tier includes individuals who provide event services but are not in the same vicinity with Tier 1 individuals (and should closer contact become necessary, would be reclassified into Tier 2). Tier 3 individuals should minimize contact with Tier 2 individuals and observe masking and physical distancing at all times. Examples of relevant individuals include certain operational staff (e.g., housekeeping, catering, sanitation and transportation) and media/broadcast.
    4. Spectators are not part of Tiers 1, 2 or 3, and, if present, should observe local health official mandates and guidance with seating clearly separated from these tiered individuals at all times, and as per below.
  2. Each host institution’s athletics health care administrator should maintain contact with local and state health officials regarding operations within the competition venue, including oversight of the daily screening log and any health developments of attendees.
  3. Recommend that visiting band and/or cheer groups avoid travel. If the home band and/or cheer groups are permitted, they should be managed as other Tier 2 personnel.

Physical distancing/PPE/masks-face coverings.

  1. Recommend all individuals, regardless of role or function, always wear a mask/face covering prior to entry and within the competition venue. The type of mask/face covering and the proper way to wear it should be consistent with CDC recommendations.
  2. Cough/sneeze etiquette and hand sanitization are recommended at all times.
  3. Face shields may be worn but do not replace masks/face coverings, meaning that a face shield alone is not recommended as sufficient infection control mitigation.
  4. No one outside of Tier 1 and Tier 2 individuals shall be allowed in the team areas (e.g., athletic training room, locker rooms, locker room hallway) when student-athletes are present.
  5. When feasible, Tier 1 and Tier 2 individuals will not enter guest and public areas of the competition venue (e.g., stands, concession stands, concourse, ticket office).
  6. Tier 2 individuals may interact directly with those in Tier 1 only as necessary and upon approval. All parties must wear masks/face coverings and maintain 6 feet of physical distance.
  7. Universal masking and physical distancing are the rule except in the competition or medical care areas.
  8. Medical staff should follow strict hand sanitization, especially during sessions with student-athletes. Whenever feasible, athletic training staff and student-athletes they are treating should maintain masking/face coverings and physical distancing.
  9. Recommend the pregame meeting between game officials and table crew be conducted virtually or in a place that allows for 6 feet of physical distance among participants. Officials should always wear masks/face coverings and maintain physical distancing during all activities except active competitive play.
  10. Recommend eliminating or modifying the captains meeting from its current format.

Cleaning and disinfecting.

  1. Competition venue cleaning staff shall ensure all team and game officials areas are cleaned prior to each practice and competition. This includes, but is not limited to, team and officials locker rooms, coaches’ rooms, restrooms, team bench areas, the playing court, goal unit padding, nets and the scorers’ table surfaces.
  2. Time between practices and games should be adjusted to allow orderly ingress and egress and necessary cleaning protocols to be fully executed. Teams may be restricted to specific entry and exit times to allow cleaning.
  3. Regular cleaning by competition venue staff of all high-touch areas, including, but not limited to, restrooms, handles, call buttons, chairs and workstations.
  4. Athletic training areas, including treatment tables, stools, high-contact areas and equipment, shall be disinfected after each use.
  5. Remind teams and officials to follow personal health guidelines (e.g., wash hands frequently; do not touch your eyes, nose, or mouth; use hand sanitizer; maintain physical distance and wears masks whenever possible).
  6. Minimize physical interactions, such as high-fives, fist bumps and hugs, with members of other teams.
  7. Provide hand sanitizer stations and disinfectant spray bottles and/or disinfecting wipes in each team locker room, bench and scorer’s table.
  8. Recommend the elimination of ball persons who are not Tier 1 individuals. Designate a member of the host institution to clean game court and game balls as outlined.

Hydration and towels.

  1. Hydration:
    1. Team members should drink only out of their own cup/personal water bottle.
    2. Single-use cups with proper disposal are preferred.
    3. Water bottles should be labeled for individual use.
    4. Contactless water dispensers may be used.
    5. Each team should have its own set of hydration coolers (two — one for water, one for sports drink), water bottles and bottle carriers. Cooler carts may remain behind the benches, but coolers shall be replaced once competition concludes.
  2. Towels:
    1. An allotment of clean towels should be placed in the locker room prior to the arrival of the visiting team.
    2. Towels should be used by only one individual for one practice or one half of competition, then laundered.
    3. Multiple towel bins will be needed to discard used towels (locker rooms, athletic training room, bench area, game officials).
    4. An alternative is the use of disposable towels and appropriate disposal container.

Team bench layout.

  1. Team benches. If spacing allows, recommend using multiple rows of seats (with appropriate distance between each seat). Seats should be assigned to specific players and coaches. If an L-shaped configuration is used (which wraps around the baseline), benches must be 6 feet from the end line and must end prior to the 3-foot run-off lane, per NCAA rule 1-3.3 (Men’s Playing Rules and Women’s Playing Rules).
  2. Individual water bottle and towel. Each player and coach will have their own water bottle and towel by their seat. Players and coaches will be responsible for getting their own water and towels, including during timeouts.
  3. Masks/face coverings on the bench. Require that all bench personnel who are not on the court should always wear masks/face coverings. If a face shield is used, it should be done in conjunction with a face mask.
  4. Timeouts. Recommend movable chairs be used during timeouts and period breaks. At the conclusion of each timeout or period break, the timeout chairs will be removed to a location to be cleaned by team staff.

Scorers’ table layout.

  1. Entry tunnels/doors to the seating area:
    1. No attendees seated or gathered next to entry/exit tunnels/doors; maintain at least 6 feet from seating area around tunnels/doors.
    2. Tier 1 and 2 members should have a different entry tunnel/door to the court than Tier 3 members, if possible. Tier 1 and Tier 2 individuals will not use the tunnel/door at the same time.
  2. Plexiglass barriers on the scorers’ table are not necessary and could create a safety issue if the table is not sufficiently removed from the court area. Universal masking and distancing address infection control mitigation. Consideration needs to be given to officials who need access to replay monitors.
  3. Even if a face shield is worn, masks must also be worn.  
  4. Recommend adjusting the courtside setup to allow for physical distancing from playing court and benches. If spacing allows, recommend using multiple rows of seats with appropriate distance between each seat. Only Tier 2 staff at scorers’ table.
    1. Row 1: recommend 4-6 essential Tier 2 staff (e.g., official scorer, shot clock operator, video replay).
    2. Row 2: other essential Tier 2 staff.
    3. On the team bench sideline, Row 1 shall be set back from the playing court sideline a minimum of 6 feet to allow distancing from the court.
    4. Row 2 should be a minimum of 6 feet behind Row 1.
    5. Baseline and/or opposite side of the court may be used for other necessary staff.
    6. A minimum 12-foot physical distance barrier must separate the scorers’ table and bench areas from the general seating area. 
    7. Similar spacing is recommended for “broadcast tables” on the other side of the court.

