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2004 NCAA Woman of the Year

Kelly Albin, University of California, Davis

 

Albin Named 2004 NCAA Woman of the Year

For Immediate Release: Sunday, October 31, 2004
Contact: Jennifer Kearns, Associate Director of Public and Media Relations

Kelly Albin, 2004 NCAA Woman of the Year

INDIANAPOLIS---Kelly Albin, a former lacrosse standout at University of California, Davis, is the 2004 NCAA Woman of the Year.

Albin received the award - one of the most prestigious that the NCAA bestows - at the 14th annual NCAA Woman of the Year Awards Dinner tonight (October 31) at the Westin Indianapolis. The award honors academic and athletics excellence, as well as community service and leadership.

Albin was chosen from 276 nominations. A selection committee composed of representatives from member schools chose 52 winners representing the states, District of Columbia and Puerto Rico, and then narrowed the field to 10 national finalists. The NCAA Committee on Women's Athletics selected Albin from among the 10 finalists.

The Fort Bragg, California, native is the third student-athlete from University of California - Davis, to be named NCAA Woman of the Year. Albin is also the second lacrosse athlete to win the award.

An outstanding scholar, Albin graduated magna cum laude in March with a 3.952 grade-point average (on a 4.0 scale) in food science with a microbiology emphasis. A recipient of the NCAA Postgraduate Scholarship, Albin was named to the CoSIDA Academic all-American Team, Intercollegiate Women's Lacrosse Coaches Association (IWLCA) Academic all-American Team and was the IWLCA Division II Scholar Athlete of the Year. She also received the UC Davis Outstanding Senior Leadership Award in 2004 and was consistently on the Dean's List and Intercollegiate Athletics Honor Roll throughout her college career.

Albin, who was ranked twelfth in NCAA Division II assists per game (1.71) in 2004, ranked nineteenth in NCAA Division II in points per game (4.24) in 2004; Third in conference points per game (4.40) in 2004 and set 18 UC Davis school records/top six all-time rankings. She broke six school records (shots in game, career assists, season assists, assists in a game, career ground balls, career turnovers). Her team finished the season ranked No. 2 in the final Inside Lacrosse Division II Power Poll.

Albin, the daughter of Doug and Tess Albin, spent much of her spare time volunteering for various organizations and events. She was a ProPERU volunteer in Urubamba, Peru, in 2003, where she spent 12 weeks teaching physical education; building clean-burning stoves in adobe houses; installing septic systems and flush toilets in a preschool; and planted 1,000 saplings on a reforestation site.

In addition, she volunteered for Shriner's Hospital; served as a tutor in the athletic study hall; took notes for a student with disabilities; served as a microbiology lab assistant; and participated in Student-Athlete Advisory Council Holiday Drives and a Christmas Flute Ensemble.

"As an athlete, I learned to speak the universal language of sports," Albin said in her personal statement on her nomination form. "When I spent three months in Peru last year as a full-time international volunteer, I used sports to connect with children in a way that transcended words. I am no longer a college athlete. But being an athlete has - and always will be - a part of who I am."

Last year's Woman of the Year was Ashley Jo Rowatt, a student-athlete from Kenyon College, a Division III school in Gambier, Ohio, who competed in swimming and diving and graduated with a degree in molecular biology.

 

2004 NCAA Woman of the Year Finalists Announced

For Immediate Release: Friday, September 17, 2004
Contact: Jennifer Kearns, Associate Director of Public and Media Relations

INDIANAPOLIS -The NCAA announced today the 10 finalists for the 2004 NCAA Woman of the Year award, one of the most prestigious honors the NCAA bestows.

This award recognizes young women in intercollegiate athletics for their outstanding achievements in athletics, academics and community service.

This year’s finalists, who have an average grade-point average of 3.81 on a 4.0 scale, graduated or will graduate with degrees in majors such as biology, chemistry, food science, kinesiology, math, pre-medicine and Spanish.

The 10 finalists for the 2004 NCAA Woman of the Year award include six NCAA Postgraduate Scholarship recipients, and seven of the 10 are or were involved with the NCAA Student-Athlete Advisory Committees (SAAC) on their campuses and in their conferences. SAAC is a committee made up of student-athlete leaders assembled to provide insight on the student-athlete experience. The SAAC also offers input on the rules, regulations and policies that affect student-athletes’ lives on NCAA member institution campuses and it is the “student voice” in the NCAA’s governance structure.

