You are here

Weber State math instructor assists with academic dishonesty

Download the Weber State University Infractions Decision (PDF)

Listen to the Press Conference

A Weber State University math instructor violated NCAA ethical conduct rules when she completed coursework for five football student-athletes, according to a decision issued by a Division I Committee on Infractions panel. During the investigation, student-athletes said they received hints about the proper approach, formulas or help with quiz and test answers. Although alleged by enforcement staff, the panel determined the school did not fail to monitor the academic coursework of student-athletes because the compliance system detected the violations and the school quickly took action.

Penalties include three years of probation; scholarship reductions for the football team, more than $5,000 in fines and a five-year show-cause order for the math instructor. During that period, if the instructor works for a member school and has responsibilities in its athletics department, the school must appear before a committee panel.

The math instructor admitted that during the spring 2013 semester five student-athletes gave her their usernames and passwords. She then used that information to log in to their online math courses to complete tests, quizzes and exams. At the conclusion of the semester, adjunct instructor in one of the math classes noticed a student-athlete completed six quizzes and a final exam in less than one hour – an uncharacteristic pattern for that student. That concern led to a full review of the developmental math program, and the discovery that the instructor provided assistance to other student-athletes. Weber State charged the five student-athletes with academic dishonesty and issued them failing grades for the course.

Penalties and corrective measures include:

  • Public reprimand and censure.
  • Three years of probation from November 19, 2014 through November 18, 2017.
  •  A fine of $5,000 plus two percent of the school’s football program operating budget.
  • A reduction of 9 football equivalency scholarships.
  • A five-year show-cause order for the math instructor. During that period, if the instructor works for a member school and has responsibilities in its athletics department, the school must appear before a committee panel. The public report contains additional details.

Members of the Committee on Infractions are drawn from NCAA membership and members of the public. The members of the panel who reviewed this case are Carol Cartwright, president emeritus at Kent State University; Thomas Hill, senior vice president for student affairs at Iowa State University; Roscoe Howard, Jr., attorney; Greg Sankey, executive associate commissioner and chief operating officer for the Southeastern Conference; Sankar Suryanarayan, university counsel, Princeton University; and Rodney Uphoff, chief hearing officer and law professor at the University of Missouri, Columbia.