Facility planning — movement in/around areas.

  1. Entry/exit.
    1. All entrants shall be subject to local health official restrictions and guidance, including health screening and temperature checks, before entering the competition venue.
    2. Entrants should be advised not to enter the venue if they are experiencing any signs or symptoms of COVID-19, feeling unwell or have been in contact with someone who has tested positive.
    3. Head count controls must be in place at each entry point if local guidelines restrict competition venue capacity as needed.
    4. Entry and exit procedures for the competition venue, back-of-house areas and courtside areas will be clearly marked.
    5. No loitering in back-of-house hallways or common spaces.
    6. Entry tunnels/doors to and from the court must be kept clear; no standing in tunnels/doorways.
  2. Fan seating.
    1. Subject to local health official restrictions and guidance.
    2. Recommend that courtside seating be eliminated.  If no Tier 1, 2 or 3 individuals occupy the space opposite the bench and/or scorers’ table area, recommend the first row of fan seating be a minimum of 12 feet from the sideline.  
    3. Recommend the first row of fan seating be a minimum of 12 feet from the back of the bench and/or scorers’ table area, the corners and ends of the court.
  3. Isolation and quarantine rooms.
    1. Diagnostic testing should be readily available for symptomatic or suspected cases of COVID-19.
    2. Recommend that isolation and quarantine rooms be identified and ready for use. Isolation rooms are for newly positive cases or evaluation of individuals with COVID-19 symptoms. Quarantine rooms are for high-risk exposure individuals of newly infected or symptomatic individuals. Local health official reporting protocols should be followed.
  4. HVAC considerations.
    1. Recommend review of HVAC-related engineering controls. Encourage three or more air changes per hour and use of more fresh recharge air vs. recirculation.
    2. Discuss temperature settings targeting a 74+F temperature and 50+% relative humidity.

Locker room.

  1. Recommend all individuals, regardless of role or function, always wear a mask/face covering within the competition venue.
  2. Once Tier 1 individuals reach the team bench, masks/face coverings may be removed for those individuals on the playing court.
  3. Student-athletes and team bench personnel are recommended to wear masks/face coverings within their assigned team locker room.
  4. If spacing allows, recommend 6 foot spacing between seats within the home and away team locker rooms.
  5. Warmup:
    1. Masks/face coverings must be worn while transitioning to and from the locker room and court.
    2. On-court players must replace their masks/face coverings before leaving the court to return to their designated locker room.
  6. Pregame and transitions between games (doubleheaders/MTE):
    1. Teams may stretch and warm up pregame within a designated area or their locker room.
    2. Teams must return fully to their team locker room with two minutes left in the preceding game.
    3. Teams must wait for permission to enter the floor once cleared by the previous teams and appropriate sanitation procedures have been executed.
  7. Showers:
    1. Team members are encouraged to shower at their hotel after the game, as opposed to at the venue (if applicable).
    2. Teams are encouraged to depart the facility immediately after their game. If student-athletes stay in the facility to watch the next game, they should preferably shower at their hotel. If this is not feasible, showering should be limited to prevent non-physically distant interactions.

Handling equipment.

  1. Each team should have its own rack (6-12 or an equal amount) of basketballs for use while in the venue. The basketballs should be cleaned by a designated member of the host institution’s game operations staff (Tier 2) according to manufacturer’s recommendations with dish soap and water, and not with a disinfectant.
  2. Recommend three or four basketballs be set aside for game use only. Recommend replacing the game ball each time a ball goes out of bounds and is touched by an individual not in Tier 1 or 2. Game balls should be cleaned during media timeouts, halftime and each period break with dish soap and water.
  3. Officials’ water/towels should be located behind each basket or on a table across from the scorers’ table. These must be specific to each official and handled only by the officials.

On-court operations.

  1. Eliminate any coach/official/scorers’ table physical contact (e.g., handshakes, fist bumps) at all times.
  2. Recommend eliminating the postgame handshake line involving the two participating teams. Consider some act of sportsmanship, such as the teams lining up at their respective free throw lines and giving congratulatory waves to each other.
  3. Consider eliminating or reducing the time allotted for any halftime and/or timeout promotions to allow the court to be cleaned.
  4. Recommend assigned work areas for the media to minimize the need for cleaning workstations until after media representatives have exited the venue.

Rules, policies and protocols.

  1. Recommend eliminating hard copy stats to the bench.
    Options for stats on the bench:
  • Conferences are encouraged to apply for the technology waiver by Dec. 1, 2020, which allows the transmission of live stats to the bench area (men’s playing rules website and women’s playing rules website).
  • Institutions may place sanitized printers in close proximity to each bench area, allowing coaches to retrieve updated hard copies of stats.
  1. Establish guidelines for host medical staff. Team athletic medical personnel need to follow their established institutional guidelines.
  2. For doubleheaders, add additional time between games to allow for cleaning (at least one hour).
  3. In-venue catering should be limited to packaged, grab-and-go-type options. No catered buffets.
  4. Crowd noise piped into the facility (even during live play) would need to comply with decibel levels to be clarified by the NCAA Men’s and Women’s Playing Rules Committees, along with proper monitoring and enforcement procedures.

COVID-19 Guidance on Multiple Teams in the Same Location

Disclaimer

The Multiple Teams in Same Location document has been developed in support of the release of the Core Principles of Resocialization of Collegiate Basketball and Frequently Asked Questions: Principles of Resocialization of Collegiate Basketball and Testing Considerations for All Sports. As with prior NCAA publications, the materials are meant to be consistent with guidance published by the federal government and its health agencies. This document reflects the relevant scientific and medical information available at the time of publication. These materials are not and should not be used as a substitute for medical or legal advice. Rather, they are intended as a resource for member schools to use in coordination with applicable government and related institutional policies and guidelines and remain subject to revision as available data and information emerge and evolve. 

Questions can be directed to SSI@ncaa.org.

Introduction

This document is intended as a resource when multiple teams are competing in the same location, which may include multiple team events or arrangements by conferences to use the same housing and competition venues over a specific time period. These formats limit travel, create a bubble for participants and allow multiple games to be played over a shortened time period. Adherence to guidance is important to mitigate the risk of infection spread across multiple teams given their shared environment.  

Following are guiding principles for multiple teams competing in the same location during the regular season, but not including the postseason.  

