Institutional Performance Program

Division I Institutional Performance Program

The goal of the NCAA Division I Institutional Performance Program is to provide institutional leaders with vital and significant data to assist with planning, performance and oversight of their intercollegiate athletics program.

The program guides and supports members with data models, data management and reporting in order to safeguard the health and well-being of student-athletes and promote the integrity of the institution.

The IPP is overseen by the Division I Strategic Vision and Planning Committee.

IPP Resources

Division III Institutional Performance Program (IPP)

The IPP consolidates data institutions have already submitted into a user-friendly format with reporting and benchmarking functionality.  It provides institutions and conference better visibility into the data with the hope it will facilitate better informed decisions and strategic planning on campuses and at the conference level. Click here for an overview of the IPP.

Why should I use the IPP?

  • There’s no extra work on your end. The data annually submitted to the NCAA is already in the system.
  • A secured, powerful platform provides information you can rely on.
  • The peer comparison feature lets you compare your institution or conference, privately, in all data categories to existing peers (for example, conference and all Division III) and to other peer groups of your own choosing.

How do I access the IPP?

You must have an ncaa.org account (user ID and password) and proper access.  If you do, click here. If you’re on a campus and an account doesn’t already exist, please contact your SSO administrator (typically the Director of Athletics).  They can establish your account and assign you access to the IPP.  Conference Commissioners can log into SSO and assign access to themselves. Once access has been assigned and you’ve logged in, click the IPP icon.

Where does the data come from?

  1. Sports Sponsorship and Demographics Form (due August 1st): Required submission of information for student-athletes, athletics administrators and coaches.
  2. Graduation Rates Data Collection System (due June 1st): Required submission of student-body information and voluntary submission of student-athlete information.
  3. NCAA Financial Reporting System (due January 15th): Voluntary submission of athletics finance information.

All three systems are available to campus-levelusers with proper access here.

How can the IPP help me?

  • ACADEMICS: Review graduation rates data, including trends by gender, race/ethnicity and sport.  Additional information about graduation rates can be found here.
  • STUDENTS:  View student-athlete data and compare their characteristics with those at peer institutions and conferences; view how student-athletes compare with the entire undergraduate population in regard to gender and reported ethnicity/racial groups; compare sports sponsorship with peer institutions and conferences.  Additional information about the diversity of student-athletes can be found here.
  • LEADERSHIP: See breakdown of assistant and head coaches and administrators by gender, sport and race/ethnicity and compare their characteristics with peer groups, your conference and other conferences.  Additional information about the diversity of coaches and athletics administrators can be found here.
  • FINANCIAL: View how expenses are trending; research compensation data for head and assistant coaches and administrators to compare against peer groups; and better understand the expense implications of adding a sport(s).  Additional information about the finances of intercollegiate athletics can be found here.

Questions?

Contact Eric Hartung, ehartung@ncaa.org, 317/917.6306

NCAA Division II Institutional Performance Program: Data Management System Frequently Asked Questions

Is there a way to display a team’s win-loss record or competitive success within the NCAA Division II Institutional Performance Program (IPP) data management system?

Although this has not been a common question asked, the technology is set up to add such a data element provided it has a source from which to pull the data (e.g., NCAA statistics database).

Will the IPP data management system include data on enforcement violations?

Not at the present time.

Will the IPP data management system provide a conference view?

Not at the present time, but conferences will be able to access the data of each of their member institutions, provided they are granted access to the same.  In effect, the conference comparison group is a conference view of the data.  Conference-specific views are under discussion by the NCAA Division II Membership Committee for further development as IPP evolves.

If an institution belongs to a conference in a single sport, what conference will be displayed as the default comparison conference in the system?

An institution’s multisport athletics conference will be reflected as the default conference comparator in the data indicator charts within the IPP data management system.

Will an NCAA Division II or Division III institution that sponsors a Division I sport have access to the IPP data management system?

Only active Division I and Division II institutions will have access to the data management system.

How will institutions grant access to individuals not in the “top five” (e.g., institutional chief financial officer)?

The institution’s single-source sign-on (SSO) administrator will be able to grant access to the IPP application to anyone on campus with an SSO account, provided the institution’s chancellor/president has approved that individual(s) to receive access.  The committee will provide access information to the membership in advance of the launch of the IPP data management system.

