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Division II Timeline

1973

August: At a Special Convention, the NCAA membership votes to reorganize from its previous university/college division structure into Divisions I, II and III.

November: The first Division II championship is conducted in cross country at Wheaton College (Illinois).

1980

January: Division II women’s championships are established in basketball, field hockey, swimming and diving, tennis, and volleyball.

1997

January: Convention delegates approve a federated structure in which Divisions II and III retain their one-institution, one-vote approach, and implement governance structures that clearly put university presidents in charge of policymaking.

August: The first Division II Student-Athlete Summit is held in Denver to involve student-athletes more in governance.

1998

Summer: The Division II Strategic Plan is developed.

August: The Division II Presidents Council commits $250,000 in funding for the 1999-00 fiscal year to a matching grant program designed to aid Division II conferences and institutions working to enhance gender and ethnic-minority diversity.

2000

June: The Division II Championships Committee addresses major issues involving championships enhancements and gender equity. Participation at the time favored men by 55 to 45 percent. The committee recommends increased bracket and travel-party sizes in certain sports to achieve more balanced participation by 2001-02.

2001

Fall: The Division II Degree-Completion Award Program is created to provide deserving student-athletes financial assistance for them to complete their first baccalaureate degree.

2002

Fall: Division II institutions participate in a Graduation Success Report pilot program, paving the way for use of the Academic Success Rate in Division II.

2004

May: The first Division II Championships Festival is held in Orlando, Florida, and features national championships in men’s and women’s golf, men’s and women’s tennis, softball, and women’s lacrosse. The concept of a sports festival − an Olympic-style event in which multiple champions are crowned and student-athletes from different sports interact with one another − is unique to Division II.

Spring: The Division II Student-Athlete Advisory Committee establishes its partnership with the Make-A-Wish Foundation.

2005

January: The Division II membership adopts legislation
that requires all institutions to submit Academic Success
Rate data annually.

June: The first Division II Chancellors and Presidents
Summit is conducted, at which the Division II Presidents Council shares the results of a study on reclassification to Division I.

September: Division II provides the lead gift of $1 million as the NCAA establishes its “Home Team” initiative to provide relief to the New Orleans community in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina.

2006

January: Division II adopts a structure that penalizes institutions that use ineligible student-athletes during intercollegiate competition. This “nullification system” is a penalty assessed during the championships selection process.

Summer: Division II signs a three-year agreement with College Sports Television Network to televise and broadband stream selected football and men’s and women’s basketball games. Television coverage begins in the fall with three televised football games and 40 games online.

August: The Division II Presidents Council approves a Division II strategic-positioning platform that clearly articulates the strategic position and key attributes of Division II.

November: Division II conducts its second National Championships Festival (and first fall sports festival) in Pensacola, Florida. Championships are conducted in men’s and women’s cross country, field hockey, men’s and women’s soccer, and volleyball.

2007

April: The Division II Management Council sponsors a proposal to increase the number of core courses required for initial eligibility from 14 to 16.

June: The second Division II Chancellors and Presidents Summit includes a focus on the benefits of Division II membership classification.

2008

January: Division II adopts legislation that requires institutions to submit Academic Performance Census data annually and establishes a penalty structure for failure to do so.

May: Houston hosts the third Division II National Championship Festival, this one for spring championships.

July: Division II approves a membership pilot program to begin accepting international members. The Canadian institution Simon Fraser University enters the membership process shortly thereafter.

2009

March: Houston hosts its second Division II National Championships Festival – the first featuring winter sports competition. Champions are crowned in men’s and women’s swimming and diving, men’s and women’s indoor track and field, and wrestling.

December: The Division II Financial Dashboard Tool is piloted in 2009 and launched at the June 2010 Division II Chancellors and Presidents Summit.

2010

January: The Division II membership passes Phase One of its landmark “Life in the Balance” legislative package aimed at aligning playing and practice seasons with the Division II strategic-positioning platform.

June: The third Division II Chancellors and Presidents Summit is conducted in Indianapolis. Discussions focus on measuring the success of the “Life in the Balance” initiative; planning for the long-range financial stability of the division; managing membership growth; and promoting best practices at Division II historically black colleges and universities and Hispanic-serving institutions.

July: The Division II Membership Committee approves a new set of minimum requirements for institutions seeking Division II membership.

September: The latest Academic Success Rate data are released, showing a 71 percent graduation rate for Division II student-athletes.

November-December: The fifth Division II National Championships Festival is held in Louisville, Kentucky. The four-day event crowns champions in men’s and women’s cross country, men’s and women’s soccer, women’s volleyball, and field hockey.

2011

January: At the 2011 NCAA Convention in San Antonio, the Division II membership passes Phase Two of the “Life the Balance” initiative, approving three Bylaw 17 changes.

April: The Division II Long-Range Projections Task Force concludes a strategic budget framework that mirrors the 14-year, $10 .8 billion agreement signed with CBS and Turner Sports in April 2010.