Travel

Travel parties should be limited to essential personnel, with all travelers observing universal masking and physical distancing as possible. Arrangements should be made with the event host to ensure that travel to and from the event site also ensures infection control protocols, including controlling the flow of ingress and egress. The event site should create a bubble for all activities and all on-site rooms, including locker room facilities and dining services.

Testing

Everyone on-site should be identified as Tier 1, Tier 2 or Tier 3, in accordance with the basketball resocialization FAQ document. Tier 1 is the highest exposure tier and consists of student-athletes, coaches, athletic trainers and physical therapists, medical staff, equipment staff and officials. Tier 2 includes certain team staff and certain operational staff who may come into close contact with Tier 1 individuals but can reasonably maintain physical distance and use masks/face coverings. Tier 3 is the lowest exposure tier and includes media and broadcast workers and certain operational staff, such as housekeeping, catering, sanitation and transportation.

Testing expenses are the responsibility of the individual school before departure. On-site testing expenses are the responsibility of the event operator. 

Individuals should undergo the following testing protocol:

Before travel: Tier 1 only

  • If the school is testing three times a week via antigen testing, the prior three tests must be negative, and the last test should be performed within one day of travel. If PCR testing is used, a negative PCR test should be confirmed within two days of travel.
  • Officials are part of Tier 1, and there should be a mechanism in place to confirm that officials have been following the recommendations of testing three times per week and that negative tests results are similar to other Tier 1 individuals. 

On-site testing

  • Arrangements should be in place for all testing (antigen or PCR) to be performed either on-site or in proximity to the site, with results obtained in less than 24 hours.
  • Upon arrival, all Tier 1 individuals, including officials, are quarantined immediately and will receive antigen or PCR testing. All individuals remain in quarantine until a negative test is confirmed.
    • Antigen or PCR testing will continue for all Tier 1 individuals each day before a scheduled competition, and results should be confirmed before the competition. 
  • Tier 2 individuals will be tested upon arrival and will remain in quarantine until a negative test is confirmed. Tier 2 individuals will observe universal masking and physical distancing thereafter and will not interact with Tier 3 individuals. If Tier 2 individuals need to interact with Tier 1 individuals, universal masking and physical distancing should be maintained by all parties in both tiers.
  • Tier 3 individuals will observe universal masking and physical distancing at all times and will not interact with Tier 1 or Tier 2 individuals.

Infection Management

Tier 1 individuals from each team should remain separated from Tier 1 individuals from other teams (and from all Tier 2 and Tier 3 individuals) except during competition. This includes practice times, media interviews and all activities outside athletics.

Arrangements should be in place for PCR testing of anyone who has symptoms consistent with COVID-19 or anyone who tests positive through an antigen test. PCR testing is considered definitive, including when ruling out a false positive antigen test. A plan should be in place for isolating individuals who test positive on-site. Each team should further plan for transportation of newly infected individuals and should coordinate such plans with local public health authorities.

All shared space off the basketball court during practice and competition should be managed in a manner consistent with the public health standard of universal masking and physical distancing. Although public health authorities may determine if spectators are allowed for competitions, crowds should be spaced properly and should not exceed 25% capacity. All spectators should follow universal masking and physical distancing. Individuals who have been consistently sharing space (for example, families) may be seated in pods that are separated from other such groups. There should be a buffer zone of at least 10 feet behind benches to separate fans from the bench and operation desks.

FAQ: Principles of Resocialization of Collegiate Basketball and Testing Considerations for All Sports

The NCAA has released the following guidance documents related to the resocialization of college sports in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic:

  • “Core Principles of Resocialization of Collegiate Sport” (5/1/20)
  • “Resocialization of Collegiate Sport: Developing Standards for Practice and Competition” (7/14/20) 
  • “Resocialization of Collegiate Sport: Action Plan Considerations” (5/28/20) 

Each of the above publications was intended to supplement and update the prior publications to reflect most recent emerging data and information available at the time of release. The NCAA has also published  and continues to supplement an FAQ document that contains questions/answers pertaining to the publications.  As the resocialization publications have been updated, they have rendered certain of the FAQ content outdated. Those outdated portions of the FAQ have been removed from the published version and have been archived to this document solely for purposes of historical reference. This content is no longer consistent with the Association’s published position and should not be relied upon as guidance.

Questions can be directed to the NCAA Sport Science Institute at ssi@ncaa.org.

These frequently asked questions have been developed in support of the release of the Core Principles of Resocialization of Collegiate Basketball (Basketball Guidelines), the fourth in a series of resocialization documents intended to provide guidance to the NCAA membership about issues arising from the COVID-19 global pandemic. The Basketball Guidelines update and extend, and in some cases replace, the guidance provided in the previous three documents (Core Principles, Action Plan, and Developing Standards).  

As with prior NCAA publications, the materials are meant to be consistent with guidance published by the federal government and its health agencies. This document reflects the relevant scientific and medical information available at the time of publication. These materials are not and should not be used as a substitute for medical or legal advice. Rather, they are intended as a resource for member schools to use in coordination with applicable government and related institutional policies and guidelines and remain subject to revision as available data and information emerge and evolve.

Questions can be directed to SSI@ncaa.org.

Why are the Basketball Guidelines considered recommendations and not requirements?

When the Board of Governors elected to mandate the considerations described in the Developing Standards document, there was considerable uncertainty in this country regarding both unprecedented infection rates and accessibility to testing. Further, there were concerns related to student-athletes who did not wish to compete because of COVID-related health issues. In this setting, the Board believed that a mandate would expedite and facilitate membership’s identification and establishment of a reasonable and consistent baseline standard related to in-season safety and student-athlete protection regarding scholarships and eligibility. We now have a better projection regarding testing availability and options and have obtained more information regarding sport and societal resocialization. In this fluid environment, the Board agreed that the Basketball Guidelines should serve as a guidance resource, especially as we continue to assess emerging science and infrastructure.

Are there specific recommendations for student-athletes who may leave and return to campus for holiday break?

Schools should consider how best to encourage all student-athletes to continue strict health/infection control precautions while on break. Because of the combination of travel and possible social interactions, it is important that student-athletes always observe infection mitigation behavior. When they return, it is anticipated that they will self-quarantine, re-enter normal school testing protocols, and have at least one negative test prior to re-entering athletics and participate in transition period activities, as applicable. A prescribed quarantine period for student-athletes returning to campus is not specified as part of the Basketball Guidelines.

What if a school cannot obtain testing three times per week for indoor high transmission risk sports, or for outdoor high transmission risk sports and intermediate transmission risk sports where antigen testing is considered?