Will the IPP data management system eliminate the NCAA Financial Dashboards system?

No.  The IPP financial data indicators are a high-level summary of the data included within the financial dashboards.  The financial dashboards also include functionality which permits forecasting and that is not a feature currently included within IPP.

Does the IPP data management system permit a peer comparison group consisting of multiple conferences?

In order to create a peer group comprised of multiple conferences, an end user will need to manually select the institutions comprising that group of conferences

NCAA Division II Institutional Performance Program: One-In-Four-Year Inclusion Review Questions and Answers

NCAA Division II Institutional Performance Program Commitment to Inclusion.

Membership in the Association places the responsibility on each institution to establish and maintain an environment that values cultural diversity and gender equity among its student-athletes and intercollegiate athletics department staff.  In accordance with this responsibility, NCAA Division II member institutions shall:

  1. Conduct and promote athletics programs free from gender discrimination and in compliance with all applicable federal and state laws and NCAA legislation regarding gender equity.
  2. Develop and administer nondiscriminatory governance policies, educational programs, activities and employment policies and procedures.  It is the responsibility of each member institution to determine its own policies and procedures regarding nondiscrimination and to ensure that they comply with federal and state law protections.
  3. Create diverse and inclusive environments, promote an atmosphere of respect for and sensitivity to the dignity of every person, and include diverse perspectives in the pursuit of academic and athletic excellence.
  4. Develop inclusive practices that foster positive learning and competitive environments for student-athletes, as well as professional development opportunities for athletics administrators, coaches and staff from diverse backgrounds.

Overview

As a best practice, each institution should conduct a qualitative inclusion review once every four years to fully assess its athletics department's performance regarding equitable treatment of student-athletes by gender, race and/or ethnicity.  The one-in-four-year inclusion review is meant to provide guidance related to a high-level review of inclusion-related efforts on campus, and is not designed to replace any requirements of federal law. The one-in-four-year inclusion review will provide institutional leaders with qualitative data to assess the institution's and athletics department's environment for student-athletes, coaches and staff. 

The following questions and answers will assist institutional leaders with guidance on how to conduct the qualitative components of an inclusion review to better assist in the evaluation and oversight of their intercollegiate athletics program.

 

What is the relationship between this review and the institution's responsibility to comply with federal law?

Answer:  All NCAA member institutions are expected to comply with federal and state laws.  This review is not a substitute for institutional efforts in fulfilling federal and state laws to which they are subject.

What if the institution already conducts an inclusion review (e.g., hires an outside consultant to conduct a Title IX review, conducts an institutional climate survey)?  Does the institution need to conduct the additional inclusion review?

Answer: No.  The purpose of the one-in-four-year inclusion review is to ensure that institutions are assessing equitable treatment of student-athletes by gender, race and/or ethnicity, not to prescribe the exact method of the review.

 If an institution choses to conduct the one-in-four-year inclusion review, who should administer it?

Answer: The review should be conducted by a person or entity outside of the institution's athletics department. 

If an institution choses to have campus personnel outside of the athletics department conduct the inclusion review, who on campus should be involved in the analysis and review of inclusion data?

Answer: It is recommended that individuals with responsibilities associated with gender equity and diversity matters, including but not limited to, the institution's Title IX officer, equal employment opportunity officer (EEO) and the chief diversity officer be involved.           

How might an institution set up a process to analyze the environment of inclusiveness in its athletic department?

Answer: An institution may choose to create an inclusion committee on campus responsible for analyzing and reviewing inclusion data. 

If an institution choses to create an inclusion committee to review gender and diversity matters on campus, who should be involved in such a committee?

Answer: An institution may wish to include the following:

  1. Chancellor/president or designee.

  2. Title IX officer.

  3. EEO officer.

  4. Director of athletics.

  5. Senior woman administrator.

  6. Faculty athletics representative.

  7. Student-athlete advisory committee president.

  8. General council. 

Are there other offices on campus involved in the obtaining of data that could be used as resources for an inclusion committee?

