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Resocialization of Collegiate Sport: Checklist

Below is a checklist that was created in consultation with the NCAA COVID-19 Advisory Panel; the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine COVID-19 Working Group; and the Autonomy 5 Medical Advisory Group to support efforts by athletics administrators and other institutional personnel responsible for evaluating and implementing policies and procedures around the resocialization of collegiate sport. The content of the checklist is reflective of the information provided in the following three NCAA resocialization publications released to date: Core Principles of Resocialization of Collegiate Sport; Resocialization of Collegiate Sport: Action Plan Considerations; and Resocialization of Collegiate Sport: Developing Standards for Practice and Competition. As the NCAA resocialization publications were offered as guidance for membership and not intended as mandated requirements, this checklist is not intended and should not be interpreted as a clinical practice guideline or legal standard of care. Rather, like the NCAA resocialization publications, this checklist is offered as a guide and, as such, is of a general nature, intended to be considered and applied as deemed appropriate by the school and its athletics department in consultation with relevant medical and administrative leadership personnel and in a manner consistent with applicable federal, state, local and institutional guidance and requirements. 

Education

There is a plan to share, on an ongoing basis, relevant information from and updates to the NCAA resocialization documents and other related governmental and institutional policies and materials with the following audiences:

Before interacting with student-athletes and resuming material responsibilities on campus, staff from each of the above-named departments participate in meetings or other opportunities designed to educate them about the following topics and their professional responsibilities:

Mitigating Risk

Daily Self-Health Checks

Face Coverings and Physical Distancing

Outdoor Training

Practice Considerations

Team Travel

Student-Athlete Return to Campus

Transition Periods and Return to Activity

COVID-19 Infection Managment

Time- based strategy

For individuals who test positive but never develop symptoms, isolation and other precautions can be discontinued 10 days after the date of their first positive PCR test for SARS-CoV-2.

Time-based strategy

For most people with COVID-19 illness, isolation and precautions can generally be discontinued 10 days after symptom onset and at least 24 hours after resolution of fever, without the use of fever-reducing medications, and with improvement of other symptoms.

Return to Activity After Infection

Sport Classification and Testing Strategies

Low contact risk: bowling, diving, equestrian, fencing, golf, rifle, skiing, swimming, tennis, track and field.

Intermediate contact risk: acrobatics and tumbling, baseball, beach volleyball, cross country*, gymnastics, softball, triathlon*.

High contact risk: basketball, field hockey, football, ice hockey, lacrosse, rowing, rugby, soccer, squash, volleyball, water polo, wrestling.

*The level of risk in cross country, track and field and triathlon are dependent upon the student-athlete’s proximity to other unmasked individuals. For example, the start or finish of a race may involve a group of athletes who are breathing heavily in a group space with a breakdown in physical distancing.

Considerations for Low Contact Risk Sports:

  • Diagnostic testing upon arrival to campus.
  • During summer athletic activities and out-of-season athletic activities: surveillance testing in conjunction with a university plan for all students, plus additional testing for symptomatic and high contact risk individuals.
  • During in-season (preseason, regular season, postseason): symptomatic testing and high contact risk testing thereafter.

Considerations for Intermediate Contact Risk Sports:

  • Diagnostic testing upon arrival to campus.
  • During summer athletic activities and out-of-season athletic activities, and in-season (preseason, regular season and postseason): surveillance PCR testing, for example, 25%-50% of athletes and “inner bubble” personnel every two weeks if physical distancing, masking and other protective features are not maintained, plus additional testing for symptomatic and high contact risk individuals.
  • Symptomatic testing and high contact risk testing as appropriate.

Considerations for High Contact Risk Sports:

  • Diagnostic testing upon arrival to campus.
  • During summer athletic activities and out-of-season athletic activities: surveillance PCR testing, for example, 25%-50% of athletes and “inner bubble” personnel every two weeks if physical distancing, masking and other protective features are not maintained, plus additional testing for symptomatic and high contact risk individuals.
  • During in-season (preseason, regular season and postseason): weekly PCR testing of all athletes, plus “inner bubble” personnel for whom physical distancing, masking and other protective features are not maintained.
  • Additional testing for symptomatic and high contact risk individuals.

  • Before campus departure and within 72 hours/three days of competition for football and within 72 hours/three days of the first of the week’s set of games for other high-risk sports.

  • Lack of ability to isolate new positive cases or to quarantine high contact risk cases on campus.
  • Unavailability or inability to perform symptomatic, surveillance or pre-competition testing when warranted.
  • Campuswide or local community test rates that are considered unsafe by local public health officials.
  • Inability to perform adequate contact tracing consistent with governmental requirements or recommendations.
  • Local public health officials stating that there is an inability for the hospital infrastructure to accommodate a surge in COVID-19-related hospitalizations.