The suggestions described in the Basketball Guidelines are not intended to vary based on an institution’s ability to access or obtain testing. Rather, each school is encouraged to work closely with applicable institutional medical/legal/risk management personnel to evaluate all available health and safety information and guidance and to make an informed decision about whether and to what extent identified risks can be appropriately addressed through any other alternative, in each case with an eye toward unique institutional considerations and applicable state and local health agency requirements.

Will there be different guidelines for schools that can limit competitions to a single state or region?

No. The Basketball Guidelines are intended to apply to all schools, regardless of where competitions will occur and whether competing teams are from nearby locations.

Do the testing protocols described in the Basketball Guidelines change if teams are scheduled for back-to-back games over the weekend?

No. Testing is recommended to occur three times per week on nonconsecutive days, regardless of when a team plays. If a team travels to a school and there is a CLIA certified location on site or nearby, testing can be pre-arranged to be performed at this location. It is recommended that conferences and schools make plans for such arrangements in advance. Otherwise, it is anticipated that testing would resume upon return to school, ideally with tests not separated by more than three days.

Has the NCAA COVID-19 Medical Advisory Group considered the possibility of PCR testing two times per week rather than antigen testing three times per week for indoor high transmission risk sports, especially given the differences in sensitivity?

The Advisory Group discussed this matter and concluded that even though PCR testing is more sensitive, schools should still consider testing three times per week for indoor high transmission risk sports using any combination of PCR and/or antigen testing.  *See exception below for student-athletes in indoor high transmission risk sports who practice universal masking and adherence to infection risk mitigation during all training and competition.

Can you clarify the differences between Tier 1 and Tier 2 as described in the Basketball Guidelines? Are there other tiers?

A recently published article in the British Journal of Sports Medicine provides the following explanation of the use of these references:

Tier 1: This is the highest exposure tier and consists of individuals for whom physical distancing and face coverings are not possible or effective during athletic training or competition. Examples of relevant individuals include student-athletes, coaches, athletic trainers and physical therapists, medical staff, equipment staff and officials.

Tier 2: This is a moderate exposure tier and consists of individuals who come into close contact with Tier 1 individuals but can reasonably maintain physical distance and use face coverings. Examples of relevant individuals include certain team staff (e.g., executives) and certain operational staff (e.g., security, event staff and league staff).

Tier 3: This is the lowest exposure tier and includes individuals who provide event services but do not come into close contact with Tier 1 individuals (and should this occur, would be reclassified into Tier 2). Examples of relevant individuals include certain operational staff (e.g., housekeeping, catering, sanitation and transportation) and media/broadcast.

When a Tier 1 individual tests positive, it is suggested that all other Tier 1 individuals quarantine as soon as the results are known for a period of 14 days, with contact tracing beginning immediately to determine who was subject to a high-risk exposure. Does this mean that all Tier 1 individuals are immediately quarantined for 14 days, or does it mean that all Tier 1 individuals are immediately quarantined, and if contract tracing determines they did not have a high-risk exposure, they can return to activity?

It means that all Tier 1 individuals are immediately quarantined for 14 days, and that contact tracing would proceed to determine if all such individuals should remain in quarantine and if there are additional individuals who may have had a high-risk exposure to an infected individual.

The Basketball Guidelines provide that individuals who previously tested positive for COVID-19 do not need to quarantine or get tested again for up to 90 days (for example, even after a high-risk exposure) as long as they do not develop symptoms again. Do these individuals move back into the testing pool after 90 days?

Emerging information reported on the CDC website suggests retesting of these individuals is unlikely to yield useful information, even if the person has had close contact with an infected person, so retesting is not suggested during the 90 days following a positive test unless individuals develop symptoms consistent with COVID-19 and there is no other cause identified for their symptoms. Emerging evidence also suggests that individuals can continue to test positive even after 90 days, yet there is a scarcity of reports that are consistent with individual reinfection. Antibody titers can fluctuate over time, and the clinical meaning of this fluctuation is uncertain. Given such data, in a given season for individuals who have tested positive, retesting should be performed only for those individuals who develop COVID-19 symptoms that are not otherwise explained by another condition. However, after this 90-day window, it is recommended that student-athletes and other individuals who experience a high-risk exposure enter quarantine for 14 days.

Is universal masking suggested during weight training and conditioning?

Yes, masking and physical distancing are suggested whenever feasible.

Will the NCAA be providing additional information about the testing of officials?    

Considerations related to the testing of officials are being developed, and we anticipate that information will be circulated soon. Testing protocols for officials will not be managed or overseen by the NCAA but will be coordinated through conferences and schools.

The NCAA has said it is exploring potential supply arrangements with one or more testing companies. Is updated information available?

We anticipate providing additional information the week of Oct. 12, 2020.

The Basketball Guidelines include direct reference to Division I basketball timelines. Are the guidelines meant to apply equally to Divisions II and III basketball?

Yes. The Basketball Guidelines apply to all divisions. Specific reference was made to the Division I calendar for purposes of clarity, as the Division I Council had just recently determined the structure of both the men’s and women’s basketball seasons.

The Basketball Guidelines organize testing recommendations by the phase of activity that a basketball team will go through, moving from out-of-season countable athletically related activities, to preseason practice, and then competition and postseason. These phases are clearly described in the Division I basketball calendar materials but are less clear in the flexible championship frameworks created by Divisions II and III. How will schools in those divisions know how to progress their testing protocols in response to activity changes?

Blanket waivers in both Divisions II and III created flexible playing and practice season frameworks for all sports. These frameworks are intended to facilitate maximum flexibility for member schools and conferences to configure practice and competitive seasons to occur at times that make the most sense for them. But this flexibility also means that the boundaries between practice and playing seasons are less clear than usual, so it is anticipated that testing protocol decisions will be made at the institutional or conference level based on an assessment of the nature of the practice/competition activities in which the team is involved.

If practice activities are generally consistent with out-of-season activities (strength and  conditioning, team meetings, limited skill instruction), it would be reasonable to interpret the Basketball Guidelines as suggesting surveillance testing for countable athletically related activities to be appropriate. If those practice activities are consistently on-court and resemble preseason activities that preclude scrimmages with teams outside the member school, then it would be reasonable to conclude that the Basketball Guidelines would suggest weekly testing until one week before competition begins. One week before the regular season begins, and extending into the postseason, testing would transition to three times per week.

Divisions II and III have provided scheduling flexibility for the conduct of the 2020-21 basketball season. As schools and conferences begin to configure and schedule practice and competition periods, do they need to build in and account for a separate transition period prior to the start of other preseason activities to adequately address health and safety concerns?