The finalists are volunteers who served as peer counselors, "adopted" a family at Christmas, volunteered for a food bank, worked with the Special Olympics and participated in a missions trip to Peru.

Of the finalists, six are from Division I member institutions, two are from Division II and two are from Division III. They represent a variety of sports, including lacrosse, swimming, indoor and outdoor track, cross country and soccer, from schools in California, Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Michigan, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon and Virginia.

The 10 finalists are:

  • Kelly Albin, California, University of California, Davis, lacrosse. Hometown: Fort Bragg, California.
  • Julie Hardt, Georgia, University of Georgia, swimming. Hometown: Reno, Nevada.
  • Abbey Elsberry, Idaho, Boise State University, indoor and outdoor track. Hometown: Billings, Montana.
  • Megan Grunert, Indiana, University of Indianapolis, swimming. Hometown: Menomonee Falls, Wisconsin.
  • Sherita Williams, Michigan, Michigan State University, indoor and outdoor track. Hometown: Tampa, Florida.
  • Kinsey Coles, North Dakota, North Dakota State University, cross country, indoor and outdoor track. Hometown: Hillsboro, North Dakota.
  • Kayla Heising, Ohio, College of Wooster, swimming. Hometown: Wauseon, Ohio.
  • Shana Robinson, Oklahoma, University of Tulsa, indoor and outdoor track. Hometown: Tulsa, Oklahoma.
  • Imani Dorsey, Oregon, University of Portland, soccer. Hometown: Santa Monica, California.
  • Melissa Block, Virginia, Mary Washington College, lacrosse. Hometown: Annapolis, Maryland.

This is the 14th year the Woman of the Year award has been given.

The finalists were selected from 276 entries by a committee comprised of athletics administrators from NCAA member colleges and universities. The NCAA Committee on Women’s Athletics will select the 2004 NCAA Woman of the Year from among the 10 finalists. The national winner will be announced at an awards dinner October 31, in Indianapolis.

Last year’s national winner was Ashley Rowatt, a swimming and diving standout from Kenyon College, a Division III school in Gambier, Ohio. She was the first student-athlete in Division III to win the award.

Other past winners include: 2002 - Tanisha Silas, track and field, University of California, Davis; 2001 - Kimberly A. Black, Olympic gold medal swimmer, University of Georgia; 2000 - Kristy Kowal, Olympic silver medal swimmer, University of Georgia; 1999 - Jamila Demby, track and field, University of California, Davis; 1998 - Peggy Boutilier, lacrosse and field hockey, University of Virginia; 1997 - the late Lisa Ann Coole, swimming, University of Georgia; 1996 - Billie Winsett Fletcher, volleyball, University of Nebraska, Lincoln; 1995 - Rebecca Lobo, basketball, University of Connecticut; 1994 - Tanya Hughes Jones, track and field, University of Arizona; 1993 - Nnenna Jean Lynch, cross country and track and field, Villanova University; 1992 - Catherine Byrne Maloney, swimming, University of Tennessee, Knoxville; and 1991 - Mary Beth Riley-Metcalf, cross country, Canisius College.

 

State winners announced for Woman of the Year Award

September 13, 2004

The selection process for the 14th annual NCAA Woman of the Year Award has begun with the announcement of 52 state winners (including Washington, D.C., and Puerto Rico).

The NCAA Woman of the Year Award honors standout female student-athletes who have achieved excellence in academics, athletics and community leadership.

The 2004 state winners represent 12 sports. Thirty winners are from Division I schools, and 11 each are from Divisions II and III.

Each NCAA member institution was invited to nominate one student-athlete. For the fifth straight year, schools that submitted an ethnic minority candidate also were allowed to submit a second nominee. Twenty-six schools, the same number as in 2003, took advantage of the opportunity to do so.

The total number of applications, however, dropped from 338 in 2003 to 276 this year. Division I submitted 138 nominations, Division II submitted 42 and Division III submitted 96. It was the first year since 1998 that the total number of nominations fell below 300.

A committee composed of representatives from member institutions chose the state honorees. That same committee will chose 10 finalists from among the 52 state winners. Selection criteria include grade-point average, athletics accomplishments and community service.

The 10 finalists will be announced in the September 27 issue of The NCAA News.

The NCAA Committee on Women's Athletics will choose a national winner from among the 10 finalists. The national honoree will be announced during the 2004 NCAA Woman of the Year dinner October 31 in Indianapolis.

Dot Richardson, a former U.S. Olympic gold medal winner in softball, and Sheri Coale, head women's basketball coach at the University of Oklahoma, will emcee the 14th annual event.