Answer: Offices that may be resources for an inclusion committee may include:

  1. Registrar.
  2. Financial aid.
  3. Admissions.
  4. Student affairs.
  5. Inclusion offices/cultural centers.
  6. Student groups.

 

NCAA Division II Institutional Performance Program: Best Practices for Locating Additional Local Data for Assessing Inclusion on Campus

Assumptions regarding inclusion data in the NCAA Division II Institutional Performance Program data management system

  1. The provision of institutional demographics data in the NCAA Division II Institutional Performance Program (IPP) data management system is intended to provide a high-level view of inclusion-related data in the areas of participation rates, sports sponsorship, head and assistant coaches, and athletics department administrative leadership.
  2. The provision of institutional demographics data is not intended as a substitute for the qualitative review of inclusion (i.e., gender equity or diversity) issues within an athletics department.
  3. The institutional demographics data is not intended to be used as an assessment of an athletics department's performance regarding equitable treatment of student-athletes by gender, race and/or ethnicity.
  4. As a best practice, each institution should conduct a qualitative inclusion review once every four years to fully assess its athletics department's performance regarding equitable treatment of student-athletes by gender, race and/or ethnicity.
  5. As a best practice, each institution should collect data to assist in its assessment of its athletics department's performance regarding equitable treatment of student-athletes by gender, race and/or ethnicity.

Documents and information not contained in the data management system

Additional data that should be gathered locally on campus to provide additional information valuable to the evaluation of inclusion.

Treatment of existing teams and student-athletes

  • Policies.
  1. Equipment/clothing/video and supplies.
  2. Travel/per diem/mode/housing.
  3. Housing/dining (do you offer student-athlete housing/training tables/
  4. snacks).
  5. Media/publicity/marketing.
  6. Medical (travel/nontraditional season/facilities/quality of personnel).
  7. Strength and conditioning.
  8. Recruitment.
  9. Coaching (size of staff/ratio of full-time equivalent/student-athlete).
  10. Academic tutors.
  11. Facilities (practice/competitive/locker rooms/meeting rooms).
  12. Scheduling/priority scheduling of practices and competitions.
  13. Support (administration/video/operations).

Participation opportunities

The data management system provides unduplicated count of athletes reported to the NCAA, including those non-NCAA athletes that the institution is counting for participation opportunities (if reported to the NCAA). However, the institution may want to consider the following:

  1. Participation opportunities in non-NCAA sports (if not reported to the NCAA).
  2. Assessment of accommodation of interests and abilities by gender (are students being given the opportunity to participate in athletics as varsity or club sports)?

Financial aid

The data management system measures the percentage of unduplicated male to female athletes compared to percentage of athletic-based scholarship aid provided to male versus female athletes (athletic scholarships). However, there are other aid types that should be considered by the institution.

  1. Summer school aid for entering freshmen (e.g., bridge programs).
  2. Summer school aid for continuing student-athletes.
  3. Aid provided to exhausted eligibility student-athletes.

Equipment and supplies

  1. Quality and sustainability.
  2. Amount and availability.
  3. Maintenance and replacement.

Scheduling of games and practice times

  1. Number of regular-season competitive events per sport.
  2. The time of day competitive opportunities are scheduled.
  3. Number and length of practiced opportunities.
  4. The time of day practice opportunities are scheduled.

Travel and per diem

  1. Modes of transportation.
  2. Housing furnished during travel.
  3. Length of stay prior to and after competition.
  4. Dining arrangement and per diem provided.

Opportunities to receive coaching and assignment, experience, and compensation of coaches

  1. Availability of coaching personnel.
  2. Qualifications and compensation of coaches.

Opportunity to receive tutoring and compensation of tutors

Provision of locker rooms, practice and competitive facilities

  1. Quality and availability of locker rooms, including lockers, showers, restroom facilities.
  2. Practice and competitive facilities.
  3. Quality, availability, and exclusivity of use.
  4. Maintenance and preparation.

Provision of medical and training facilities and services

  1. Insurance.
  2. Availability and quality of training facilities.
  3. Availability of medical personnel.
  4. Availability and quality of athletic trainers.

Provision of weight and strength conditioning

  1. Availability and quality of facilities.
  2. Availability and quality of staff.

Provision of on-campus housing and dining facilities and services

Publicity and marketing

  1. Availability and quality of personnel.
  2. Quantity and quality of publications.
  3. Quantity and quality of other coverage.
  4. Marketing support and materials.

