Overuse Injuries and Periodization

College athletes are often assumed to be some of the healthiest members of society, yet participation in years of competitive sports can expose them to overuse or overtraining injuries. The NCAA takes progressive steps to work with youth advocates, parents, clinicians, coaches and national sport governing bodies to modify safety guidelines, playing rules and equipment standards to minimize those risks and provide student-athletes with the best opportunity to enjoy a healthy career.

The NCAA supports the American Development Model and a safe continuum of health throughout the lifespan of a student-athlete. The ADM is the United States Olympic Committee’s official rollout of long-term development, and all Olympic sports are signatories to this plan. ADM includes multisport participation and cautioning against early sport specialization.  The NCAA constantly monitors safety guidelines, playing rules and protective equipment standards to minimize risks and provide student-athletes with a safe competitive environment and the best opportunity to enjoy a healthy career.

In conjunction with the national leadership of all national governing bodies of NCAA sports and strategic NCAA stakeholders, the SSI’s strategic agenda includes hosting sport-specific summits for all NCAA sports that address overuse injuries and periodization, while considering the path from youth sport to college sport to sport for life.

Educational Resources

The NCAA Sport Science Institute is a leader in providing health and safety resources to college athletes, coaches, athletics administrators and campus partners.

Learn More >
Data and Research

Collecting and analyzing data, and then using those data to make informed decisions, is central to what we do at the Sport Science Institute.

Learn More >
Summits and Task Forces

The SSI collaborates with prominent medical and sports medicine organizations, leading experts in the field, and member schools to host sport and topic-specific summits and task forces each year.

Learn More >