No. Previous guidance related to considerations around variability in the physiologic readiness of student-athletes, the conduct of mandatory medical examinations, and the importance of acclimatization and transition periods would apply equally in these circumstances. Schools are expected to establish an appropriate initial transition period during which student-athletes are afforded the time to properly progress through the physiologic and environmental stresses placed upon them as they return to required activities. It is anticipated that the period would be 7-10 days, completed before the start of any other required physical activities, and otherwise consistent with Interassociation Recommendations: Preventing Catastrophic Injury and Death in Collegiate Athletes. While it is expected that these principles would be applied any time there is a material break (e.g., greater than one week) between training segments, and that teams would work closely with applicable medical and strength and conditioning personnel to intentionally identify and apply appropriate protocols that best support the needs of their student-athletes, it has not been identified as necessary to include a separate transition period distinct from the preseason period within the broader scheduling calendar.

Sports other than basketball

As data and science evolves, formal modifications to previous resocialization documents will be presented through additional process and membership discussion. In the interim, the following approaches are offered for consideration.

All sports are classified as having low, intermediate or high risk for transmission, with appropriate testing strategies for each sport. Schools and conferences are urged to consider these strategies as they make decisions regarding return to practice and competition.

What are recommended testing protocols for sports other than basketball?

The NCAA COVID-19 Medical Advisory Group has assessed other sports and provided updated guidance based on emerging information. Importantly, the updated guidance differentiates high transmission risk sports that are played indoors versus outdoors. Further, the updated guidance differentiates high transmission risk indoor sports in which Tier 1 individuals universally mask versus Tier 1 individuals who do not universally mask during practice and competition. Highlighted text indicates a change from the Developing Standards document.

Sport classification

  • Low transmission risk: bowling, diving, equestrian, fencing, golf, rifle, skiing, swimming, tennis, track and field.
  • Intermediate transmission risk: acrobatics and tumbling, baseball, beach volleyball, cross country, gymnastics, softball, triathlon.
  • High transmission risk: basketball, field hockey, football, ice hockey, lacrosse, rowing, rugby, soccer, squash, volleyball, water polo, wrestling.

Testing strategies

  • Low transmission risk: Testing is performed in conjunction with a school plan for all students, plus additional testing for symptomatic and high infection risk individuals as warranted.
  • Intermediate transmission risk:
    • Out-of-season athletic activities: Testing is performed in conjunction with a school plan for all students, plus additional testing for symptomatic and high infection risk individuals as warranted.
    • In-season: Testing once weekly by PCR testing, or three times weekly by antigen testing. [This is increased from 25-50% surveillance testing every two weeks and adds antigen testing as an option.]
  • High transmission risk:
    • Out-of-season athletic activities: Surveillance PCR testing, for example, 25%-50% of athletes and Tier 1 nonathlete personnel every one to two weeks if physical distancing, masking and other protective features are not maintained, plus additional testing for symptomatic and high infection risk individuals as warranted. [The option of testing every one to two weeks was added, as certain local circumstances may suggest weekly surveillance testing as a medically preferred alternative.]
    • Preseason: Testing once weekly by PCR testing, or three times weekly by antigen testing. [The antigen testing is added as an option.]
    • Regular and postseason, outdoor sports: Testing once weekly by PCR testing, or three times weekly by antigen testing. [The antigen test has been added.]
    • Regular and postseason, indoor sports: Testing three times weekly on nonconsecutive days, beginning one week prior to the first competition. PCR or antigen testing may be used. If all training and competition are done with universal masking and adherence to infection risk mitigation, then testing can be considered in a manner consistent with outdoor high transmission risk sports. [This recommendation places all indoor high transmission risk sports on a testing recommendation protocol that is consistent with basketball, and it represents an increase in suggested testing frequency from the Developing Standards document, which did not differentiate indoor from outdoor sports. It also differentiates indoor high transmission risk sports where universal masking and adherence to infection risk mitigation occurs in all Tier 1 individuals even during training and competition.]

Core Principles of Resocialization of Collegiate Basketball

The NCAA has released the following guidance documents related to the resocialization of college sports in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic:

  • “Core Principles of Resocialization of Collegiate Sport” (5/1/20)
  • “Resocialization of Collegiate Sport: Developing Standards for Practice and Competition” (7/14/20) 
  • “Resocialization of Collegiate Sport: Action Plan Considerations” (5/28/20) 

Each of the above publications was intended to supplement and update the prior publications to reflect most recent emerging data and information available at the time of release. The NCAA has also published  and continues to supplement an FAQ document that contains questions/answers pertaining to the publications.  As the resocialization publications have been updated, they have rendered certain of the FAQ content outdated. Those outdated portions of the FAQ have been removed from the published version and have been archived to this document solely for purposes of historical reference. This content is no longer consistent with the Association’s published position and should not be relied upon as guidance.

Questions can be directed to the NCAA Sport Science Institute at ssi@ncaa.org.

As indicated below, these materials are intended as a resource for member schools to use in coordination with applicable government and related institutional policies and guidelines, and they remain subject to further revision as available data and information in this space continue to emerge and evolve. This document addresses basketball only, and future documents will address other winter sports. Unless stated otherwise (for example, testing recommendations), the guidance from Resocialization of Collegiate Sport: Developing Standards for Practice and Competition (Resocialization Standards) remains in place; athletics personnel are encouraged to review this document.

Introduction

The Resocialization Standards focused on the development of standards for practice and competition. Importantly, basketball was listed as a high contact risk sport with regard to COVID-19. Further, outdoor training was noted to be preferred over indoor training with good ventilation where feasible, and indoor training with good ventilation was noted to be preferred over indoor training with poor ventilation. This document serves as an update to the third publication, with a singular focus on basketball. 

The information in this publication was developed in consultation with the NCAA COVID-19 Medical Advisory Group, which includes team physicians; infectious disease and public policy experts; representatives from the membership; and representatives from the NCAA COVID-19 Advisory Panel, National Athletic Trainers’ Association, American Medical Society for Sports Medicine, the National Medical Association, the Autonomy-5 Medical Advisory Group, and the NCAA Committee on Competitive Safeguards and Medical Aspects of Sports. While the federal government has not yet published uniform federal guidance related to certain practices like diagnostic testing protocols, contact tracing and surveillance, these groups have, through their continued review and evaluation of available research data, anecdotal evidence and related analysis and discussion, identified certain practices that should be highlighted for more focused consideration by member schools. While the materials encourage consideration of various factors and actions, they do not speak to every possible scenario, and in no event should members fall below national or applicable public health standards set by their local or state communities.