Recruitment

  1. Opportunity to recruit.
  2. Financial and other resources.
  3. Benefits, opportunities and treatment of prospective student-athletes.

Support services

  1. Administrative support (director of athletics/associate director of athletics, etc.).
  2. Office space.
  3. Clerical support.
  4. Office equipment and supplies.

NCAA Division II Institutional Performance Program: Fiscal Management Frequently Asked Questions (Data Analysis)

While there is no “prescribed” path or step-by-step progression to analyze data in the system, the following are some questions to help guide analysis.

Question

Interpretation

Where should I start?

Determine which data point(s) are meaningful to your inquiry.  Determine whether that information changes your thinking and leads you to respond.

What do the numbers mean?

Determine if the data requires action or whether you need more information to determine if action is needed?

How does the information compare to other groups [i.e., Division II; conference; peer group(s)]?

Put the information into the appropriate context.

What else do I need to know? 

Focus on identifying the information that would help you make an informed decision.

Where can I get more information?

Find the information you need to better explain the data and/or make an informed decision (i.e., examining subsequent data points).

Who else needs to be involved in a discussion of this data and what is needed to achieve the desired outcome?

Data may identify a need for further analysis and inclusion of additional campus staff.

Other comments regarding data analysis:

  1. Institutions should look at expense “drivers” to help quickly identify reasons for dramatic increases or decreases in data over a specific period of time.
  2. It’s important to look for “outlier” situations.  Specifically, is the institution moving in correlation with the industry in a given financial indicator?  Why or why not?
  3. Continual question when analyzing data should be:  Do I have the appropriate “peer group” relative to the current discussion?

NCAA Division II Institutional Performance Program: Academics Frequently Asked Questions

What is the purpose of the academics dashboard?

Answer: The academics dashboard provides information regarding current and trending academic data by sport team, gender and ethnicity.  Institutions can use the data to assist them in making informed decisions related to personnel, budget and academic services needed for student-athlete success, and to determine if specific teams and student-athlete groups need more assistance than others.

Who should be involved in reviewing the academics dashboard?

Answer: The institution should determine who should be involved in reviewing the data in the academic dashboard.  It is recommended that institutions include broad-based participation in reviewing all areas of the NCAA Division II Institutional Performance Program (IPP) in order to provide relevant key information to campus leaders and greater transparency. 

Is the academic data already collected by the NCAA or will institutions have to submit additional data?

Answer: All of the academic data is currently collected by the NCAA through the Eligibility Center; Academic Performance Census data; or the NCAA Federal Graduation Rates data.  Institutions will not be required to provide any additional academic data to the NCAA.

How accurate is the data?

Answer: The academics data has been verified by the NCAA research staff prior to being provided to the institution through the IPP.

NCAA Division II Institutional Performance Program: Academics Best Practices

Key points to remember when reviewing academic data

  1. The information obtained through the NCAA Division II Institional Performance Program (IPP) should generally be an affirmation of what you already know about your institution.
  2. The first step in beginning your analysis of data is determining your end-user goal(s).
  3. Some of your analysis may not require you to review all of the data that is provided through the management tool.
  4. Information provided on the first page of the academics data section only provides a general overview of the academic health of your athletics teams.
  5. It is important to remember that data only provides part of the total story and other factors may also contribute to the overall analysis of the data.  Using other available resources will assist you in gathering all of the relevant information necessary to make your decision.
  6. It is recommended that institutions work with their research staff when reporting data to ensure consistency to be mindful of federal reporting guidelines.

Accessing and sharing information

  1. There is a difference between the individuals who are given access to the data, which includes the ability to drill down into specific data points and create comparisons versus individuals with whom information is shared.
  2. Institutions should designate an individual to serve as the lead/point person for accessing data in the IPP management tool.
  3. Institutions should always give access to the following individuals:
  • President and chancellor; director of athletics; and institutional designee.
  1. Institutions should consider giving access to the following individuals/groups:
  • Director of your academic support services for student-athletes, faculty athletics representative/faculty athletics committee chair and senior woman administrator.
  1. As a best practice, institutions may consider sharing information with the following individuals/groups:
  • Institutional key decision and policymakers; senior level and sport administrators; academic support staff; coaching staff members; student-athletes; and conference commissioners.