2012

January: At the 2012 NCAA Convention in Indianapolis, Division II approves changes to recruiting-contact legislation and also to minimum requirements for conference membership.

May: The sixth National Championships Festival is conducted in Louisville.

September: Simon Fraser University of Burnaby, British Columbia, becomes the NCAA’s – and Division II’s – first international member school.

2013

November-December: The seventh National Championships Festival is conducted in Birmingham, Alabama.

2014

January: At the 2014 NCAA Convention in San Diego, Division II adopts a “Path to Graduation” legislative package that changes the division’s initial-eligibility and progress-toward-degree requirements for the first time in 31 years. The changes raise the initial-eligibility GPA requirement for student-athletes enrolling on or after August 1, 2018, to a minimum of 2.2 for qualifiers (up from the current 2.0) and establishes for the first time two sliding scales for full and partial qualifiers that allows lower standardized test scores to be offset by higher high school core course GPAs.

2015

January: Division II launches a brand enhancement initiative that features “Make It Yours” as the division’s tagline. The student-athlete-driven brand enhancement personalizes the balanced athletics and educational experiences that student-athletes have at Division II colleges and universities.

Division II Founding Members

Adelphi*
Akron
Alabama A&M
Alabama State
Albany State (Georgia)*
Alcorn
American International*
Amherst
Arkansas-Pine Bluff
Armstrong*
Assumption*
Augustana (South Dakota)*
Babson
Bakersfield
Baltimore
Baptist College
Bates
Bellarmine*
Belmont Abbey*
Benedict*
Bentley*
Bethune-Cookman
Biscayne
Bloomsburg*
Bowdoin
Bridgeport*
Bridgewater State
Bryant
Buffalo State
UC Davis
UC Irvine
UC Riverside
Cal Poly Pomona*
Cal Poly San Luis Obispo
Cal State Chico*
Cal State East Bay*
Cal State Fullerton
Cal State Northridge
California (Pennsylvania)*
Catholic
Central Connecticut State
Central Missouri*
Central State (Ohio)*
Central Washington*
Chapman
Chattanooga
Cheyney*
Clarion*
Clarkson
Colby
Colorado State-Pueblo*
Columbus State*
Delta State*
DeSales
East Stroudsburg*
Eastern Illinois
Edinboro*
Elizabeth City State*
Evansville
Fairleigh Dickinson-Florham
Fayetteville State*
Florida A&M
Florida Southern*
Florida Tech*
Fort Lewis*
Franciscan
Gannon*
George Mason
Georgia Regents Augusta*
Gettysburg
Grambling
Green Bay
Hamilton
Hampton
Hartford
Hartwick
Humboldt State*
Illinois-Chicago
Indiana (Pennsylvania)*
Indianapolis*
Jackson State
Jacksonville State
Johnson C. Smith*
Kentucky State*
Kentucky Wesleyan*
King’s (Pennsylvania)
Le Moyne*
Lincoln (Missouri)*
Livingstone*
LIU Post*
Louisiana-Lafayette
Louisiana-Monroe
Loyola Maryland
UMBC
Merchant Marine
Merrimack*
Michigan Tech*
Middlebury
Minnesota Duluth*
Minnesota State Mankato*
Minnesota State Moorhead*
Mississippi College
Mississippi Valley
Missouri-St. Louis*
Missouri S&T*
Missouri State
Morgan State
Morningside
Morris Brown
Mount Saint Mary’s
Nebraska Omaha
New England College
New Haven*
New Orleans
Nicholls State
Norfolk State
North Alabama*
North Carolina Central
North Carolina-Wilmington
North Dakota
North Dakota State
University of Northern Iowa
Northern Michigan*
Northwest Missouri State*
Norwich
Oakland
Old Dominion
Prairie View A&M
Puget Sound
Quinnipiac
Regis (Colorado)*
Roanoke
Rollins*
Sacramento State
Sacred Heart
Saint Anselm*
Saint Augustine’s*
St. Cloud State*
Saint Joseph’s (Indiana)*
St. Michael’s*
St. Norbert
St. Paul’s
St. Thomas (Minnesota)
San Diego
San Francisco State*
University of the Sciences*
Scranton
Seattle Pacific*
Shaw*
Shippensburg*
Siena
Slippery Rock*
South Dakota
South Dakota State
Southeast Missouri State
Southern University
Southern Connecticut State*
Southern Illinois Edwardsville
Southern Oregon
Southern Tech Institute
Springfield
Stonehill*
Stony Brook
UT Martin
Tennessee State
Texas Southern
Towson
Trinity (Connecticut)
Trinity (Texas)
Troy
Truman*
Tufts
Tuskegee*
Union (New York)
Union (Tennessee)
Valdosta State*
Valparaiso
Virginia Union*
Wagner
Wesleyan (Connecticut)
West Georgia*
Western Carolina
Western Illinois
Western State*
Wilberforce
Williams
Winston-Salem State*
Wisconsin-Superior
Wisconsin-Whitewater
WPI
Wright State
Youngstown State
*Current Division II member