As with prior NCAA publications, the materials are meant to be consistent with guidance published by the federal government and its health agencies. This document reflects the relevant scientific and medical information available at the time of print. These materials should not be used as a substitute for medical or legal advice. Rather, they are intended as a resource for member schools to use in coordination with applicable government and related institutional policies and guidelines, and they remain subject to further revision as available data and information in this space continue to emerge and evolve.

Behavioral Infection Risk Mitigation

Even with frequent testing for COVID-19, the most important risk mitigation strategy remains a combination of daily self-health checks, physical distancing, universal masking and hand sanitization. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommendations include the following for proper wearing of face masks:

  • Wash your hands before putting on your mask.
  • Put it over your nose and mouth and secure it under your chin.
  • Try to fit it snugly against the sides of your face.
  • Make sure you can breathe easily.
  • Masks with exhalation valves or vents should not be worn to help prevent the person wearing the mask from spreading COVID-19 to others (source control).

Basketball student-athletes and all athletics staff personnel who interact with the athletes should be appropriately educated about and actively participate in mitigation of COVID-19 infection through proper behavior at all times. Time away from athletics, especially social events, may be riskier than sport; therefore, all basketball athletes and staff should be vigilant at all times.

Testing Update

Two testing paradigms dominate the United States market at present. There continues to be no national testing standard, and testing availability remains problematic for certain tests and in certain parts of the country. We have attempted to highlight and summarize some of the considerations around recent advances in testing below but encourage all schools to work closely with applicable medical personnel to evaluate and discuss the benefits and limitations of each of these alternatives before deciding on a specific testing strategy. Further, schools are encouraged to proactively pursue discussions with local hospitals and/or local CLIA-certified labs. (The Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments regulate laboratory testing and require clinical laboratories to be certified by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services before they can accept human samples for diagnostic testing.)

Nucleic Acid Amplification Tests

Nucleic acid amplification tests, including polymerase chain reaction, are considered the standard against which other tests are evaluated. This technology amplifies the RNA of the SARS-CoV-2 virus, thereby allowing detection of minimal quantities of virus particles. Samples are obtained via nasopharyngeal, oropharyngeal, or nasal swabs, or by collection of saliva.  Traditionally, PCR tests were limited by the following:

  • Proper collection, including personal protection equipment for those obtaining samples.
  • Reagent availability for test completion.
  • Laboratory and personnel capacity.
  • Cost (approximately $100-$150 per test). 

When access to a dedicated laboratory is not a challenge, and there are no public health contraindications to performing tests on asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic individuals, turnaround time for testing can be within 24 hours. However, due to lab access and other challenges, PCR lab-based testing in the general population will often have a turnaround time of more than 72 hours. Delayed turnaround can limit the utility of testing, especially when the individual being tested is not living within a bubble that minimizes the risk of disease transmission.

Two advances have improved PCR testing availability and turnaround time:

  1. Saliva PCR testing that bypasses traditional nucleic acid extraction/reagent.
    1. SalivaDirect was developed in partnership with Yale University and the National Basketball Association and was issued an emergency use authorization from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Aug. 15. SalivaDirect uses the collection of saliva in a container that does not require nucleic acid preservatives at sample collection, and it replaces nucleic acid extraction with a simple step that does not require reagents that may be in short supply. Therefore, use of SalivaDirect can help bypass resource risks related to sample collection and bottlenecking of reagent supply. SalivaDirect is a protocol, not a kit, and does require an authorized lab (meaning it is not point-of-care testing). This testing methodology can be performed using several common and available reagents. Any high complexity CLIA-certified lab within the Unites States may become authorized to use SalivaDirect through a submission process. Turnaround time for testing depends on the working arrangement with the lab and its dedicated personnel and lab infrastructure. The time will be highly reliant on laboratory automation. The estimated cost is $5 per test, although commercial labs may charge up to $30 per test. Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign developed a similar saliva-based PCR test, which is being used for frequent testing of students, faculty and staff. The university’s dedicated lab can process 1,000-2,500 tests every four hours. The SalivaDirect test is projected to have widespread availability over the next several weeks. More information about SalivaDirect protocol and lab authorization can be found here and on the FDA website.
    2. Ambry Genetics offers a program that includes saliva-based PCR tests that can be self-collected as part of its broader CARE for COVID program, and results can be delivered within a fast turnaround through a portal compliant with federal privacy laws on the release of medical information. PCR tests can be further expedited through custom critical delivery services to meet the turnaround time necessary for each school or conference. More information about Ambry Genetics can be found here and on the FDA website.
  2. Molecular-based point-of-care tests use PCR but do not require transport to a dedicated lab. Rather, the tests are performed on-site with a dedicated machine and test kits. Abbott ID NOW is another product issued an emergency use authorization and is a prototype for this type of test. Such testing requires oversight of a CLIA-certified physician (for example, a team physician who obtains the certificate), and testing can be performed by properly trained individuals who report to the CLIA-certified physician. The test kit includes a dedicated nasal swab, and tests are run individually, taking about 15 minutes per test. Each instrument costs $5,000, and test kits cost $41 per test. Given the individual nature of testing, use of this method likely would require five to seven instruments per school. Abbott ID NOW is currently not widely available and is approved for use with symptomatic individuals only (meaning testing asymptomatic individuals would be “off-label”). Production increases may lead to more widespread availability in November or December. More information about the test can be found here and on the FDA website.

Antigen Testing

Unlike nucleic acid amplification tests, antigen testing is performed by identification of an inner nucleocapsid protein of the virus using a fluorescent immunoassay. This means that the number of viral particles per sample must be substantially higher than PCR testing (thereby possibly increasing false negative tests). Although specificity in symptomatic individuals is high (thereby decreasing false positive tests), false positive test rates in asymptomatic populations is less well understood for antigen testing. Antigen testing is used with point-of-care instruments and/or test kits. Antigen testing that has been approved or is on the horizon includes the following:

  1. Quidel Sofia/Sofia 2 is FDA authorized for emergency use and includes the analyzer and test kits. The most common pathway for obtaining the instruments and test kits is through a partnership with distributors who also may provide clinical services, although there are active discussions to centralize purchasing of instruments and test kits. The Department of Health and Human Services has purchased the majority of available Sofia instruments and test kits, and the next major shipment is expected in November. There may be alternative pathways before November, and we will provide additional updates as they become available. More information about Sofia/Sofia 2 can be found here and on the FDA website.
  2. Abbott BinaxNOW is a newly released antigen test with emergency use authorization. The test does not require an instrument, but rather is a simple folding card test kit with nasal swab that provides a yes or no result in 15 minutes. A kit content is 40 test cards and nasal swabs. The cost is $200 for 40 cards, meaning $5 per test. This test requires CLIA physician oversight, similar to Sofia. HHS purchased 150 million test kits, and Abbott can produce 50 million per month beginning in October. Therefore, widespread availability is expected to begin around January. More information about BinaxNOW can be found here and on the FDA website.
  3. Other point-of-care antigen tests are expected to enter the U.S. market in late November or December, including Quest Diagnostics, E25Bio and BD Veritor tests, as well as additional offerings through the Ambry CARE for COVID program. We will provide additional updates on emerging point-of-care antigen tests as they become available.