Data analysis: A broad view

  1. There is no prescribed path for reviewing and analyzing data in the IPP management tool.
  2. For a broad-level view, the best place to start is to look at the home page of the academics data section.  This page will provide you with your institution’s overall academic health as it relates to:
    1. Academic Success Rate.
    2. Federal Graduation Rate.
  3. Next, you can review each of the subsections within the academics data management tool, which include the following:
    1. Initial eligibility.
    2. Progress to degree.
    3. Outcomes.
  4. Use the available comparisons to compare your institution’s data with the data of other groups of institutions.
  5. If there is a particular athletics team for which you would like additional information, use the drill-down menu to select that team and review the academics data.

Data analysis: A more narrow view

  1. There is no prescribed path for reviewing and analyzing data in the IPP management tool.
  2. The following questions and responses will be helpful in determining how best to analyze the data:

Question

Response

Where should I start?

Identify the issue and determine your goal in reviewing and analyzing the data.  After you have determined your goal, determine which data points are meaningful and necessary to respond to your inquiry.

What do the numbers mean?

Once you have reviewed some of the data, determine if the data requires specific action or whether you need more data and/or information to determine what action is needed.

How does our institution compare to other groups?

Put your information into the appropriate context and create appropriate comparison groups.

What else do I need to know?

Identify the additional information you need to better explain the data and/or make an informed decision.  This could include additional data from the online management tool or data that must be obtained from other sources.

Where can I get more information?

If the additional information is not available within the online management tool, work with your institutional research staff and/or the NCAA research staff to obtain additional information. Information obtained through interviews and discussions with relevant staff members may also be needed to reach your goal and determine the appropriate course of action.

Who else should be involved in this discussion?

This could include individuals such as student-athletes, students, academic advisors, faculty, coaches and other athletics and nonathletics administrators.

Academic support services review

  1. Institutions should conduct an annual review of the academic support services they provide to student-athletes.
  2. Academic support services reviewed should include individuals within and outside of the athletics department, as well as student-athletes and members of the academic support staff.

Case study example

The academic performance of several of your institution’s sports teams have been decreasing over the course of the past three years.  You would like to review the academic performance of all of your sports teams to do the following:  (1) identify recruiting issues; (2) make appropriate personnel changes; and (3) appropriately fund your academic support services.

Question

Response

Where should I start?

You identified the issue of declining academic performance. The goal of reviewing the data is to determine the cause(es) of the declining academic performance.

The following data points could be helpful in this determination:

  1. Initial eligibility, including average entrance grade-point averages and test scores.
  2. Progress toward degree, including number of hours enrolled and earned.
  3. Outcomes, including graduation and retention issues.

What do the numbers mean?

While the data may indicate that your institution needs to take immediate action as it relates to the number of student-athletes the institution accepts that are “high risk,” declining grade-point average performance or other academic reasons, it is also good to consider the data in the broader context.

How does our institution compare to other groups?

Put your information into the appropriate context and create appropriate comparison groups.  This type of assessment will be important when your institution is looking to be competitive within their conference.

What else do I need to know?

Identify the additional information you need to better explain the data and/or make an informed decision. This may come from academic support staff, team captains, student-athletes, coaches and sport administrators.

Where can I get more information?

Identify where you can find the additional information. The additional information listed above can be obtained through interviews with these individuals.

Who else should be involved in this discussion?

Once a report and analysis has been completed, the findings should be shared with senior level management as it relates to overall student-athlete success and budgeting. The information should also be shared with your academics support staff, head coaches and sport administrators.

 

NCAA Division II Institutional Performance Program Resources

The goal of the NCAA Institutional Performance Program is to provide institutional leaders with vital and significant data to assist with planning, performance and oversight of their intercollegiate athletics program.

The program guides and supports members with data models, data management and reporting in order to safeguard the health and well-being of student-athletes and promote the integrity of the institution.

Data management system:

Academics:

Student-athlete experience:

  • Coming soon

Students and leadership (inclusion):

Fiscal management:

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