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Home School Students

If you want to play NCAA sports at a Division I or II school, you need to register with the NCAA Eligibility Center if you were home schooled for any part of high school. If you are planning to attend a Division III school, you do not need to register with the NCAA Eligibility Center.

Download the Home School Toolkit for home school students

How to Fill Out Home School Education History

You must complete all the following steps for the NCAA Eligibility Center to certify you as eligible to play NCAA sports:

  • Register with the NCAA Eligibility Center at eligibilitycenter.org.
  • Pay your registration fee.
  • Register to take the ACT or SAT and submit your scores directly to the NCAA with code 9999. Test scores on transcripts or Student Score Reports are not used by the NCAA Eligibility Center.
  • Submit an official transcript for each high school or academic program you attended.
  • Submit proof of high school graduation with a specific graduation date.
  • Submit a signed statement of who managed the home school program (e.g., who taught and evaluated the coursework, awarded grades and issued credit); and a signed statement that home schooling was conducted in accordance with state laws..
  • Submit a written statement describing who taught and evaluated the home school coursework, awarded grades and issued credit.
  • Submit core-course worksheets for English, math, natural or physical science, social science, foreign language, comparative religion or philosophy classes.

Please include the Home School Cover Sheet with your documentation.

Mailing Address:

NCAA Eligibility Center
Attn: Home School Evaluation
1802 Alonzo Watford Sr. Drive
Indianapolis, IN  46202

E-mail address: 

ec-processing@ncaa.org

**The NCAA Eligibility Center strongly encourages all home school documents be submitted via e-mail.  Documents submitted via e-mail will be processed quicker than those sent via regular U.S. mail.**

What is a home school program?

Learning at home is not necessarily the same as being home schooled. Because of recent growth in online and virtual education, a student may be able to learn at home through an online school with online teachers, which would not be considered a parent-directed home school.

Answer the following questions to determine whether your school is a home school or a nontraditional school, which could include courses taken with online teachers, assessments and grading.

  • Who created or developed the curriculum for the courses?
    • If an outside school or program has created the curriculum, it is probably a nontraditional program.
    • If the home school parent or tutor has created the curriculum, it is probably a home school.
  • Who provides the instruction in the courses?
    • If instruction is provided by an outside teacher, it is probably a nontraditional program.
    • If instruction is provided by a parent or tutor in the home, it is probably a home school.
  • Who designed or created the assignments and assessments?
    • If assignments and assessments are created by an outside school or program, it is probably a nontraditional course.
    • If assignments and assessments are created by a parent or tutor, it is probably a home school.
  • Who evaluates or grades the assignments and assessments?
    • If assignments and assessments are graded by an outside school or program, it is probably a nontraditional course.
    • If assignments and assessments are graded by a parent or tutor, it is probably a home school.
  • Who determines what score or grade is achieved in the courses?
    • If an outside school or program determines the grade the student earns, it is probably a nontraditional course.
    • If a parent or tutor decides what grade the student earns, it is probably a home school.
  • Who is responsible for producing a student transcript or grade report?
    • If a transcript or grade report is produced by an outside school or program, it is probably a nontraditional course.
    • If a transcript or grade report is produced by the parent, tutor or home school program, It is probably a home school.

If the answers to the questions above have suggested that the courses were taken through nontraditional means (such as an online or virtual school), your courses through that school would be evaluated under the NCAA nontraditional course legislation.

Courses that will be evaluated as home school courses are those in which a parent or tutor:

  • Plans and delivers actual instructional activities such as lectures, discussions, tutorials, feedback or assistance.
  • Determines the student’s comprehension of the material by grading and evaluating student performance and achievement on assignments and assessments and providing appropriate re-teaching and feedback.
  • Determines the overall grade the student achieved in the course.
  • Places the grade on a transcript or grade report or reports the grade to a transcription agency.

Home school core courses

A core course prepares you for four-year college classes in the subject areas of English, math (Algebra 1 or higher), natural or physical science, social science, foreign language, comparative religion or philosophy.

All core courses must show units of credit or semester or annual grades on your home school transcript. Course credits will be acceptable in the following increments: .25, .50, .75, 1.0 or .34, .67, or 1.02. No course may exceed 1.02 units of credit.

If you take a college class while you are a home school student, you must receive both a grade and credit in the class for it to be used as a core course. Audited or CLEP classes are not considered NCAA core courses. To use a college class to meet your core-course requirements, the home school transcript must designate the course as a dual enrollment course, include the school at which the course was completed and award grade and credit for the completed course.

High school classes taken during the eighth grade may be used as NCAA core courses as long as they meet core-course requirements and are shown on the home school transcript with a grade and credit.

Division I schools require college-bound student-athletes to complete their core courses in eight semesters after starting ninth grade. If a student does not graduate in eight semesters because he or she was reassigned to a grade in high school after completing that grade at home, courses completed after eight semesters cannot be used to certify that student’s eligibility to play at a Division I school.

Home school graduation

Acceptable proofs of graduation include the following:

  • Diploma showing month, day and year of graduation.
  • Home school transcript showing month, day and year of graduation.
  • GED test results and diploma.

The NCAA Eligibility Center cannot accept proof of graduation from a diploma issued by a home school in New York or Hawaii because those states do not recognize home school diplomas. If a student is home schooled in New York or Hawaii and does not graduate from a high school, the student must provide a GED certificate, district high school diploma, or state department of education diploma in order to meet the NCAA's graduation requirements.

A GED cannot be used by the NCAA Eligibility Center if it was taken before the date a student would normally have graduated with his or her class.

Home school transcripts

A home school transcript must include course titles and grades, units of credit for courses, grading scale with letter grades and the signature of the home school administrator (the parent or person who organized, taught and evaluated the home school coursework).

Grades from one high school or program transcribed on another high school’s transcript will not be accepted. If a student was home schooled and attended a public or private high school, he or she must submit both a home school transcript with supporting documentation and a transcript sent from the public or private high school.

If you took home school courses through an established nontraditional program – such as an online, correspondence or tutoring program – which evaluated your coursework and issued a transcript, the program must submit your transcript to the NCAA Eligibility Center along with the program’s contact information.