Testing Protocols

Training and competing in basketball require frequent, sustained close contact among players, coaching and other essential staff, and officials in an indoor setting. Schools are encouraged to proactively define those individuals who constitute the “inner bubble” (Tier 1), which includes student-athletes and essential basketball personnel whose job function requires direct access to players on a regular basis, specifically close contact (6 feet or less) for 15 minutes or more, as per CDC guidance. Tier 1 individuals may differ from school to school (for example, some coaches maintain physical distancing at all times and therefore are not part of Tier 1). Tier 1 individuals are considered to be at higher risk of becoming infected with COVID-19 if any other individual in the group is contagious and masking/physical distancing has not been maintained. The situation is further compounded because the nature of basketball makes it challenging to train in functional units (as described in the Resocialization Standards). 

A typical basketball team has 15 players, all of whom typically train on a single basketball court at the same time in an enclosed space. Generally speaking, it is expected that the total number of Tier 1 individuals within a team would approximate 25-30. If any Tier 1 individual becomes infected, schools should consider quarantining the entire team, including coaching staff and other essential personnel who are part of Tier 1, for 14 days, provided determinations around who must be quarantined are ultimately the jurisdiction of applicable public health officials. At present, there is not a recommendation for consideration of testing out of quarantine.

Surveillance vs. Symptomatic Testing

If an individual has symptoms suggestive of or consistent with COVID-19, symptomatic testing performed via PCR is suggested. For asymptomatic surveillance screening during countable athletically related activities, the preseason, regular season and postseason, testing should be considered as outlined below via PCR or antigen testing.

Of note, CDC guidance provides that individuals who previously tested positive for COVID-19 do not need to quarantine or get tested again for up to three months (for example, even after a high-risk exposure) as long as they do not develop symptoms again. However, if such individuals develop symptoms consistent with COVID-19, they require reevaluation and may need to be tested again if there is no other cause identified for their symptoms.

Countable Athletically Related Activities

Based on the basketball start-of-season model adopted by the Division I Council, countable athletically related activities, also referred to as the transition period, run Sept. 21 through Oct. 13, 2020. During the period when countable athletically related activities are occurring but before the preseason begins, surveillance testing should be considered for 25%-50% of student-athletes and Tier 1 individuals every two weeks if physical distancing, masking and other protective features are not consistently maintained, plus additional testing for symptomatic and high contact risk individuals. This is consistent with the Resocialization Standards.

Preseason

Based on the basketball start-of-season model adopted by the Division I Council, the preseason period begins Oct. 14 and ends Nov. 24. During the preseason, it is anticipated that physical distancing and masking will be compromised. However, if there are no scrimmages with outside teams, student-athletes and other Tier 1 individuals will not be interacting with individuals outside the member school environment during practice. Based on this expectation, testing should be considered weekly for all Tier 1 individuals during this time. This is consistent with the Resocialization Standards. If scrimmages occur with outside schools, then the testing protocol for the regular season and postseason should be considered.

Regular-Season and Postseason Competition

Based on the basketball start-of-season model adopted by the Division I Council, the regular season begins Nov. 25. Because of the frequency of games and travel, coupled with the risk of infection in basketball, it is suggested that COVID-19 testing occur three times per week on nonconsecutive days for Tier 1 individuals during the regular season and postseason competition periods. It is suggested that the three-time-a-week testing begin one week before the first competition. 

Even though some tests may be less sensitive and more prone to false negative results than others (for example, antigen vs. lab-based PCR), the frequency of testing decreases considerably the mathematical odds of the same individual obtaining a false negative test repeatedly. However, because false positive tests are more likely to occur in asymptomatic populations, schools may want to consider performing a confirmatory PCR test with any asymptomatic individual who tests positive. 

As identified in the Resocialization Standards publication, game officials should be considered Tier 1 individuals during the regular season and postseason such that the same frequency of testing would be suggested for them. Schools should arrange for testing paradigms that make the most sense locally.

Membership is encouraged to work closely with school and conference medical and operations personnel to proactively identify and arrange for necessary testing paradigms that can be adequately supported through available school, local and conference resources.

Practice Without Competition

For schools that are holding basketball practice but are not competing against other schools, it is suggested that testing be performed as per the preseason recommendations.

Quarantine and Isolation Considerations

Tier 1 Individuals With High Risk Exposure

When a Tier 1 individual tests positive, it is suggested that all other Tier 1 individuals quarantine as soon as the results are known for a period of 14 days, with contact tracing beginning immediately to determine who was subject to a high-risk exposure. Ultimately, the applicable public health officials have jurisdiction to make these determinations. Schools can consider the need for and potential benefit of training on-site personnel in contact tracing through accepted courses such as the Coursera class, as access to additional trained staff can be an invaluable contact tracing resource with respect to institutional risk-management efforts and resources. 

Exercise While in Quarantine

Consistent with the Resocialization Standards, it is suggested that student-athletes who are placed in quarantine for high risk contact but who are not infected with COVID-19 be permitted to exercise individually if such exercise does not cause cardiopulmonary symptoms. If individual exercise is performed outside, schools should consider monitoring all such outdoor activities to ensure physical distancing and masking as appropriate, and such exercise should be consistent with applicable public health official guidance. Group exercise is not recommended. It is suggested that all student-athletes placed in quarantine be monitored for the development of symptoms and undergo testing if symptoms develop. 

Isolation and Return to Sport for Infected Individuals

It is suggested that schools continue to consider the isolation and return-to-sport guidance provided in the Resocialization Standards for individuals who test positive, including those considerations related to cardiac testing.

The Basketball Bench

The basketball bench has historically involved most Tier 1 individuals sitting or standing in close proximity to one another throughout the game. Because it is assumed that these Tier 1 individuals have tested negative and are already in close contact while on the court, it is not suggested that they must observe physical distancing and universal masking while on the bench. However, it is suggested that the basketball bench be physically separated from all other individuals who are not part of Tier 1. Logistics should be considered to address risks related to personnel who must be at the game but are not part of Tier 1. It is suggested that these individuals, referred to as Tier 2 individuals, including other essential basketball personnel who occasionally may need to be in close proximity to student-athletes and other Tier 1 individuals and who may need to access restricted areas periodically, observe masking and physical distancing at all times and be prevented from interacting with any of the basketball bench individuals unless physical distancing and masking are in place for all. 