As part of the NCAA Woman of the Year weekend activities, the 2004 honorees will visit Indianapolis-area middle schools to speak with children about their experiences as student-athletes and about balancing academics and athletics.

Ashley Jo Rowatt, a former swimming student-athlete at Kenyon College, was named as the 2003 Woman of the Year. Rowatt was the first Division III student-athlete to win the award.

State Winner School Sport(s)
Alabama Stephanie Kite University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa Gymnastics
Alaska Sigrid Aas University of Alaska Fairbanks Cross Country, Skiing
Arizona Nicole Gurnicz University of Arizona Outdoor Track and Field, Cross Country
Arkansas Jessica Johnson University of Arkansas, Fayetteville Indoor and Outdoor Track and Field
California Kelly Albin University of California, Davis Lacrosse
Colorado Rebekah Walter Adams State College Indoor and Outdoor Track and Field, Cross Country
Connecticut Brittany Allen Wesleyan University (Connecticut) Cross Country, Indoor and Outdoor Track and Field
Delaware Tyechia Smith University of Delaware Indoor and Outdoor Track and Field
District of Columbia Karla Kucerkova American University Volleyball
Florida Sara McLarty University of Florida Swimming and Diving
Georgia Julie Hardt University of Georgia Swimming and Diving
Hawaii Lily Kahumoku University of Hawaii, Manoa Volleyball
Idaho Abbey Elsberry Boise State University Indoor and Outdoor Track and Field
Illinois Sarah Martz DePaul University Softball
Indiana Megan Grunert University of Indianapolis Swimming and Diving
Iowa Raegan Schultz Central College (Iowa) Indoor and Outdoor Track and Field, Volleyball
Kansas Nicole Ohlde Kansas State University Basketball
Kentucky Cherelle Lampkins Morehead State University Volleyball
Louisiana Kristin Schmidt Louisiana State University Softball
Maine Elizabeth Wanless Bates College Volleyball, Indoor and Outdoor Track and Field
Maryland Courtney Davidson U.S. Naval Academy Basketball
Massachusetts Anna Crary Smith College Rowing
Michigan Sherita Williams Michigan State University Indoor and Outdoor Track and Field
Minnesota Cassie Busse University of Minnesota, Twin Cities Volleyball
Mississippi Kathryn Jaspers Mississippi State University Softball
Missouri Kathryn Hamera University of Missouri, Rolla Cross Country, Indoor and Outdoor Track and Field
Montana Brooklynn Lorenzen University of Montana Basketball
Nebraska Stephanie Kirby University of Nebraska at Omaha Soccer
Nevada Bridget Byrne University of Nevada, Las Vegas Softball
New Hampshire Lana Smith Dartmouth College Lacrosse
New Jersey Julie Culley Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick Cross Country, Indoor and Outdoor Track and Field
New Mexico Jennifer Delich University of New Mexico Skiing
New York Amanda Laytham Ithaca College Cross Country, Indoor and Outdoor Track and Field
North Carolina Heather Davis Winston-Salem State University Softball
North Dakota Kinsey Coles North Dakota State University Indoor and Outdoor Track and Field, Cross Country
Ohio Kayla Heising College of Wooster Swimming and Diving
Oklahoma Shana Robinson University of Tulsa Indoor and Outdoor Track and Field
Oregon Imani Dorsey University of Portland Soccer
Pennsylvania Joanna Lohman Pennsylvania State University Soccer
Puerto Rico Ana C. Ramirez Marquez University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras Volleyball, Outdoor Track and Field
Rhode Island Karen Prazar Brown University Rowing
South Carolina Anna Vagstad Winthrop University Volleyball
South Dakota Brianne Edwards University of South Dakota Outdoor Track and Field
Tennessee Kristin Peck Lipscomb University Softball, Volleyball
Texas Melanie Carter Abilene Christian University Basketball
Utah Erin Cartwright-Davis Utah State University Volleyball
Vermont Rebecca Brakeley Middlebury College Lacrosse, Field Hockey
Virginia Melissa Block Mary Washington College Lacrosse
Washington Hailey Noble University of Puget Sound Rowing
West Virginia Carmen Blissit Wheeling Jesuit University Cross Country, Outdoor Track and Field, Rowing
Wisconsin Kay Mikolajczak University of Wisconsin, Oshkosh Outdoor Track and Field, Basketball
Wyoming Kimama Wells University of Wyoming Indoor and Outdoor Track and Field