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Committee on Infractions

Expanded committee to increase diversity, efficiency

As of August 1, 2013 the new infractions structure increased the Division I Committee on Infractions from 10 to as many as 24 voting members to improve diversity of experiences and backgrounds of its members. Smaller panels will be assembled to review cases more quickly and efficiently. By expanding the Committee on Infractions and creating multiple panels from that “pool,” the committee can hear cases more frequently.

“Increasing the Division I Committee on Infractions allows us greater diversity in backgrounds and experiences while increasing the flexibility of the committee,” said Britton Banowsky, Division I Committee on Infractions chair and Conference USA commissioner. “These changes will allow cases to be heard more quickly and efficiently with fewer burdens on the individual committee members.”

In addition, the entire Committee on Infractions is required to meet at least twice annually (at least once in person) to review cases across panels and check for consistency in terms of the way the guidelines are applied.

Members of the Division I Committee on Infractions are drawn from the NCAA membership and the independent public. Members serve three-year terms and can be reappointed for a maximum of three terms.

Internal operating procedures

As part of the infractions process reforms, the Division I Committee on Infractions has established new operating procedures that provide committee members and the NCAA membership with a roadmap for how it hears and decides cases.

The Committee on Infractions’ new , which are authorized by NCAA rules and approved by the Division I Board of Directors, are intended to formalize its process and help member schools understand how cases move through the infractions process. They will also ensure that decisions are made in ways that are consistent and conforms to a process that is fully explained to member schools and individuals involved.

That guide provides the committee a formal, yet flexible, process for hearing cases and allows it to be more responsive to procedural issues that arise during the infractions process. 

Current members

John S. Black, Polsinelli Shughart – A Kansas City-based attorney who holds degrees from Duke and Colorado College, Black has assisted sports-related nonprofit organizations implement governance, rights protection and risk minimization processes. His term expires in September 2014, and he is eligible for reappointment.

Roscoe Howard, Andrews Kurth LLP – A Washington, D.C.-based attorney, Howard focuses his practice on white-collar criminal matters, corporate compliance and ethics issues and other litigation. Howard, a former U.S. Attorney, holds degrees from Virginia and Brown. His term expires in September 2015, and he is eligible for reappointment.

Gregory Sankey, SEC – Associate commissioner of the Southeastern Conference, Sankey handles all compliance matters for the league. A former commissioner of the Southland Conference, Sankey holds degrees from Cortland State and Syracuse. Sankey’s term expires in September 2016, and he is eligible for reappointment.

Britton Banowsky, Conference-USA – Commissioner of Conference-USA, Banowsky holds a law degree and business degree from Oklahoma and is the Committee's chair. Before joining Conference-USA, he was general counsel for the Big 12 and commissioner of the Southland Conference. Banowsky’s term expires in September 2014 and he is eligible for reappointment.

Melissa L. Conboy, Notre Dame – Senior deputy athletics director at Notre Dame, Conboy oversees facilities, legal affairs and human resources for the school. Conboy also served as an NCAA enforcement representative from 1985 to 1987. She holds degrees from Kansas and Notre Dame. Conboy’s term expires in September 2014, and she is eligible for reappointment.

James O’Fallon, Oregon – A law professor and faculty athletics representative at Oregon, O’Fallon’s scholarly work focuses on constitutional history and theory and legal philosophy, including environmental law . He also taught at Richmond and Detroit and was a fellow at Harvard. O’Fallon’s term expires in September 2015, and he is eligible for reappointment.

Rodney Uphoff, Missouri – A law professor and former criminal defense lawyer and public defender, Uphoff holds undergraduate and law degrees from Wisconsin and a master’s degree from the London School of Economics. He serves as Missouri’s associate dean of academic affairs and defended Oklahoma City federal building bomber Terry Nichols. His term expires in September 2015, and he is eligible for reappointment

Greg Christopher, Bowling Green – Athletics director at Bowling Green of the Mid-America Conference, Christopher has a communications background. A former communications marketing analyst and one-time executive director of the Society of Professional Journalists, Christopher was named athletics director at Bowling Green in 2006. His term expires in 2015, and he is eligible for reappointment.

Eleanor W. Myers, Temple – A law professor and faculty athletics representative, Myers holds undergraduate and law degrees from Penn. She specializes in professional responsibility and business. She was a securities and antitrust attorney while in private practice. Her term expires in September 2015, and she is eligible for reappointment.

Christopher Griffin, Foley & Lardner – A Tampa-based attorney, Griffin conducts a broad practice in commercial litigation. Griffin earned both his B.A. and J.D. from Florida State University. His term expires in September 2014, and he is eligible for reappointment.

Appointment begins August 1, 2013

Michael Adams, Georgia – Adams served as president of Georgia from 1997 until 2013. He served in administrative roles at Pepperdine and as president at Centre College after teaching at Ohio State. He holds degrees from Lipscomb and Ohio State. His term expires in September 2014, and he is eligible for reappointment.

Norman Bay, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission – Bay is director of enforcement at the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. A former law professor at New Mexico, Bay also served as U.S. Attorney in New Mexico. He is a former advisor at the State Department as well. He holds degrees from Dartmouth and Harvard. His term expires in September 2014, and he is eligible for reappointment.

Lloyd Carr, Michigan – Carr spent 28 years on the football coaching staff at Michigan, the last 13 as head coach. He was an assistant at Eastern Michigan and Illinois before he moved to Michigan. He holds degrees from Missouri and Northern Michigan. His term expires in September 2014 and he is eligible for reappointment.

Carol Cartwright – Cartwright served as president at both Bowling Green State and Kent State, serving on numerous national boards. She held administrative roles at Penn State and UC Davis. She holds degrees from Pittsburgh and Wisconsin-Whitewater. Her term expires in September 2016 and she is eligible for reappointment.

Bobby Cremins – A former head basketball coach at College of Charleston, Appalachian State and Georgia Tech, Cremins retired in 2012. He received degrees from South Carolina. His term expires in September 2016 and he is eligible for reappointment.

Thomas Hill, Iowa State – Hill became senior vice president for student affairs at Iowa State in June 2012, after joining the campus in 1997. He also held administrative positions at Florida, Tulane and Oklahoma. He holds degrees from Florida, C.W. Post – Long Island and Arkansas State. His term expires in September 2015, and he is eligible for reappointment.

Joel Maturi, Minnesota – After 10 years as athletics director at Minnesota, Maturi now serves as an assistant to the president. He served in administrative posts at Denver, Wisconsin and Miami before he moved to Minnesota. He graduated from Notre Dame. His term expires in September 2016, and he is eligible for reappointment.

Sankar Suryanaryan, Princeton – Suryanaryan joined the general counsel’s office at Princeton in 2001. He held a similar position at American University and was a litigation associate with Chadbourne & Parke. He holds degrees from Penn and Georgetown. His term expires in September 2016, and he is eligible for reappointment.

Frequently Asked Questions

No, the Committee on Infractions is an independent body that decides if NCAA rules have been broken and what the appropriate penalties should be. Each case is reviewed by a panel of committee members to find the facts of the case. After a hearing with members from the school, other involved individuals and the NCAA enforcement staff, the committee concludes whether violations occurred and prescribes penalties.

There are many aggravating and mitigating factors that can impact how the committee imposes penalties. For example, multiple Level I violations, lack of institutional control, unethical conduct or other factors could result in tougher penalties. The committee could consider self-reporting of violations, cooperation during the investigation, meaningful corrective measures and other factors actions that could lessen the prescribed penalties.

 

Overview

New violation structure
Accountability and penalties
Committee on Infractions
Infractions Appeals Committee