Similarly, other adjustments to address close contact risks within the bench area (for example, reduction/removal of unnecessary scoring, statistics and other paperwork, moving the scorers’ table to the opposite side of the court, etc.) also are encouraged where feasible, provided it is acknowledged that these types of adjustments may require further evaluation of existing rules. 

Travel Considerations

Schools should continue to evaluate the current data regarding the risks and considerations identified in the Resocialization Standards related to commercial plane and other travel. These considerations include, among others, travel protocols that maximize the opportunity for physical distancing and call for universal masking for all individuals traveling; the availability of alternative travel by private car, van, chartered bus or chartered plane; proper communication of all travel rules, protocols and expectations to everyone in the travel party; prepackaged meals, room service, takeout and outdoor dining options as alternatives to inside restaurant dining; and, when feasible, traveling and playing on the same day to avoid overnight stays. In addition, schools should consider restricting the size of travel parties as much as possible, ideally requiring they are not greater than 30 individuals. Many states still have in place quarantine protocols that make travel impractical. Therefore, state and local guidelines must be considered before any anticipated travel for competition.

Considerations for Symptomatic Management During Travel

Schools should consider management strategies for student-athletes and other essential basketball personnel who travel for competition and become symptomatic after departure. Traveling teams should consider confirming, ahead of time, whether host schools have adequate on-site testing capabilities to address symptomatic athletes from either team and adequate health care resources to properly isolate and care for anyone who tests positive or is symptomatic. The traveling team also should consider, ahead of time, necessary arrangements for proper return transport of infected, isolated and quarantined student-athletes and personnel, in each case in accordance with applicable state and local public health requirements.

Considerations Related to the Discontinuation of Athletics

Although at the time of this writing, reported data reflects that the rate of spread of COVID-19 has been decreasing or has stabilized  in many regions of the country, athletics departments and member schools should continue to consider the parameters for discontinuing athletics, as per Resocialization Standards and the related NCAA Board of Governors mandate. Despite reported improvements, local circumstances and risks may still create uncertainty around safety in high contact risk sports such that schools should continue to work with applicable public health officials and consider pausing or discontinuing athletics activities. Some examples of such local circumstances that might trigger a conversation with applicable public health officials:

  • A lack of ability to isolate new positive cases or quarantine high contact risk cases on campus.
  • Unavailability or inability to perform symptomatic, surveillance and pre-competition testing when warranted and as recommended in this document.
  • Campuswide or local community test rates that are considered unsafe by applicable public health officials.
  • Inability to perform adequate contact tracing consistent with governmental requirements or recommendations.
  • Applicable public health officials stating that there is an inability for the hospital infrastructure to accommodate a surge in hospitalizations related to COVID-19.

COVID-19 Medical Advisory Group

The NCAA COVID-19 Medical Advisory Group includes medical professionals from all three divisions and each of the Autonomy 5 conferences, plus representatives from organizations and medical groups that have been working collaboratively with the original advisory panel and NCAA membership. 

The purpose of the Medical Advisory Group includes:

  • Reviewing emerging COVID-19 research and data to provide guidance to the NCAA membership regarding training, practice and competition, with a primary focus on testing paradigms and mitigating infection spread.
  • Specifically providing guidance regarding appropriate COVID-19 protocols applicable to training, practice and competition in winter and spring sports.
  • Providing guidance for conducting all sports competitions and championships, including on-site management of student-athletes and essential personnel, nonessential personnel and fans.
  • Providing guidance related to physiological, medical and mental health consequences of COVID-19.
  • Assessing other emerging information such as vaccines and new medical treatments for the purpose of providing guidance to NCAA member schools.

Committee Members

  • Dr. Chad Asplund, professor, family medicine and orthopedics at Mayo Clinic
  • Dr. Doug Aukerman, senior associate athletics director for sports medicine at Oregon State
  • Dr. Arthur Caplan, professor and founding head of the division of medical ethics at NYU School of Medicine and chair of the Compassionate Use Advisory Committee
  • Dr. Deena Casiero, director of sports medicine, head team physician at Connecticut
  • Dr. Jeremy Cauwels, chief medical officer and senior vice president of quality at Sanford Health
  • Dr. Stephanie Chu, team physician at Colorado and member of the NCAA Committee on Competitive Safeguards and Medical Aspects of Sport
  • Dr. Jay Clugston, team physician at Florida
  • Dr. Carly Day, head team physician at Purdue
  • Dr. Carlos del Rio, distinguished professor of medicine at Emory University School of Medicine and professor of global health and epidemiology at the Rollins School of Public Health of Emory University
  • Dr. Kyle Goerl, director of student health at Kansas State
  • Murphy Grant, Sr. Associate AD, Athletics Health Care Administrator at Wake Forest University
  • Dr. Nicholas Haddad, associate professor of infectious disease at Central Michigan
  • Dr. Leon McDougle, chief diversity officer, professor of family medicine at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center; associate dean for diversity and inclusion at The Ohio State University; president of the National Medical Association
  • Dr. Mark Stovak, team physician at Nevada and second vice president of the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine
  • Dr. Jeff Williams, director of athletics at East Central University
  • Dr. Cameron Wolfe, associate professor of medicine at Duke and associate of the Duke Initiative for Science & Society

NCAA Staff Liaisons

  • Dr. Brian Hainline, NCAA chief medical officer
  • Col. (Ret.) Dallas Hack, former director of the combat casualty care research program for the Department of Defense
  • Cari Van Senus, NCAA vice president of policy and chief of staff
  • Anthony Holman, NCAA managing director of championships
  • JoAn Scott, NCAA managing director of the Division I men’s basketball championship

Student-Athlete Liaisons

  • Paxton Blanchard, Keene State College lacrosse player and Division III Student-Athlete Advisory Committee member
  • Wiley Cain, Kentucky Wesleyan College football player and Committee on Competitive Safeguards and Medical Aspects of Sports student-athlete representative
  • Dominic Franklin, Texas Southern University football player and Division I Student-Athlete Advisory Committee member
  • Bianca Lockamy, Virginia Union basketball player and Division II Student-Athlete Advisory Committee member
  • Krissy Ortiz, former Lynn University golfer and Division I Student-Athlete Experience Committee student-athlete representative
  • Corbin Thaete, Cal State San Marcos soccer player and Division II Student-Athlete Advisory Committee member

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